Hotels on the Beach

scotto

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The Beach Strip
#1
From the book, "The Sand Strip" by Dorothy Turcotte.


As the years went by, a number of hotels sprang up along the Beach. The best known, and still the oldest operating tavern in Ontario is Dynes, established in 1846. City folks gladly braved the deplorable dirt road or the choppy ride across the Bay in order to enjoy one of John Dynes' famous fish or duck dinners.
Dynes Hotel was destroyed by fire in 1882, but was quickly rebuilt. Its grounds were the site of many large picnics and sports events. For example, when the plumbers and gasfitters held their picnic at Dynes, about 600 people attended to enjoy baseball, swimming races off the floating wharf, a fishing match, and dancing to Makins' string band. For many years, Dynes was headquarters for the Annual Beach Fete which featured swimming and boating races, sports, and even in later years, aviation stunts over the lake. When Dynes discontinued the Fete, it was carried on by another group of people under the name of Beach Day.
Other hotels along the Beach were Wells' Tavern, the Lakeside, the Sportsman's Arms, Corey House owned by Jake and Lou Corey, Perry's Hotel and Martin's Pleasure Gardens. The best of these hotels had wharfs on the bayside of the beach strip. Steamers from Hamilton brought boatloads of fun-seekers to these wharfs and, the proprietors hoped, into the hotels. Ontario and Mazeppa were two of the popular ships on this run.
On one occasion, the steamer Ontario had trouble docking at Martin's in rough weather. Some of the passengers were impatient and began to jump from the ship onto the wharf. Rotten planks on the dock gave away, plunging some of the people into the bay. Three children were drowned. At the investigation which followed, emotions ran high with the proprietor being accused of neglect and even murder. In the end, however, no charges were laid.
On December 20th, 1874, George Thompson wrote that "The Old Tavern burned." The embers glowed until the 30th. About a month later, three men from Hamilton came to look at the site, and within four days work had begun on a new tavern. "The Old Tavern" was Baldry's. From its ashes, like the phoenix, rose a new hotel, the Ocean House.
When the Ocean House opened for business in May of 1875, Captain Campbell, who replaced George Thompson as lighthouse keeper, reported that more than 430 vehicles crossed the Canal by ferry to visit the new establishment.
The following year, the Birley brothers added an annex to the Ocean House. It contained a bowling alley, billiard room, a bar, and a ballroom.
The new hotel brought so many excursionists to the Beach that a writer in The Times on August 21st, 1879 complains that "the sidewalks from the Canal to the Ocean House are blocked by a lot of hucksters, targets for shooting and other obstructions . . . the hucksters come not only from Hamilton and vicinity, but from Toronto, Caledonia and other places. . . If the annoyance is allowed to go on it will seriously affect the popularity of the Beach."
In the spring of 1895, however, steps were taken to tidy up the Canal Reserve. A photographer's gallery, an ice cream stand, an ice house and a candy shop were ordered removed. Seats were placed under the trees, and orders were given that swimming in the Canal and camping were forbidden.
The Ocean House was a popular resort until Wednesday, July 17th, 1895. On that day, the hotel was unusually busy as the Royal Hamilton Yacht Club and the Victoria Yacht Club were having" a joint regatta.
According to the Hamilton Herald report, when one of the Ocean House bartenders opened the cellar door, smoke and flames poured out. Within minutes, the whole annex was ablaze, and soon after the entire hotel went with it. Hamiltonians could see the flames across the Bay. Many watched from the tower of the City Hall and other vantage points in the city. Those who owned boats went out onto the Bay to watch the conflagration. The resort was never rebuilt.
Other hotels on the Beach lasted longer, but some suffered the same fate.
In 1860, Mrs. Fish's tavern was struck by lightning and burned to the ground.
The Perry House burned in April, 1918, victim of a spark from a passing train. Flames this time burned the Cataract Power Company's high tension wires so that for a time the radial cars were unable to run. Fortunately, within a few months, John Perry was operating the Lakeside Hotel on the same site. The new hotel building cost $120,000, and re¬mained until the new Canal bridge was built in the 1950's.
 

David O'Reilly

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#2
Scott, "The Ocean House was a popular resort until Wednesday, July 17th, 1895. On that day, the hotel was unusually busy as the Royal Hamilton Yacht Club and the Victoria Yacht Club were having" a joint regatta.
According to the Hamilton Herald report, when one of the Ocean House bartenders opened the cellar door, smoke and flames poured out. Within minutes, the whole annex was ablaze, and soon after the entire hotel went with it."

The Ocean House, just south of the Burlington Canal was burned down on the 17 July along with the Grand Trunk platform and telegraph office. The Burlington Fire Dept. managed to save another hotel to the south of the Ocean House.
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1895

do you know the name of the hotel that was saved? If not, the news paper articles that reported this story probably gave the name.
 

David O'Reilly

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#3
Scott, "Other hotels along the Beach were Wells' Tavern, the Lakeside, the Sportsman's Arms, Corey House owned by Jake and Lou Corey, Perry's Hotel and Martin's Pleasure Gardens. The best of these hotels had wharfs on the bayside of the beach strip. Steamers from Hamilton brought boatloads of fun-seekers to these wharfs and, the proprietors hoped, into the hotels. Ontario and Mazeppa were two of the popular ships on this run."

1860 - "An advertisement placed in the Hamilton Spectator on the 7 May, notified the citizens that the small steamer VALLEY CITY, Capt. Wilkinson, would operate daily, except Sunday, from MacKay's Wharf to Oaklands and the Beach. By June, she was running a Sunday trip to Wellington Square."
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1860

1863 - "The steamer HERO commenced service from the Great Western Ry. wharf to the Beach.
on the 14 July."
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1863



1868 - A notice on the 23 June reminded the public that the steamer ARGYLE was running two trips per day to Oaklands and the Beach. She started from the Victoria Wharf and called at Bastien's Wharf.
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1868

1874 - Three steamers were in service on the Bay for the summer. The DENNIS BOWEN,Martin Stally, captain, was running to the Beach with calls at Rook Bay, Martin's Wharf and Dyne's Wharf twice a day. She sailed from the wharf
"formerly occupied by the ARGYLE".
The steamer TRANSIT,Capt. G. Beatty, also stopped. at Rock Bay and Dyne's and the ARGYLE,Capt. F. Reynolds, was leaving the foot of Bay Street for The Gardens at the Beach.
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1874

1878 - The Hamilton Spectator announced the entry of yet another steamer into the Burlington Bay resort trade on the 19 April. The item read:
"We are pleased to state that a new steamer will make her appearance on the waters of Burlington Bay and Lake Ontario at the opening of navigation. She is called the PRINCE ARTHUR, owned by R. G. Lunt of Toronto and capable of carrying 1,000 persons. She is magnificently furnished and is commanded by one of the most experienced Lake captains, formerly of the Royal Mail Line. This steamer will run in connection with the street railway from MacKay's Wharf to the Beach during the day and it is the intention, we believe, to make regular evening excursions on the Bay and the Lake when the weather is favourable.
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1878
 

David O'Reilly

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#5
I wish I had found this earlier. I include it just to show how the cost of things has changed.
1870 - Among the attractions provided for the citizens on the Queen's Brithday were excursions to Oaklands and the Beach on the steamer ARGYIE, round trip 25 cents,
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1870

and just to add some information about other structures that were built on the beach.
1869 - A meeting was held in the Royal Hotel on the 12 November, for the purpose of taking into consideration the proposal to build a summer hotel on Burlington Beach. http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1869
Does anyone know what hotel this was?

1891 - The Royal Hamilton Yacht Club was planning to build a large club house on the southside of the Burlington Canal, a little to the west of the Light Station
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1891
1892 - The Royal Hamilton Yacht Club held the official opening of their new club house
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1892
 

David O'Reilly

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#6
Scott,
"The Perry House burned in April, 1918, victim of a spark from a passing train. Flames this time burned the Cataract Power Company's high tension wires so that for a time the radial cars were unable to run. Fortunately, within a few months, John Perry was operating the Lakeside Hotel on the same site."

Scott, would the flames really have been as high as the Cataract power wires on the towers? I wonder if it wasn't the radial trolley wire that was burned.
 

David O'Reilly

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#7
Scott,
"On one occasion, the steamer Ontario had trouble docking at Martin's in rough weather. Some of the passengers were impatient and began to jump from the ship onto the wharf. Rotten planks on the dock gave away, plunging some of the people into the bay. children were drowned. At the investigation which followed, emotions ran high with the proprietor being accused of neglect and even murder. In the end, however, no charges were laid."

This page doesn't give any more information than what you have presented, but it indicates that Martin's Pleasure Gardens was running in 1872. This will maybe help in tracking down the opening date if you are interested in creating a 'hotel time line'.

1872 - An accident which filled the papers for some time occurred on the 1 Julhy at the Beach. Late in the afternoon, the flimsy jerry-built structure known as Martin's Wharf collapsed under the weight of the holiday crowd and several small children were drowned. The inquest, with Capt. Thomas Harbottle as foreman of the coroner's jury, dragged on for some time and brought to light the fact that F. G. Beckett & Co. had no exclusive rights to the wharf. Mrs. Martin, the owner, stated she had signed no lease with the Becketts, or anyone else.
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1872#p12.72.19
 

David O'Reilly

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Dec 15, 2012
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#8
Scott,

". The best known, and still the oldest operating tavern in Ontario is Dynes, established in 1846. City folks gladly braved the deplorable dirt road or the choppy ride
across the Bay in order to enjoy one of John Dynes' famous fish or duck dinners.
Dynes Hotel was destroyed by fire in 1882, but was quickly rebuilt. Its grounds were the site of many large picnics and sports events."

1899 - the death of John Dynes, proprietor of the famous hotel on the Beach, was noted in the press. He was born in 1816 in Dundas and had located on the Beach in 1834. His hotel was long a favourite of fishermen and duck-hunters and was noted for the excellence of its fish and game dinners.
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1899#p16.99.40
 

Drogo

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Feb 8, 2005
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#9
Composite 1833-1845-today canal picture

I've put together a composite picture. I started with a satellite today. Then took the 1845 drawing of the canal widening. That picture had buildings on it in an area designated "village". I was wondering where Nehemiah Corey's Hotel was so I made the 1845 into a transparency and put it over the satellite and added the names from the 1833 hand drawing of the canal residents. Building sizes were appropriate for what the buildings should have been. Just having fun and the 1833 and 1845 are on the site. Scott uploaded them before.
 

scotto

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The Beach Strip
#10
The section of the pier on the Burlington side where you added the ferry, notice you can still see the old road that was discontinued many, many years ago. There is still a guard rail there at the end of the road.
 

Drogo

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Feb 8, 2005
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#11
Are you saying that there is still a guard rail today??? On the Burlington side?? Must go for a walk if that's correct.
 

scotto

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The Beach Strip
#12
Are you saying that there is still a guard rail today??? On the Burlington side?? Must go for a walk if that's correct.
I believe so, it is buried under the brush, but still there last time I looked.

Maybe this thread should be moved to the Beach Hotels thread?
 

scotto

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The Beach Strip
#14
From the Beach history project done by the pupils of grades nine and ten of the Beach Bungalow School back in 1943.


No story of the Beach would be complete without a few facts and comments concerning the various hotels and taverns which flourished here. Generally speaking, one may say that these old hostelries were more famous for their downright hospitality than they were notorious for drunkenness and rowdiness. And having said that, we can proceed to consider the most interesting and popular of these establishments.
The King’s Head Inn
This oldest of all inns in the Hamilton district was a large two-storey building with two wings, and. it was built on the order of Governor Simcoe in 1794, The site, near the present location of the Black Bridge, was chosen for strategic reasons; the apparent reason was, as we have already stated in this history, to afford accommodation for travellers. But the principal purpose was of quite a different nature; infact, it was to be a depot for stores and provisions as well as a rendezvous for the militia and, such other troops as might be needed, to defend the line of communication between York and Detroit and Niagara. Preparations were being made to protect Upper Canada, for war between Great Britain and the United States was considered inevitable at that time. But as far as can be learned, the King's Head Inn did not figure very prominently as a military outpost. It did, however, function as an inn, and it is reasonable to believe that Governor and Mrs. Simcoe were guests there several times. Lady Simcoe's sketch of the building shows clearly the door sign that was suspended above the main entrance; that self same sign is now in the possession of the Beach Bungalow school.
The King’s Head Inn, or one operated on the same location, was operated by the Fitch brothers in later years. It was known as the Fitch Hotel, and was a familiar landmark in the district.
Dynes Hotel
This hotel was built by John Dynes, the son of a United Empire Loyalist who was among the first settlers on the Beach. Under John's management, and later under his son Harry, this establishment earned a reputation for duck and fish dinners and for generous hospitality. The original building was destroyed, and the present structure represents the second building greatly enlarged and improved. On the park adjacent to the hotel, many interesting sports days have been sponsored by the management.
The Ocean House
Near the canal was located this famous hostelry. It represented in its day the last word in hotel construction as a seaside luxury residence, Its guests included people of consequence and influence, and it was the scene of many brilliant parties. Being of frame structure, the Ocean House fell very readily a prey to flames in 1898.
The Lakeside was another well-known hotel which ranked with those already described. And there were the Sportsman’s Arms, run by Fred Corey, and the Arlington House, Fould's Hotel, Niblock's Tavern and Martin's Pleasure Gardens. The latter were located on the bayshore at Station 8. To reach these pleasure gardens, one had to cross over a swampy area by means of a rustic bridge. To facilitate the coming of visitors to his rendezvous, George Martin built a wharf to which there was a regular ferry service from Hamilton. To-day the Beach has two licensed hotels, The new Dynes and the Lakeside in the canal zone.
 

David O'Reilly

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#16
Scott,
"As the years went by, a number of hotels sprang up along the Beach. The best known, and still the oldest operating tavern in Ontario is Dynes, established in 1846. City folks gladly braved the deplorable dirt road or the choppy ride
across the Bay in order to enjoy one of John Dynes' famous fish or duck dinners.
Dynes Hotel was destroyed by fire in 1882, but was quickly rebuilt. Its grounds were the site of many large picnics and sports events. For example, when the plumbers and gasfitters held their picnic at Dynes, about 600 people attended to enjoy baseball, swimming races off the floating wharf, a fishing match, and dancing to Makins' string band. For many years, Dynes was headquarters for the Annual Beach Fete which featured swimming and boating races, sports, and even in later years, aviation stunts over the lake."

1894 - "The regatta of the Canadian Association of Amateur Oarsmen was scheduled for Friday and Saturday, 3 & 4 August and the Hamilton Steamboat Co. promised a sailing every twenty minutes from the James St. Slip to the Beach, using the MACASSA,MODJESKA,MAZEPPA and the CITY OF WINDSOR."
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1894

I wonder if the regatta was held at Dynes. But even if it wasn't, 'a sailing every twenty minetts' indicates how popular the beach was for sports events.
 
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David O'Reilly

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#17
Scott
“From the book, "The Sand Strip" by Dorothy Turcotte.


As the years went by, a number of hotels sprang up along the Beach. The best known, and still the oldest operating tavern in Ontario is Dynes, established in 1846. City folks gladly braved the deplorable dirt road or the choppy ride across the Bay in order to enjoy one of John Dynes' famous fish or duck dinners.” … “Other hotels along the Beach were Wells' Tavern, the Lakeside, the Sportsman's Arms, Corey House owned by Jake and Lou Corey, Perry's Hotel and Martin's Pleasure Gardens. The best of these hotels had wharfs on the bayside of the beach strip. Steamers from Hamilton brought boatloads of fun-seekers to these wharfs and, the proprietors hoped, into the hotels. Ontario and Mazeppa were two of the popular ships on this run.”

Scott, do you know if some type of a permit had to be obtained in order to build a wharff or pier from the beach in to the bay? or even in to the lake? If the answer is ‘yes’, it would be interesting to know what level of government was involved. And then see if there are any records that show just how menny piers were built over the years, and just how large they were

And It seems that it wasn’t just the beach hotels that built piers.

1893 - “The Hamilton Steamboat Co. was calling for tenders for the construction of a wharf at Burlington Beach on the 30 January. It was to be situated on the Armstrong property, near Church Crossing and was to be 600 feet long. It was primarily for the use of the steamer MAZEPPA.”

“Fears were expressed by the residents at the Beach that the proposed wharf would interfere with small boats and members of the Parks Committee approached T. B. Griffith of the Hamilton Steamboat Co. in this respect. It was agreed that one section of the wharf would have an additional 2 1/2 feet clearance, to permit row boats, etc. to pass beneath it.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1893

So I wonder what the ‘Parks Committee’ was.
 

David O'Reilly

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#18
‘I have copied information on the ferries that ran to the beach from the Hamilton Harbour 1826/1900’ page. Hopefully I haven’t missed anything.



1866 - “The Hamilton Times, on 8 May, carried this article regarding the steamer ARGYLE:
"This favourite steamer, the property of Messrs. Cameron & Innes, enters upon the business of this season with increased facilities for the comfort and safety of passengers. Her machinery has been thoroughly over-hauled and a splendid new boiler of much larger capacity has been put in. This will not fail to give increased confidence to the large numbers who have been in the habit of making regular trips to the Beach or Oaklands during the summer months."
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1866

1867 - “During August, the ARGYLE was running to Oaklands and the Beach, but the PRINCESS OF WALES had taken leave of the harbour and was reported to be operating between Toronto and the Island.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1867

1868 – “A notice on the 23 June reminded the public that the steamer ARGYLE was running two trips per day to Oaklands and the Beach. She started from the Victoria Wharf and called at Bastien's Wharf.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1868

1870 – “Among the attractions provided for the citizens on the Queen's Brithday were excursions to Oaklands and the Beach on the steamer ARGYIE, round trip 25 cents,”

“Mr. Beckett's new propeller was rapidly nearing completion and was expected to make a trial run on the 3 June. She was intended for the accommodation of pleasure parties and would make trips to Oaklands and the Beach during two or three days of each week. The remainder of the time, she was to be used for business purposes.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1870

1872 – “F. G. Beckett & Co. stated in the Hamilton Spectator on the 7 June, that they had leased Martin's Wharf on the Beach and that their steamer ONTARIO would be the only vessel going to that point. This was later proved to be a bluff to keep the ARGYLE, or any other vessel, away.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1872

1874 – “Three steamers were in service on the Bay for the summer. The DENNIS BOWEN,Martin Stally, captain, was running to the Beach with calls at Rook Bay, Martin's Wharf and Dyne's Wharf twice a day. She sailed from the wharf "formerly occupied by the ARGYLE".
The steamer TRANSIT,Capt. G. Beatty, also stopped. at Rock Bay and Dyne's and the ARGYLE,Capt. F. Reynolds, was leaving the foot of Bay Street for The Gardens at the Beach.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1874

1875 – “"On the 25 May, the Hamilton Spectator printed. an article under the title of

A Trip to the Beach"
and it read as follows:
"On Saturday last, a party of ladies and gentlemen took passage on the steamer FLORENCE at the invitation of the owners, Messrs. S. & H. Jenking of Windsor,…” for a trip to the Beach. This vessel has lately appeared in our waters to run regularly to the Beach.”

“In an advertisement placed in the Spectator on the 26 May, the FLORENCE was to make three round trips per day sailing from Malcolmson's Wharf, foot of Simcoe Street. This was the old Beckett Wharf. She took her passengers directly to the piers at the Canal.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1875

1876 – “On the 26 May, advertisements appeared for the steamers FLORENCE and TRANSIT running to the Beach. The latter called at the Brant House, on her way.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1876

1878 – “The Hamilton Spectator announced the entry of yet another steamer into the Burlington Bay resort trade on the 19 April. The item read:
"We are pleased to state that a new steamer will make her appearance on the waters of Burlington Bay and Lake Ontario at the opening of navigation. She is called the PRINCE ARTHUR, owned by R. G. Lunt of Toronto and capable of carrying 1,000 persons. She is magnificently furnished and is commanded by one of the most experienced Lake captains, formerly of the Royal Mail Line. This steamer will run in connection with the street railway from MacKay's Wharf to the Beach during the day and it is the intention, we believe, to make regular evening excursions on the Bay and the Lake when the weather is favourable. Messrs. Wylie & Bowman are the agents in Hamilton and they will have season tickets for sale."

“The steamer PRINCE ARTHUR made trips to the Beach on Wednesdays, going on to Grimsby in the afternoon. On Thursdays and Saturdays she ran to the Beach and, on Fridays she went to Grimsby,Niagara and Queenston.”

“The JULIETTE was sharing the Simcoe Street Wharf and was making three round trips per day to Oaklands and the Beach.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1878

1880 - Favoured by fine weather, the Victoria Day holiday brought much business to the Brant House and the Ocean House, as well as to Oaklands. The ECLIPSE and the DENNIS BOWEN handled the traffic to Oaklands and the SOUTHERN BELLE brought some 800 passengers over from Toronto in the morning. She then made a round trip to Toronto with a good crowd of Hamiltonians and returned to Toronto in the evening. Another small steamer, the GENEVA, purchased by Dr. Springer in Kingston, had left that port on the 20 May and got to Hamilton in time for the holiday. She carried about 1,500 passengers to the Beach during the day.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1880

1881 – “The Hamilton Regatta, staged on the 20 July, drew crowds from Toronto, who came on the SOUTHERN BELLE and on something advertised as the "LADY RUPERT",”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1881

1882 – “On the 24 June the steamer GENEVA brought a large excursion party from Dundas to the Beach.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1882

1883 – “The Hamilton Spectator, on the 28 November, carried the story of the loss of the steamer ECLIPSE, formerly Leopold Bauer'sJULIETTE, which ran briefly on the Bay. It read as follows:
"Lovers of boating and excursions of this city will have no difficulty in remembering the little steamer JULIETTE, which, about five years ago, ran on the Bay in connection with Mr. Bauer's house at Oaklands, also calling at Rock Bay and the Beach. The JULIETTE was built by Mr. Cooper of Mayville, N.Y. and her owners thought she was going to be a staunch and fast little steamer. However, they were disappointed, for almost the first time she carried a crowd, she partially upset and it was only by her falling against the wharf, that a calamity was averted. This set the people against her and the Customs Officers inspected her, giving her a permit to carry only 100 passengers. By the next season, however, she was fixed up considerably by being widened and her name was changed to ECLIPSE. The order limiting her capacity was canceled and she did a fair business that season.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1883

1885 – “notice was given that the "powerful new side-wheel steamer CANADIAN,Capt. Angus G. Stanton, would make hourly trips from the James St. Wharf to the Beach. She could carry 500 passengers and would run during the season in connection with the Street Railway.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1885

1887 - “T. B. Griffith, president of the newly organized Hamilton Steamboat Company, with invited guests, made a trip around the harbour on the steamer MAZEPPA,Capt. Stanton, on the 20 May.”… “She was registered at Hamilton on the 4 July 1887 and was to commence trips to the Beach on the 21 May, sailing from the James St. Slip.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1887

1891 – “a party of ladies and gentlemen, totaling 23 in all, proceeded down the ‘Desjardins’ canal ‘from Dundas’ for an excursion to Burlington Beach in the steam launch ALFIE.”

“The Lake Yacht Racing Association held a very successful regatta on the 13 August and were blessed with beautiful sailing weather. The MAZEPPA and the MODJESKA were kept busy carrying capacity loads to the Canal and the Grand Trunk Ry. ran special trains from the City to their platform at the Ocean House.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1890

1893 – “The Hamilton Steamboat Co. was calling for tenders for the construction of a wharf at Burlington Beach on the 30 January. It was to be situated on the Armstrong property, near Church Crossing and was to be 600 feet long. It was primarily for the use of the steamer MAZEPPA.”

“A company was formed in Dundas to purchase a steamer for service from that Town to Burlington Beach and Rock Bay and Jas.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1893
 

David O'Reilly

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#19
1894 – “On the 1 August, the Hamilton Steamboat Co. announced, that they expected. to have the steamer CITY OF WINDSOR in Hamilton to assist with the crowds wishing to attend the regatta on the 4 August.”
“The regatta of the Canadian Association of Amateur Oarsmen was scheduled for Friday and Saturday, 3 & 4 August and the Hamilton Steamboat Co. promised a sailing every twenty minutes from the James St. Slip to the Beach, using the MACASSA,MODJESKA,MAZEPPA and the CITY OF WINDSOR.”
“In November, the Hamilton Steamboat Co.qpany's pier at Elsinore on Burlington Beach, was being repaired and strengthened.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1894

1898 – “The Hamilton Steamboat Co. announced on the 20 June, that the steamer MAZEPPA would start her seasonal trips the following weekend calling at Burlington, Elsinore and Brown's Wharf in East Flamborough. The MACASSA and MODJESKA were already stopping at the Canal four times each way. The fare on the MAZEPPA was 15 cents return and included the street car fare, both ways.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1898

1899 – “By the latter part of June, the steamer MAZEPPA was making ten round trips daily to the Beach. The fare was 20 cents return and this included transportation on the Hamilton Street Ry.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1899
 

David O'Reilly

Registered User
Dec 15, 2012
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#20
Scott, do you have any information about a hotel on the beach owned by a ‘Jack McNeil’? this article on the 1890 wreck on the beach of The schooner W. J. SUFFELL, says “As soon as Capt. Corson saw his crew safe, he made his way to Jack McNeil's Hotel to thaw out and tell his story.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1890

it’s interesting that the word ‘hotel’ is written with a capital ‘H’. this could be read as the hotel itself was called ‘Jack McNeil's Hotel’.
 
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