Niagara Falls Ice

Crawfish

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Dec 1, 2004
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Longueuil, Quebec
#3
Some impressive shots here. Never saw this when I was a kid. Glad to see that the old barge is hanging tough. Every time we went to the falls it was necessary to check to see if it was still there and here it is well over half a century later.
 

scotto

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Feb 16, 2004
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The Beach Strip
#4
Some impressive shots here. Never saw this when I was a kid. Glad to see that the old barge is hanging tough. Every time we went to the falls it was necessary to check to see if it was still there and here it is well over half a century later.
The barge has been there for as long as I recall, so I looked it up, it was actually 1918 that it broke loose from a tug. The whole story here;

http://www.niagarafrontier.com/scow.html
 

Sharla1

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Oct 15, 2009
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#5
I wonder how long it will be before it eventually goes down the falls. Due to this proven fact that the falls recedes 12 feet a year.

I would have liked to have seen the falls area when it was still a glacier here. I bet that would have been quite a sight.
 
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scotto

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#6
I wonder how long it will be before it eventually goes down the falls. Due to this proven fact that the falls recedes 12 feet a year.

I would have liked to have seen the falls area when it was still a glacier here. I bet that would have been quite a sight.
You must mean 12 inches, I have read that it use to be three feet but engineering and less water have slowed down the damage.

The verdant green colour of the water flowing over the Niagara Falls is a byproduct of the estimated 60 tonnes/minute of dissolved salts and "rock flour" (very finely ground rock) generated by the erosive force of the Niagara River itself. The current rate of erosion is approximately 1 foot (0.30 m) per year down from a historical average of 3 feet (0.91 m) per year. It is estimated that 50,000 years from now, even at this reduced rate of erosion, the remaining 20 miles (32 km) to Lake Erie will have been undermined and the falls will cease to exist.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Woodward_(Niagara_Falls)#Over_The_Falls
 

Sharla1

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Oct 15, 2009
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#10
Glad to see that the old barge is hanging tough. Every time we went to the falls it was necessary to check to see if it was still there and here it is well over half a century later.
I wonder how long it will take before it goes over the falls from the falls receding?
 

scotto

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#11

Sharla1

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#12
No we won't see that in our lifetime. But I'm sure one day it will happen. I could just imagine how much news that would make at the time.

I'm surprised it never dislodged over the years.
 

scotto

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#13
Some impressive shots here. Never saw this when I was a kid. Glad to see that the old barge is hanging tough. Every time we went to the falls it was necessary to check to see if it was still there and here it is well over half a century later.
Member Crawfish brought up the old barge back in 2014 that has been sitting just shy of the Falls since 1918, just found this story of another vessel that ended up not far same barge.
Niagara Falls Public Library: Second ship sat stranded in river for more than a decade
May 09, 2018 by Cathy Roy Special to The Niagara Falls Review

I am sure that most of us are familiar with the story of the Old Scow that has been stranded on the shoals of the Niagara River for many years. We have probably heard about the daring rescue of the two crew members who were stranded on board for more than 17 hours on Aug. 6, 1918.

What you might not be as familiar with is the fact that the old scow had company for more than a decade.

The American subchaser Sunbeam was built at the Brooklyn Navy yards in 1917 for the American navy shortly after the United States entered the First World War. When the war ended in 1918, its service as a patrol boat ended and the Sunbeam was declared war surplus and put up for sale. Seymour Lasker purchased the vessel and intended to convert the ship into a private pleasure yacht.

On May 21, 1923, Lasker was joined by three others as he left New York on his way to Lake Michigan where work on the Sunbeam would take place. Unfortunately, Capt. Charles McMahon and his crew made a serious navigational error and turned downriver instead of going west into Lake Erie. Upon realizing their mistake, the crew docked at Chippawa with the intention of returning to Lake Erie the next day.
Read whole article;
https://www.stcatharinesstandard.ca...sat-stranded-in-river-for-more-than-a-decade/
 
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