The History of Bell Cairn School

scotto

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From the 1962-63 school year book, many thanks to Bruce Schneider :tbu: for sending this one in.

SCHOOL HISTORY​
The children of the earliest Beach families attended school at Van Wagner's Beach. After the coming of the radial car in 1896, some families chose to send their children to city schools. However, the area was still considered part of the Van Wagner school section and school taxes collected from Beach property owners went toward the support of that section.
In 1907 the Burlington Beach Commission was formed and an agreement was made with the Hamilton Board of Education that Beach children be permitted to attend, city schools on payment of one dollar per month. The cost of tuition and transportation was shared by parents and the commission.
Eight years later the Board, considered it necessary to increase the
school fee to three dollars. The increase was resented by Beach taxpayers but nevertheless, it became effective in January 1916, This bought to the fore once again the urgent need of a school on the Beach.
Supported by the unanimous approval of the Beach residents, the commissioners arranged for the building of a one-room school at station six. The frame building was opened for classes in 1916 with Miss Charlotte Howlet of Flora as principal in charge of all eight grades comprising of about fifty students. The school was known simply as the Beach School, but Douglas Purchase, a student of the first graduation class, suggested that it should be called Beach Bungalow School; this name seemed most appropriate and was adopted.
A second room was added to the school in 1918 and a third in 1922. TO accommodate the increase in enrolment a fourth classroom was opened in 1927, in the Masonic Hall beside the school. A second classroom was arranged there in 1930.
Within very few years the building of additional accommodation had become imperative. The contract for the construction of a brick building was entrusted to James Kemp, a Hamilton contractor, and the corner stone was laid on June 17, 1937 by Mr. George Bethune, the provincial representative for the constituency. Under the corner stone were placed a copy if the Hamilton Spectator, a souvenir of the Coronation of King George VI and a copy of the names of the Commissioners and teaching staff.
The following June the new three-room, red brick building was officially opened by Mr. Duncan McArthur, deputy-minister of Education. In September eight classes began in the enlarged school with an attendance of 255 under the principalship of Mr. W.F. Johnson. Later that year two well equipped rooms for Manual Training and Home Economics were opened.
By 1943 three more classrooms had been added and nine full-time teachers were employed, but the need, for additional accommodation continued, to recur. In August 1950 an extensive building programme commenced when the lakeside wing of our present building began to take shape. During the construction a disastrous fire destroyed the major art of the original frame building and the problem of overcrowded classrooms became more acute than ever forcing immediate revision of the building plans
It was decided to demolish completely the burned wreckage of the teach Bungalow School saving only the bell which at a later date was to
be erected, in its present place of honour on the front lawn; and from it the school derived its name - Bell Cairn Memorial School.
In front of our school is a big iron bell, If you read, the inscription it will tell. The year in which the school was erected, And how the site was selected.
The old school was burned the records say, But the bell was saved for another day, It now sits on a grey cut-stone cairn, Like a sentinel watching each "bairn."
(Composed by Sunny Lea Rusk, 1963)
The corner stone of the auditorium was laid in June 1951 and the extension of the south wing was begun to replace the burned building, before this wing was completed it was realized, that accommodation would soon fall short of requirements once again; to forestall repetition of the problem a large kindergarten room was added to the wing.
The student enrolment continued to increase and in September 1951 half of the spacious auditorium had to be converted into two classrooms. In 1957 two basement rooms had to be utilized and a third, the following year.
It is obvious from the historical account of our school that the present building has resulted from many varied stages of development, and there are further changes to come this summer when it is planned to restore the auditorium to its original size by the removal of the two temporary classrooms which will be relocated in a prefabricated structure.
Chris Langille,
Gayle Brown. Grade 8,


Editor's note:
It has been impossible to do any research in the history of Bell Cairn School without becoming very conscious of the underlying work of Mr. Johnson, who for many years, played such an integral part in the life of the school.
We are proud to include his greetings and felicitations in this first publication of our booklet
 

Fred Briggs

Beach History Moderator
May 27, 2004
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#2
Correcting a few tiny errors.

This very extensive article by Chris Langille and Gayle Brown for the 1962-63 School Yearbook was obviously written with considerable help from the work of John W. Pell, a Wentworth County Public School Inspector (who was also the Inspector for Beach Bungalow School for many years). Many of the sentences have been lifted directly from Pell's writing, which must have been made available to the students long before the publication of his landmark book, History of Stoney Creek Schools, not published until 1991. Somewhere along the way, a few errors, mostly typographical, have crept into the version above.
Just because history is so often "copied" from earlier histories, just as much of this has been, I feel it necessary to make some corrections to prevent mistakes from being repeated repeatedly. Please don't think that I'm just nitpicking. In fact, it would be a good thing if the Moderator of this Forum (that's you, Scotto!) could incorporate the suggested changes in the copy above, because it will continue to be recalled long after this addendum has been lost and forgotten.
1. In the sentence "A second room was added to the school in 1913 ...", the date should have been 1918.
2. The sentence "A contract for the construction of a brick building was entrusted to James Kemp ..." may be accurate or may contain a typo. Mr. Pell's text says "James Kemy". Unfortunately, much of the old, original records are no longer available, so "Kemp" may be correct, and "Kemy" was a typo!
3. In the paragraph beginning "The following June ..." the Principal's name was given as "Mr. W. J. F. Johnson". The "J" could be right, and simply wasn't often used by Mr. Johnson, but I have never seen it used anywhere, and his name was usually given as "Mr. Wm. F. Johnson" or "William F. Johnson".
4. The statement "By 1943 three more classrooms had been added and nine full-time teachers were employed." is a simpllified reworking of Mr. Pell's original sentences "The enrollment at Beach Bungalow School grew rapidly and three classrooms were added. By 1943 there were nine full-time teachers, ..."
Mr. Pell gave no details here about those three new classrooms, and at first it might appear to have been an error by Pell. Yet if there were only 3 classrooms in the old bungalow, and three more in the 1937 brick addition, why and how were 9 full-time teachers employed?
In 1938 Home Economics and Shop Work were introduced. THe shop class was in the school basement and Home Economics went into the old Beach Bungalow. The Beach public school went to Grade 9 at that time, and in 1939 Grade 10 was added. I don't have the records before me at this time, but it is known that Grade One was held in the Masonic Hall from early in the 1940's, an eighth classroom was opened in the school basement in April 1941, and a cottage, in the row of cottages between the school and the Masonic Hall, was rented for a classroom at about that time. I will try to clear this up and come back when I have hard information.
5. There is a simple typo in the sentence "It was decided to demolish completely the burned wreckage of the teach Bungalow School..." Obviously, Beach Bungalow School was meant.
Again, please forgive me for being so picky, but while we are all entitled to our own different opinions, we must have facts with which we can all agree!
 

scotto

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#3
Hi Fred;
I'm just in the middle of changing over computers and I have so much on file that it will take some time.
Typos, I used a scanner to change this article to digital as I don't have the time to re-type every bit of text that comes my way, so I could have even added a couple more changes that may also be incorrect.
There were a few minor spelling changes in the original copy, those were mostly found (spell check doesn't catch everything though) and if the dates have been accidentally juggle over the years, yes it should repaired.
I'm sure Kemp is right as they are still in business and the family is from the Beach.
As for the rest, you were there as an eye witness and you can’t get any better info than that, give me some time with the task at hand and will change what you have suggested.
Your reply post will show others why it has change just in case they have the same year book and wonder why there are differences.
Thanks again for the history lesson.:beer:
 

scotto

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#5
What year did Bell Cairn close?
I was sure there was a thread about this subject, but do you think I can find it. I do see that member Jeannette started a thread about the closing as she was there and had a write up and a picture in the Spec. I remember seeing the article and I must of posted it. But I just don't see it, now I will have to start hunting.

http://hamiltonbeachcommunity.com/forum/showthread.php?t=461
 

scotto

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I was loaned this yearbook again, but this time from the Buta family. I will add more of the pages that I didn't post back in 07.
__________________________________________________________________________

FORWARD​

It is a pleasure for me to write a few words to the Graduating Class of Bell Cairn Memorial School for the year 1962 - '63.
Proficiency in the art of living consists not only in taking advantage of opportunities offered, but also in contributing a little more than your share in service to others. I am sure you will become more aware of the truth of this statement as you pursue your studies in Secondary School.
Canada is a great land of opportunity. There is an important place for you in the future development of our beloved Dominion, if you will prepare for it.
May Divine Providence guide you in all your ways and bless you with an abundance of success and happiness in the years ahead.
L. A. Freeman, Inspector of Public Schools.


PRINCIPAL’S MESSAGE​

It is a pleasure for me to be able to express in the first issue of The Bell my appreciation to those who have made this publication possible. To all who have worked in the preparation of this book, we extend our thanks and congratulations.
June seems to be a time of year when we do a good deal of looking back. We look in retrospect at the many activities which have taken place during the past year, and on later pages are found articles written about some of the phases of our school life. Seeing these all compiled in one place brings us to realize even more fully the great interest and co-operative spirit which must have existed on the part of the students of our senior school. We are also brought to a realization of the extensive amount of planning and guidance which has been involved on the part of our staff. Without both of these our total programme could not have been successful.
In looking to the future we urge all students of all grades to work hard at their academic work, to co-operate well in their other school activities, and above all, to continue to strive to develop* their personal qualities in such a, way that their parents, their teachers, their school, and they themselves may, feel proud of them.
To those who will be in our school next year, let us make Bell Cairn Memorial a school which will proudly serve the needs of its students and of this community.
To our graduates we say, "Best wishes and good luck."
I.V.Thompson,
Principal.
Editorial
 

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scotto

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#9
Editorial​

It is a great honour for me to be appointed the first editor of "The Bell." The compiling of this booklet has been an exacting task end much credit is due to Mrs. Livingstone who initiated the idea and who pioneered the work throughout every phase.
I wish to thank all the teachers and students who have co-operated and contributed to our project to make it such a gratifying success.
Time has been the deciding factor in limiting the contents of this booklet to the senior school activities, but I hope that it may mature into a regular year book representative of the whole school.
If, in future years, this memento helps to revive some cherished memories and associations of our school days in Bell Cairn, it shall have fulfilled its purpose. It is my personal hope that echoes from "The Bell" may perpetuate for many years to come.
Sandra Stewart.
 

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scotto

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#10
GREETINGS FROM A PAST PRINCIPAL​

I extend greetings and best wishes to the teachers and students of Bell Cairn Memorial School. In a very real sense, I still feel that I am a part of your school even though I have been away for three years and have become engrossed in the activities and welfare of another school. The associations and friendships of twenty-three years are very precious to me, and I know that the happy memories of those years will remain with me always.
From time to time I meet members of your staff and students whom I knew so well, and I am heartened by the warmth and sincerity of their greetings. Often too I meet parents and other friends of the Beach, and I find these chance meetings happy re-unions.
As the years pass, I am gratified to learn of the progress and success of former Bell Cairn students. Recently I learned that one had just graduated with high honours from a university in the United States; another has been ordained into, the United Church, and yet another has become a doctor. On my present staff, there is a teacher who was a graduate of this school.
I shall go on hearing reports concerning the advancement of Bell Cairn students within our country and beyond its borders.
I was reluctant to leave your staff in I960, but I found much satisfaction in knowing that the school was to be guided by a worthy successor in the person of Mr. Thompson. I knew too that he would be assisted by a staff of dedicated and efficient teachers. During these past three years, I have followed very closely the progress of your school, and I have been impressed by the active part it has played in the many events sponsored by the Board of Education. Indeed, Bell Cairn continues to be one of the great schools in the city of Hamilton,
To the members of the 1963 graduating class, I send best wishes for success and happiness in the years ahead. May you bring honour to yourselves, to your parent's and to your school.
William F. Johnson.
 

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scotto

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#11
GRADUATION DAY
It's graduation at the "Bell,"
Another class bids us farewell,
Their elementary phase is past,
"Terapus fugit," but time flies fast.
Those who rode the crest of the tide,
Whom teachers seldom had to chide,
May be rather sorry to go
And leave the school and friends they know.
Some had to work when they'd rather not,
Their attitude varied quite a lot.
Study to them was never pleasure,
Still they too came up to measure.
How these students have really changed,
Over night it seems they have saged.
They're honoured graduates today;
How fine they look in their array.
At Delta their realm will be new,
May they excel in fields not few,
Continue to work, pursye their aim
And win for themselves well earned fame.
Charles Steel. Grade 6.







GRADUATION EXERCISES​

Welcome - Introduction of Chairman Mr. I.V. Thompson
Student Chairman Ronald Scoular
Hymn The King of Love
Scripture Reading Merla Kellins
Choral Lord's Prayer Choir
Valedictorian Cynthia Martin
Introduction of Speaker Sandra Stewart
Guest Speaker Miss B. Steven, R.N.
Appreciation Rosemary Sullivan
Choir Now Thank We All Our God
PRESENTATIOM OF AWARDS
Scholarship Awards: Allison Kirk, Annette Le Page, Presented by Mrs. W. Ireland Cynthia Martin, Sandra Stewart
Citizenship Awards: Sharon Buttery, Wendy Rattray
Christine Covill, Sandra Stewart
Presented by Norman Hann, Mary Anne Tait
Mr. D. Scarrow Allison Kirk, Robert Hanson
Gayle Brown, Cynthia Martin
Love Memorial Neil Cowe
Presented by Mr. S. Tomlinson
Masonic Awards Allison Kirk, Brian She1ton
Presented by Mr. F. Iremaine
Literary Award Sandra Stewart
Presented by Mrs. 0. Livingstone
History Award Annette Le Page
Presented by Mr. A.E. Windsor
V.N. Ames Arithmetic Scholarship Cynthia Martin
Presented by Mr. I.V. Thompson
Beach Property Owners' Gold Medal Cynthia Martin
Presented by Mrs. F. Gilchrist
Presentation of School Pins to Graduates
By Mrs. R. Christian and Mrs. A. Clark
Bless This School Choir, Graduates and Audience
VALEDICTORY. June, 1963-
Mr. Chairman, Mr. Thompson, Guests, Teachers, Parents and Fellow Student,
It is a great pleasure and honour for me to be chosen to represent my fellow classmates of the Graduation Class of 1963 and to share with you a few cherished memories of our past eight years at Bell Cairn Memorial School.
On entering kindergarten, the eight years ahead of us seemed like an interminable span of time with many hurdles to cross and many challenges to overcome in preparation for the second important phase of our educational development.
Reflecting on the various school activities, we feel that we have I been extremely fortunate to have had such a diversified programme, which so adequately provided for our individual personal interests. Our sports programme was second to none under the capable management of Miss Lowes and Mr. Scarrow. In the literary and music departments, ample variety was available to allow for our dramatic and creative ability.
Whenever the way seemed difficult and hard, our parents, our principal, and our teachers were ever present to encourage us, to counsel us, and to give us intellectual instruction. Tonight we wish to extend to you publicly and sincerely our thanks and our appreciation for all this help.
Now, as we look forward with great anticipation to our first year .at Delta Secondary School, we trust that we will bring only honour to our parents, to our teachers, to ourselves, and to our first school, Bell Cairn Memorial.
Cindy Martin.
 

scotto

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#12
REFLECTIONS​

Usually, entrance to kindergarten is preceded by registration, a medical checkup, and other formalities. My entrance was very different; it happened by accident. I was playing with my girl friend, Susan Mallon when suddenly her mother appeared and said that she must get ready to go to school. Susan, reluctant to leave me, said that her teacher had promised them they could bring a friend to school that afternoon. My mother consented that I could go.
The teacher looked surprised when I entered the school hand in hand with Susan. I was the 'uninvited guest'; the teacher had never mentioned anything to the children about bringing a friend to school. However, she smiled amusedly and kindly allowed me to stay for the afternoon. We drew pictures, sang songs and did a little bit of counting. School was just as I had expected it to be. How I longed for the time to come when I could attend school regularly.
In September 1956 the big day came. Having had only one short after noon in kindergarten, I was a proud grade one student. The height of my ambition was to be able to write my own name and to read a book for myself. It was during this first year that I had one of my most memor-able experiences. I was selected to represent the grade one in a singing contest. I had always enjoyed music and was simply thrilled to think that I was going to have an opportunity to sing in public. My teacher, Mrs. McCready, taught me the song I was to sing. It was called 'Oh Hear the Merry Clock'. I had no inhibitions and was full of excitement, until I walked onto the stage the afternoon of the contest. Suddenly, I was overcome with fright, I almost ran off the stage. I forgot my words and rendered a very poor performance. I was so young that it did not seem to matter; everybody was willing to make excuses for me and told me I did well.
I have vivid recollections of an interesting trip we had in grade two, when Mrs. Livingstone took the class by bus to Stoney Creek Battlefield where we had a picnic lunch, after which we visited the Children’s Gardens, Dundurn Castle and the Rock Gardens.
In the intermediate grades, work gradually became more difficult and I seemed to have less time to play. When the teacher introduced fractions for the first time, I felt utterly bewildered and confused, and even now I must admit that math is not my forte! Perhaps the highlight of my intermediate years was when once again I had an opportunity to sing a solo at a Home and School meeting. I had profited by my initial experience and had gained sufficient self-confidence so that I was no longer overcome with stage fright.
As I reflect now, I come to the conclusion that my intermediate years were the least exciting; the primary grades seemed to have captured most of the novelty and thrill attached to the presentation of new topics for the first time.
The senior grades brought new challenges and new responsibilities; we were very conscious of the fact that we were expected to set good examples for the junior students.
Grade seven was perhaps my favourite grade when I had my first male teacher, Mr. Otonichar, who was very popular with all the students. During that year he became the proud father of a son, Patrick James. We pleasantly surprised him with a presentation of a baby spoon and an inscribed ring.
Now, nearing the end of grade eight, with graduation only a few weeks away I tend to have mixed feelings. I shall be sorry to leave Bell Cairn Memorial School, where I have accumulated a store of knowledge, which I know is going to be a valuable asset all my life. On the other hand I cannot help but feel a twinge of excitement as I look forward with keen anticipation to entering the more sophisticated phase of my education in high school.
To all my teachers, I feel I owe sincere gratitude for the parts they played in giving me helpful instruction and guidance, and in preparing me to step with confidence through the portals of Delta Secondary School next September.
A grateful student,
Sharron Buttery.
 

scotto

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#13
1963 GRADUATES' PROPHECIES.​

Ten years hence it may be interesting to read the following verses and see how many of our graduates shall have achieved their ambitions.

Linda Ames
Linda Ames, a girl in our class,
Has high hopes that she will pass
To be a teacher is her choice,
When she succeeds, we'll all rejoice.

Shelly Barker
Shelly wants to be a teacher,
But hopes she'll not become a preacher;
She would like to teach a junior class,
And all her students are bound to pass.

Karen Barnhart
My friend, named Karen Barnhart,
Has a nurse's life in mind,
With skilled doctors, she'll play a part,
In relieving suffering of every kind.

Elizabeth Blayney
A proud teacher named Betty Ann,
Will teach her pupils all she can,
She'll be efficient in her school,
And dare a child disobey a rule

Gayle Brown
A secretary Gayle will be
Perhaps in Hudson Bay Company,
It used to be Henry Morgan's store,
But it's not owned by him any more.

Sharron Buttery
To teach kindergarten is Sharron's desire,
She is not interested to go any higher,
Her voice is superb and she loves to sing,
In fact, she's good in almost everything.

Linda Cardwell
A secretary she wants to be,
To sit upon the boss's knee,
She's sure to try
To wipe his eye,
So that Linda he will want to marry.

Chris Covill
Chris Covill, a secretary, oh my!
Do you think she will ever try,
To use her brain,
For greater fame,
Perhaps, she's a little too shy!

John Daniels
John Walter Daniels would like to be
Connected with some kind of industry.
Perhaps a mechanic or engineer,
But he'd do better as a mountaineer!

Bill Davidson
To be an artist is his theme,
He has an eye for colour scheme;
Wee Willy is so small,
He will never be tall,
But his sketches are sure supreme.

Nancy Donovan
Nancy will fly in an aeroplane,
Assist in flight above the terrain,
She'll serve dinner cold
The trays she will hold,
As a stewardess she will make her name.

Larry Dumond
An electrical engineer Larry will be,
But as all of us can plainly see,
By the look on his face,
That will not be the place,
For a dapper person like he.

David Gale
A mechanic, says David Gale,
I'll not have to drive a nail,
I'll use a spanner,
In proper manner,
My locomotives will never fail.

Jacqueline Goldsmith
A secretary Jackie will be,
In spelling she has an A or B,
Dictation she will take carefully,
She will type with great proficiency.

Barbara Haley
Barbara has tried a career to find,
But still has not quite made up her mind,
A teacher she said,
Had entered her head,
I doubt if a contract will ever be signed.

Anita Hamilton
A hairdresser is Anita's ambition,
In training school she'll take tuition,
New styles she'll design,
Make girls look benign,
At her salon they'll line up for admission.

Norman Hann
Norman Hann is the boy's name,
A Phys. Ed. teacher is his aim,
Jumping, hopping and running around,
And turning cartwheels on the ground.

Marion Hannabus
Marion is not very sophisticated,
Her ideas at times are rather belated,
The life of a teacher to her appeals,
Rather than housekeeping or cooking meals.


Bob Hanson
Bob wants to be a doctor,
Or a medical instructor,
He's working hard this year,
For he's bent on this career.

Gary Ikenoto
Gary Ikemoto wants to be an engineer,
Bridges and roads he hopes will appear,
He may plan a ten lane highway,
Who knows? perhaps another skyway.

Don Irvine
Don Irvine will join the navy,
And sail in foreign waters wavy,
His ambition will never be complete,
Till he becomes Admiral of the Fleet.

Teresa Ishmael
Teresa Ishmael is her name,
To be a nurse is her aim,
To earn her psy,
She'll work each day,
Give patients tablets to dull their pain.

Yvonne Jehan
A vet. will be Yvonne's occupation,
She will have no time for relaxation,
Our animal pets will be her patients,
To her the'11 go for inoculations.

Merla Kellins
M is for Merla who will be a vet,
She will tend to many an animal pet,
Their pain and suffering she will ease,
She will never charge exorbitant fees.

Allison Kirk
To MacMaster Allison will go,
In what faculty she does not know,
Perhaps modern languages she will choose,
Because she always minds her P's and Q's.

Lynn Lafave
Lynn Lafave had a dream that was airy,
She wanted to be a legal secretary,
Her spelling was good,
So I think she should
Reach the top of the ladder like a fairy.

Wayne Laking
Wayne wishes to be a mechanic,
So motorists, do not panic,
Under the hood he will take a look,
But never ask him to read a book.

Christine Langille
C is for Chris, a secretary keen,
Her office duties will not be routine,
Initiated, she'll work on her own,
She will type and file and answer the phone.

Jeanne Le Blanc
Jean is slim and quite athletic,
She is lively and energetic,
When to Teachers' College she is led,
It will be her choice to teach Phys. Fd.

Annette Le Page
A legal secretary is Annette’s selection,
This job would suit her to perfection,
She'd report for the lawyer in many court cases,
She's a fabulous memory for people and places.

Donna Linke
Donna will be an efficient nurse,
Or, if not, this will be a false verse,
Sick and feeble on her will depend,
To nervous patients, she'll be a friend.

Neil MacDonald
Neil MacDonald will be a lawyer renowned,
His equals in law will never be found,
His advice when there's a court case on,
Will be on a par with Perry Mason.

Mark Marsden
A clever architect named Mark,
Designed new homes in Marsden Park,
The council announced to one and all,
He's the man for our new city hall.

Cindy Martin
Cindy's music is way above par,
She learned to play an electric guitar,
She'll be a teacher when she graduates,
If her fine ambition perpetuates.

Suzanne McKenzie
To be a Wren is Susan's aim,
And win for herself well earned fame,
She'll travel to countries near and far,
And end her trip at H.M.C.S. Star.

Brian McMillan
Dr. McMillan will be his name,
In medical fields he will earn fame,
He'll read many books on anatomy,
Study hard will be his philosophy.

Gary Millar
Gary would like to be a mechanic,
And work with machines that are automatic,
It would be the height of his intention,
To patent an unusual invention.

Maureen Moodie
An airline stewardess Maureen will be,
She'll apply for a job with B.O.A.C.
In Malton Airport she'll fasten seat belts,
And take off for distant African veldts.

Callum Nell
Callum wants to be a drummer boy,
A drum was Always his choice of toy,
His interest in books may be meagre,
But to be in a band, he's very eager.

Judy Nelson
Judy will be a stenographer,
She'd never be a photographer,
Typing letters will be her main chore,
She'll file invoices and letters galore.

Linda Nicholas
Linda is a meticulous creature,
Her aim in life is to be a teacher,
When her examinations she passes,
She'll teach English and Math to senior classes

George Oldfield
George wants to become an electrician,
This is the height of his ambition,
His knowledge of switch panel formation,
May bring him work in a Hydro station.

Jim Patterson
A survey crew measuring a highway,
Had a boss named Jim who fell off the Skyway,
He landed on his head but he revived,
It's miraculous how he ever survived.

John Popynick
John Popynick will be a skin diver,
In ocean depths he'll have to conniver,
He used to be interested in geography,
Now he's a specialist in oceanography.

Susan Rattray
Susan will be a methodical clerk,
She will always enjoy bookkeeping work,
She is not the type of girl to worry,
Or lose her head when in a hurry.

Norman Rattray
A brave naval officer named Norm,
Will be at sea in many a storm,
The crews' behaviour he will not censure,
A sailor's life is full of adventure.

Wendy Rattray
To be a teacher is Wendy's goal,
Her choice seems a most fitting role,
Work with children she really enjoys,
For her, a child's prank never annoys.

Marjorie Scott
Marjorie will be a lawyer profound,
Her knowledge of law is sure to astound,
She'll plead for justice for people accused,
She will have no personal rights abused.

Marsha Scott
To be a hairdresser is her wish,
Her bouffant styles will look quite swish,
Marsha's customers will be so pleased,
To have their hair tinted, brushed and teased,

Ron Secular
An engineer Ron wants to be,
But this is a vague possibility,
He sits in school,
And acts the fool,
From pretty girls he ne'er can flee.


Brian Shelton
Brian will be an electrical engineer,
His interest was always in that sphere,
He reads all the current magazines,
Concerning the subject of his dreams.

Ross Sommerville
Ross used to have a quarter-midget,
Hours at which he would fidget,
And so we expect for his career,
He'll be a mechanical engineer.

Sandra Stewart
For literature Sandra has a flair,
Someday she'll broadcast over the air,
She'll have a program on C.H.M.L.
Her dramatic talents will serve her well.

Rosemary Sullivan
Rosemary would like to be a botanist,
With the care of flowers she will assist.
Particular plants will make her toil,
To diagnose their types of soil.

Mary Anne Tait
Mary Anne's to be a nurse,
She'll never make her patients worse,
Still don't get sick,
For fear she'd pick
On you to ride in a big black hearse.

Peter Wegerich
Peter was a very quiet lad,
Who seldom divulged the thoughts he had,
Math was always his strongest subject,
To teach may be his future object.
 

scotto

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Feb 15, 2004
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#14
I.V. Thompson, Principal
Another graduation took place in May,
Friday the thirty first was the exact day,
His staff had planned a presentation and tea,
Mr. Thompson received his Master's Degree. (Ambition achieved)
_____________________________________________________________



HOME ECONOMICS​
When we girls were promoted into grade seven we were introduced formally to the subject of Home Economics. This appealed to us because it was novel and even more so because it necessitated travelling, by bus weekly to Queen Mary School.
Last year we studied the basic fundamentals of cooking, sewing, and knitting. The class was divided into two different groups each week, and while one section was cooking, ironing, washing dishes, making beds, and cleaning, the other group was taught the techniques of sewing.
As grade eight, students, our course, included the subjects of entertaining, money managing, baby sitting and the use of a basic pattern. For our first "masterpiece" we selected a blouse. We blundered our way through the whole project, some failed to make accurate adjustments to the pattern, others erred in cutting, pinning and sewing. Our teacher, Miss Reid, helped us over the troublesome hurdles.
The blouses were finally finished in mid-May. They varied in trimmings, having short or long sleeves, printed or plain material. Following this we attempted to make a sheath dress. A few girls found themselves in a maze of threads, cloth and pattern pieces, while others progressed rapidly and had their garments completed and were wearing them within the next week.
The cooking group encountered their problems with the making of salads, and sandwiches, and the cooking of puddings, muffins, and I tea biscuits. We vividly recall the days when the tea biscuits were too salty, when the muffins rose too high, and when the tomatoes fell into the sink adding much flavour to the soup.
Many of us have enjoyed our classes at Queen Mary and intend to continue the Home Economics course at Delta as one of our options.
Merla Kellins

INDUSTRIAL ARTS​
At Queen Mary school, a shield is presented every two months to I the class which achieves the highest percentage in Industrial Arts.
We at Bell Cairn compete against Memorial, Prince of Wales, Queen Mary, Lloyd George and Ballard. Mr. Forester, our Shop teacher, after considering all factors such as attitude, work, clean-up and conduct gives each class a weekly rating in marks. We, the boys of Room 5 have been the sole holder of this shield during the past school year. We attained a percentage of 97.43, a record which has not been bettered in the last four years.
We are very proud of this achievement, but we would also like to recognize the merits of our fellow classmates, who provided us with keen competition.
Brian Shelton

SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS' - Grade 7​
Linda Wintonyk, Jennifer Oughton, Diane May, David Plant, Patsy Budnark, Leonard Walker, Patsy Long, Patsy Leacock, Eric Manchester, Loma De Roches.
CITIZENSHIP AWARDS - Grade 7
Lilli Binder, Chris Chovaz, Jennifer Oughton, Ricky Marsh, Ronald Barker, Pat McPhail, Jane Maybrey, Claus Kessler, Ronald Poole, Patsy Long, Dorly Urfey, Carol Barnhart, Patsy Budnark, Loma De Roches, Gail Gaynik, James Stewart, Gary Gaynik, Mostyn Gunson, Patsy Leacock, Barbara Smith, Eric Manchester, Diane May, David Plant, April Prior.

SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS - Grade 6
Kathleen Toll, Jennifer Brightman, Neil Cowe, Gordon Bauer Keith Barker, Anthony Wise, Joan Mcllroy, David McXenzie, Frank Seattle, Shirley Leacock.

CITIZENSHIP AWARDS - Grade 6
Monique Ballageer, Jennifer Brightman, Georgette Trebyck, Frank Seattle, Ann Church, Dorothy Bulbeck, Leon Buta, Ted Cranwell, Diane Christian, Andrew Camani, Neil Cowe, David McKenzie, Anthony Wise, Dawn Smith, Gordon Bauer, Gloria Emery, Keith Barker, Alan Graham, Karen Rogers.
 

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David O'Reilly

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Dec 15, 2012
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#16
scotto
03-13-2007, 07:02 PM


Scott, is there a typo in this post? The word 'art' doesn't seem to make any sence. Okay now I see, I think the letter 'p' was left out. So it should have been 'part'?

In August 1950 an extensive building programme commenced when the lakeside wing of our present building began to take shape. During the construction a disastrous fire destroyed the major art of the original frame building and the problem of overcrowded classrooms became more acute than ever forcing immediate revision of the building plans
 

David O'Reilly

Registered User
Dec 15, 2012
482
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#17
scotto
03-13-2007, 07:02 PM
From the 1962-63 school year book, many thanks to Bruce Schneider :tbu: for sending this one in.


A second room was added to the school in 1918 and a third in 1922. TO accommodate the increase in enrolment a fourth classroom was opened in 1927, in the Masonic Hall beside the school. A second classroom was arranged there in 1930.
Within very few years the building of additional accommodation had become imperative. The contract for the construction of a brick building was entrusted to James Kemp, a Hamilton contractor, and the corner stone was laid on June 17, 1937 by Mr. George Bethune, the provincial representative for the constituency. Under the corner stone were placed a copy if the Hamilton Spectator, a souvenir of the Coronation of King George VI and a copy of the names of the Commissioners and teaching staff.

________________________________________


When Bell Cairn was torn down, was the copy of the Hamilton Spectator, the souvenir of the Coronation of King George VI and the copy of the names of the Commissioners and teaching staff." Saved? Where are they now?
 

scotto

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Feb 15, 2004
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#18
scotto



When Bell Cairn was torn down, was the copy of the Hamilton Spectator, the souvenir of the Coronation of King George VI and the copy of the names of the Commissioners and teaching staff." Saved? Where are they now?
Good question and I would have no idea who would of taken possession of the memorabilia, going have to add that to the list of things to watch for as it would be Beach history.
 

scotto

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 15, 2004
6,985
218
63
The Beach Strip
#20
scotto
03-13-2007, 07:02 PM
From the 1962-63 school year book, many thanks to Bruce Schneider :tbu: for sending this one in.


A second room was added to the school in 1918 and a third in 1922. TO accommodate the increase in enrolment a fourth classroom was opened in 1927, in the Masonic Hall beside the school. A second classroom was arranged there in 1930.
Within very few years the building of additional accommodation had become imperative. The contract for the construction of a brick building was entrusted to James Kemp, a Hamilton contractor, and the corner stone was laid on June 17, 1937 by Mr. George Bethune, the provincial representative for the constituency. Under the corner stone were placed a copy if the Hamilton Spectator, a souvenir of the Coronation of King George VI and a copy of the names of the Commissioners and teaching staff.

________________________________________


When Bell Cairn was torn down, was the copy of the Hamilton Spectator, the souvenir of the Coronation of King George VI and the copy of the names of the Commissioners and teaching staff." Saved? Where are they now?
I should of read this better or put a bit more thought into the answer, Bell Cairn School was never torn down and the corner stone is still there. I should of known that.
 
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