Coyote jumps boy in second Hamilton-area incident in just over a week

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Posted with permission from the Hamilton Spectator
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Coyote experts say there is no reason to suspect the animals are in greater numbers or more aggressive this year in the Hamilton area, even after a couple of local incidents.
October 30th, 2018 The Hamilton Spectator



Theron Wood's golden doodle, Holly was attacked and killed by coyotes last Tuesday. - Cathie Coward/ Hamilton Spectator


A coyote spotted near Pier 8 and the outdoor skating rink along Hamilton's waterfront in January 2017. - Barry Gray, Hamilton Spectator file photo
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Coyote experts say there is no reason to suspect the animals are in greater numbers or more aggressive this year in the Hamilton area, even after a couple of local incidents.
On Oct. 16, a goldendoodle dog was attacked and killed off the Bruce Trail, on the escarpment near Scenic Falls. The 10-year-old dog named Holly had gotten off her leash before getting into a confrontation with at least two coyotes.
And then on Oct. 25, a 10-year-old boy was jumped from behind by a coyote on the Waterfront trail of the Beach Strip. The boy's mother, Tammy Aquin, says the dog didn't bite him, but stood on his chest for a few moments and showed its teeth, before the boy punched the dog and it ran off.
The boy, Ethan, did not require medical attention, she said.
The Ministry of Natural Resources says coyote numbers do not appear to have substantially increased in recent years. Based on reports from deer hunters, a spokesperson said, numbers peaked "in 2009 or 2010 and since then numbers seem to have been relatively stable or declining slightly across most of southern Ontario."

A spokesperson from Coyote Watch, a volunteer group that monitors sightings, said this year has been a typical one for coyotes.

https://www.thespec.com/news-story/...d-hamilton-area-incident-in-just-over-a-week/
 

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Coyote makes off with Joey the Chihuahua on Hamilton beach strip
November 13, 2018 The Hamilton Spectator



Hamilton Police say a woman reported that her dog was snatched away by a coyote early Tuesday on the beach strip. - Coyote Watch Canada
Hamilton police say a woman is distraught after a coyote snatched away her small dog early Tuesday at the beach strip.
Police said the woman and her dog, Joey, a small white coloured Chihuahua, were walking along the Waterfront Trail of the beach strip sometime after 1:30 a.m. when they stopped near a bench.
According to the woman, the coyote appeared and grabbed the dog and dragged it away.





Police said Victim Services was called to help the shaken woman. Animal Services has since been unable to find the dog or the coyote. Police do not believe the dog was on a leash at the time it was dragged away.
The attack comes less than a month after a Goldendoodle named Holly was attacked and killed by a pack of coyotes on the Bruce Trail.
And then on Oct. 25, a 10-year-old boy was jumped from behind by a coyote on the Waterfront trail of the Beach Strip. The boy's mother said the dog didn't bite him, but stood on his chest for a few moments and showed its teeth, before the boy punched the dog and it ran off.
Despite the recent activity, Coyote experts say there is no reason to suspect the animals are in greater numbers or more aggressive this year in the Hamilton area.
The Ministry of Natural Resources says coyote numbers do not appear to have substantially increased in recent years. Based on reports from deer hunters, a spokesperson said, numbers peaked "in 2009 or 2010 and since then numbers seem to have been relatively stable or declining slightly across most of southern Ontario."
A spokesperson from Coyote Watch, a volunteer group that monitors sightings, said this year has been a typical one for coyotes.
 

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City offers coyote safety tips for pets
Residents shouldn’t let their pets off leash while on a walk
November 17th, 2018 The Hamilton Spectator



Coyote experts say there is no reason to suspect the animals are in greater numbers or more aggressive this year in Hamilton. - Barry Gray , Hamilton Spectator file photo
The City of Hamilton is offering tips on how to keep pets safe from coyotes this winter after a couple of recent attacks.
"We ask residents to take some reasonable precautions when out walking their dog," Ken Leendertse, director of licensing and bylaw services, said in a release.
He said owners should avoid letting their pets off a leash while on a walk, keep pets near them and avoid walking dogs during "heightened coyote activity times" — dawn and dusk.
On Tuesday, a coyote ran off with Joey — a white, fluffy, chihuahua-pomeranian cross — while his owner was walking him on the beach strip around dawn.
The attack came weeks after Holly, a goldendoodle, was ambushed and killed by a pack of coyotes on the Bruce Trail.

And then, on Oct. 25, a 10-year-old boy was jumped from behind by a coyote on the Waterfront Trail of the beach strip.
The boy's mother said the coyote didn't bite him, but stood on his chest for a few moments and showed its teeth, before the boy punched the animal and it ran off.
Despite recent activity, coyote experts say there is no reason to suspect the animals are in greater numbers or more aggressive this year in Hamilton.
This year's coyote sightings are on par with 2017 — with 317 sighted in 2018 compared to 479 spotted last year, the city said.
The lack of leaves on trees in the winter can lend itself to more coyote sightings, but they are present all year, the city said.

The city recommends:

• Stretching out your arms and legs to make yourself appear larger and making loud noises if approached by a coyote;

• Carrying a flashlight and flashing it in the eyes of the coyote or carrying an umbrella and opening and closing it to deter a coyote;

• Carrying a whistle and blowing it loudly and continuously;

• Staying calm and never running;

• Carrying a cellphone;

• Not leaving small children, cats or other pets unattended in yards where there is known coyote activity.

https://www.thespec.com/news-story/9037475-city-offers-coyote-safety-tips-for-pets/
 

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From 2017

See a coyote? Keep your distance: Burlington Animal Control
Department offers tips on how to reduce conflicts between coyotes and humans, pets
Jan 17, 2017 by John Bkila Burlington Post



A lone coyote spotted roaming the green space along the north side of Mainway opposite Sutton Drive, seemingly unfazed by traffic, earlier this month. - Graham Paine/Metroland
The City of Burlington’s Animal Control department is reminding local residents to not be concerned if they see any coyotes this time of year.
“You will see them because they are out feeding and things like that. And you don’t have the foliage on the trees, so you’ll see them out a little bit more,” said Dave Lake, supervisor for Animal Control.
So far, there have been 20 sightings this year — in 2016, there were 355 in total.
But Lake said residents shouldn’t misinterpret this year’s statistic so far as one coyote can be the result of many reports.
When we get one call on them, a number of people tend to see the same one. So, we get multiple calls because people aren’t used to seeing them,” explained Lake, noting Animal Control has been getting a few sightings a week.
Lately, the locations coyotes have been spotted have been spread out, according to Lake.
“We’ve had some at Guelph Line/Lakeshore Road area, Aldershot and up by the police station near the hydro fields — that’s where they tend to be more,” he said.
Lake explains the wild animals are not really interested in people. They’re curious, so when people have been approached, it’s been when they’ve been walking their dogs.
“Coyotes are territorial and they’re looking at that dog as a food source. But if you clap, yell at it… they should run away. We’ve also recommended air horns. Something different because they’re used to car horns now,” he said.
“They become very adaptable, but if you make them feel unwelcome, they will move on.”
Removing coyote attractants, such as food, is one of the most significant ways to reduce human/coyote interactions, according Animal Control.

Birdseed and ripe or rotted fruit that has fallen on the ground in a yard can attract smaller animals, which in turn, attract coyotes.

Garbage, compost and pet food should be stored in a place where wild animals cannot get.





Residents should never approach a coyote, its den or pups and should teach their children to respect and admire wildlife safely from far away.

Keeping pets leashed, especially during the April-June denning season and September-October, when coyote pups leave the den, can help reduce conflicts between the wild animal and pets.

Cleaning up after your pet dog while out for a walk can help too, as coyotes are attracted to canine feces.

Neutering your pets will ensure coyotes are not attracted to and won’t try to mate with your domesticated dog.

“People have to keep an eye on their small dogs and their pets on a leash,” said Lake. “It’s not only a bylaw but for their safety. When dogs have been approached, it’s been around wooded areas, so just keep your pets safe on a leash.”

Animal Control also advises residents make their properties unwelcoming to coyotes by using flashing lights, motion sensors and noisemakers.

Putting up a two-metre high fence that extends at least 20 centimetres underground can help, as can ensuring the spaces around and under decks and sheds are closed off.

Coyote sightings are commonplace, according to the city, and if one is seen, it will most likely avoid humans if they keep their distance.

There several tips on what to do if anyone encounters an aggressive coyote, including:

• stopping, picking up small children and pets, shouting “go away” and waving your arms high in the air;

• using hazing techniques, such as popping open an umbrella, tossing an object near the coyote or shaking your keys;

• backing away slowly while remaining calm — never run or turn your back;

• reporting a sighting to the city by phone, if the coyote is aggressive, sick or injured — online for all other sightings;

• calling 911 and alerting Halton Regional Police Service if the animal poses an immediate threat or danger to public safety.

If anyone sees a coyote, potential problem related to garbage or the intentional or accidental feeding of a coyote, the city asks them to report their sighting online at https://goo.gl/U1dcbR or call 905-335-3030.

For more resources, visit www.burlington.ca/en/services-for-you/Coyotes.asp.

https://www.thespec.com/news-story/...keep-your-distance-burlington-animal-control/
 
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