Notable Residents of Hamilton Beach

scotto

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Feb 15, 2004
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The Beach Strip
#1
From a 2000 City of Hamilton report titled Hamilton Beach Heritage Conservation District.
_______________________________________________

Given the prestige of owning a summer or permanent residence on the Beach, the community was home for a selection of notable citizens. This selection reflects the active civic participation that the Beach has been, and continues to be noted for. Those that are marked with an asterisk (*), are owners of homes within the proposed Hamilton Beach HCD.

Captain Edward Zealand (1793-1869)
Edward Zealand was one of Hamilton's most reputable sailors and schooner captains.1 A veteran sailor of the War of 1812, Zealand also piloted the Rebecca, the first ship to ever pass through the Burlington canal into Hamilton Harbour. By 1840 Zealand was operating a fleet of three cargo schooners that operated in Lake Ontario. Captain Edward Zealand was also a commodore of the Royal Yacht Club.

John Dynes (1816-1899)
In his obituary the Hamilton Spectator referred to John Dynes as the "Best Known and Best Liked Resident on Hamilton Beach".17 John Dynes, like his father Samuel, was the proprietor of the Dynes Hotel, a popular spot for tourists and "famed for its duck dinners and fish suppers". Dynes Tavern is still in operation today.
The Dynes also operated a gristmill on the Beach but, as increasing numbers of tourists visited the area, their lucrative hotel business took precedence over the milling operation. Today, Scallopini's Restaurant at 337 Beach Boulevard resides in what was once The Dynes Tavern, historic landmark on the Beach for over 100 years. This is a reflection of the impact that the Dynes family has had on the community's history.

Francis Edwin Kilvert (1838-1910), 913 Beach Boulevard*
Francis Kilvert was a lawyer and politician. In 1877 Kilvert was elected mayor of Hamilton but left the office in 1878 for federal politics. Between 1878 and 1887 he served as Conservative MP under John A. MacDonald's administration.

Newton D. Gailbreaith (1848-1925), 1117 Beach Boulevard*
Newton Gailbreaith was a real estate speculator and Hamilton philanthropist. Although he spent much of his younger years working at his father's general store, Newton managed to put his earnings into real estate, correctly foreseeing a high demand for land in and around Hamilton. Gailbreaith's contributions to Hamilton's arts and culture and communities are noteworthy. As a proponent of civic beautification, he served as a secretary for the Hamilton Improvement Society, sponsored landscaping and gardening competitions, and encouraged 'green' endeavours like tree planting. Passionate about art, Gailbreaith amassed a private collection of works executed by reputable artists, which he willed to Hamilton's future art gallery (for which he also provided substantial funding).

Adam Zimmerman (1852-1919), 935 Beach Boulevard
Adam Zimmerman was a businessman, entrepreneur, and politician. In 1883, eight years after joining the tailoring firm of Munroe and Henderson, Zimmerman purchased the business. An entrepreneur and innovator, he made this company "one of the most flourishing tailoring establishments in Canada" In 1907, he launched the Zimmerman Manufacturing Co., which produced men's and women's undergarments among other products.
As a public servant, Adam Zimmerman served his adopted home city First, he represented Hamilton as a Liberal MP during Wilfrid Laurier's term as Prime Minister He was also a driving force behind the establishment and construction of the Armoury on James Street North.
Zimmerman's first wife, Isabelle Campbell of Hamilton, died prematurely and his second wife, Jessie, was his first wife's sister. Isabelle and Adam Zimmerman had five children.

Hugh Cossart Baker Jr. (1846-1931), 957 Beach Boulevard*
Hailing from a prominent Hamilton family, Hugh Baker Jr. furthered his family's reputation by actively shaping several of the city's institutions. Before turning thirty years old Baker Jr. helped create the Hamilton Street Railway, the Canada Fire and Marine Insurance Company, and the Hamilton Real Estate Association.
Perhaps the most interesting story about Hugh Cossart Baker Jr. relates to his passion for the game of chess. 4 Prior to 1876 Baker Jr., along with two other colleagues, had telegraph wires strung between their houses in Hamilton so that they could transmit chess moves to one another. In 1877 Baker Jr. upgraded his telecommunication devices to make use of a relatively new invention, the telephone. By the 1880s Baker Jr. had established the Hamilton Telephone Company, later taken over by the Bell Telephone Company, and created the first long-distance telephone line to Dundas. Baker Jr served as manager of Bell's Ontario division until he retired in 1909.

George Elias Tuckett, 1008 Beach Boulevard*
George E. Tuckett, a prosperous tobacconist and active citizen, built a stone mansion on Queen Street South in Hamilton to serve as his principal residence (now the Scottish Rite) but spent his summers on the Hamilton Beach.
George E. Tuckett and partner John Billings founded a tobacco business in 1866; when his partner retired in 1880, his son, George Thomas, joined the
firm.25 George E. Tuckett & Son was later taken over by Imperial Tobacco, which remained in operation until 1966. Tuckett served two terms as councillor for St. Mary's Ward and was elected mayor in 1896. He died in early 1900, leaving his Beach property to his son Charles.

Sir John Gibson (1842-1929), 975 Beach Boulevard.
Sir John Gibson, owner of the Hamilton Beach house known as "Braemar", had a distinguished career as a civil servant and industrialist. It appears that Sir John Gibson likely spent considerable time around Hamilton Beach in his early years. At various times throughout his adolescence and early adulthood Gibson boarded with several relatives, among them Edward Zealand Sr. (see above).
Throughout his political life Gibson held high prestige elected and appointed positions: MLA for Hamilton (1879-1889, 1890-1898); for East Wellington (1899-1905); Ontario's Attorney General (1899-1904); Lieutenant Governor of Ontario (1908-1914).27 Sir John Gibson was also instrumental in shaping Hamilton's industrial base and transportation infrastructure by embarking on such profitable enterprises as the Hamilton Iron and Steel Company (later Stelco), the Hamilton Radial Electric Railway, and the Dominion Power and Transmission Company. In addition, Gibson served as president or member of the board of directors for several other influential companies in the Hamilton region. His influence on the City of Hamilton was considerable and buildings such as the Royal Connaught Hotel and his mansion on Ravenscliffe Avenue serve as reminders of his prominence.
 

David O'Reilly

Registered User
Dec 15, 2012
482
4
18
#2
From a 2000 City of Hamilton report titled Hamilton Beach Heritage Conservation District.
_______________________________________________

Given the prestige of owning a summer or permanent residence on the Beach, the community was home for a selection of notable citizens. This selection reflects the active civic participation that the Beach has been, and continues to be noted for. Those that are marked with an asterisk (*), are owners of homes within the proposed Hamilton Beach HCD.

Captain Edward Zealand (1793-1869)
Edward Zealand was one of Hamilton's most reputable sailors and schooner captains.1 A veteran sailor of the War of 1812, Zealand also piloted the Rebecca, the first ship to ever pass through the Burlington canal into Hamilton Harbour. By 1840 Zealand was operating a fleet of three cargo schooners that operated in Lake Ontario. Captain Edward Zealand was also a commodore of the Royal Yacht Club.

John Dynes (1816-1899)
In his obituary the Hamilton Spectator referred to John Dynes as the "Best Known and Best Liked Resident on Hamilton Beach".17 John Dynes, like his father Samuel, was the proprietor of the Dynes Hotel, a popular spot for tourists and "famed for its duck dinners and fish suppers". Dynes Tavern is still in operation today.
The Dynes also operated a gristmill on the Beach but, as increasing numbers of tourists visited the area, their lucrative hotel business took precedence over the milling operation. Today, Scallopini's Restaurant at 337 Beach Boulevard resides in what was once The Dynes Tavern, historic landmark on the Beach for over 100 years. This is a reflection of the impact that the Dynes family has had on the community's history.

Francis Edwin Kilvert (1838-1910), 913 Beach Boulevard*
Francis Kilvert was a lawyer and politician. In 1877 Kilvert was elected mayor of Hamilton but left the office in 1878 for federal politics. Between 1878 and 1887 he served as Conservative MP under John A. MacDonald's administration.

Newton D. Gailbreaith (1848-1925), 1117 Beach Boulevard*
Newton Gailbreaith was a real estate speculator and Hamilton philanthropist. Although he spent much of his younger years working at his father's general store, Newton managed to put his earnings into real estate, correctly foreseeing a high demand for land in and around Hamilton. Gailbreaith's contributions to Hamilton's arts and culture and communities are noteworthy. As a proponent of civic beautification, he served as a secretary for the Hamilton Improvement Society, sponsored landscaping and gardening competitions, and encouraged 'green' endeavours like tree planting. Passionate about art, Gailbreaith amassed a private collection of works executed by reputable artists, which he willed to Hamilton's future art gallery (for which he also provided substantial funding).

Adam Zimmerman (1852-1919), 935 Beach Boulevard
Adam Zimmerman was a businessman, entrepreneur, and politician. In 1883, eight years after joining the tailoring firm of Munroe and Henderson, Zimmerman purchased the business. An entrepreneur and innovator, he made this company "one of the most flourishing tailoring establishments in Canada" In 1907, he launched the Zimmerman Manufacturing Co., which produced men's and women's undergarments among other products.
As a public servant, Adam Zimmerman served his adopted home city First, he represented Hamilton as a Liberal MP during Wilfrid Laurier's term as Prime Minister He was also a driving force behind the establishment and construction of the Armoury on James Street North.
Zimmerman's first wife, Isabelle Campbell of Hamilton, died prematurely and his second wife, Jessie, was his first wife's sister. Isabelle and Adam Zimmerman had five children.

Hugh Cossart Baker Jr. (1846-1931), 957 Beach Boulevard*
Hailing from a prominent Hamilton family, Hugh Baker Jr. furthered his family's reputation by actively shaping several of the city's institutions. Before turning thirty years old Baker Jr. helped create the Hamilton Street Railway, the Canada Fire and Marine Insurance Company, and the Hamilton Real Estate Association.
Perhaps the most interesting story about Hugh Cossart Baker Jr. relates to his passion for the game of chess. 4 Prior to 1876 Baker Jr., along with two other colleagues, had telegraph wires strung between their houses in Hamilton so that they could transmit chess moves to one another. In 1877 Baker Jr. upgraded his telecommunication devices to make use of a relatively new invention, the telephone. By the 1880s Baker Jr. had established the Hamilton Telephone Company, later taken over by the Bell Telephone Company, and created the first long-distance telephone line to Dundas. Baker Jr served as manager of Bell's Ontario division until he retired in 1909.

George Elias Tuckett, 1008 Beach Boulevard*
George E. Tuckett, a prosperous tobacconist and active citizen, built a stone mansion on Queen Street South in Hamilton to serve as his principal residence (now the Scottish Rite) but spent his summers on the Hamilton Beach.
George E. Tuckett and partner John Billings founded a tobacco business in 1866; when his partner retired in 1880, his son, George Thomas, joined the
firm.25 George E. Tuckett & Son was later taken over by Imperial Tobacco, which remained in operation until 1966. Tuckett served two terms as councillor for St. Mary's Ward and was elected mayor in 1896. He died in early 1900, leaving his Beach property to his son Charles.

Sir John Gibson (1842-1929), 975 Beach Boulevard.
Sir John Gibson, owner of the Hamilton Beach house known as "Braemar", had a distinguished career as a civil servant and industrialist. It appears that Sir John Gibson likely spent considerable time around Hamilton Beach in his early years. At various times throughout his adolescence and early adulthood Gibson boarded with several relatives, among them Edward Zealand Sr. (see above).
Throughout his political life Gibson held high prestige elected and appointed positions: MLA for Hamilton (1879-1889, 1890-1898); for East Wellington (1899-1905); Ontario's Attorney General (1899-1904); Lieutenant Governor of Ontario (1908-1914).27 Sir John Gibson was also instrumental in shaping Hamilton's industrial base and transportation infrastructure by embarking on such profitable enterprises as the Hamilton Iron and Steel Company (later Stelco), the Hamilton Radial Electric Railway, and the Dominion Power and Transmission Company. In addition, Gibson served as president or member of the board of directors for several other influential companies in the Hamilton region. His influence on the City of Hamilton was considerable and buildings such as the Royal Connaught Hotel and his mansion on Ravenscliffe Avenue serve as reminders of his prominence.
Some biographical information



George Elias Tuckett
http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/tuckett_george_elias_12E.html

Sir John Gibson
http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gibson_john_morison_15E.html

Hugh Cossart Baker
 
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