From Outlet to Canal

Drogo

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#61
Drogo, when the concrete piers replaced the timber cribs,do you know if they were built on the inner, or outer sides? If they were built on the outer sides, do you know what the method was to prevent the sand from falling in to the excavated trench? And do you know when this work took place, and if the canal was widened at that point?

David other than the news article I typed and the first hand knowledge of rock retaining walls I know little of the further contruction of the Canal. I don't know if they poured inside or outside or capped over to encase the rocks.
 

scotto

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#62
The only one I'm thinking of on the north side and not really at the outlet was The Ship's Inn. At least I think that was the name.
I see in Ray Mifflin's book Harbour Lights that the Lakeside Hotel was originally the Ship's Inn.
Page 53; The Lakeside Hotel at the canal was originally built by Philip McGee during the 1830's and was known as the Ship's Inn.
 

scotto

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Here is a news paper article from 1825 that indicates that the work on the Burlington Canal was well under way.
http://images.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/9872/data
p.2 from the York Observer.
Sept. 6, 1825
Mr. Editor,

The occasion of my addressing you must form my only apology for this communication, which I hope may not be considered out of place.

It has perhaps seldom occurred for years past that so violent a storm has been experienced in the upper part of Lake Ontario, as was witnessed the past week. It commenced on Tuesday and continued with unabated violence, until the after part of Sunday. During that period, several vessels were under the necessity of coming to an anchor by stress of weather near Burlington Beach. Yet it is a matter of consolation that less damage was sustained than might with the greatest propriety have been anticipated in that portion of the Lake. The Breakwater or protecting pier of the harbour at Burlington Bay, being placed in seventeen feet water, sustained much less injury than might have been expected by those who are not aware of its permanence. It being in an unfinished state, although it is rapidly progressing. A few cords of stone were washed out by the swells that rolled over it; there being no deck, nor the height being complete as is intended when finished. Six sticks of timber were beat off from one of the cribs of the south wing; being all the damage that those works have sustained, that I can learn, except two scows belonging to the contractor of that work which drifted ashore and were somewhat injured. The permanence of the works is now established beyond a doubt in the minds of the most incredulous, who have visited them and pretended to express an opinion. One schooner, viz. "The Rebecca and Eliza" belonging to William Chisholm Esq. moored within the harbour on the first day of the storm and rode there in perfect safety during its continuance.

Another, viz. "the Julia," was driven on shore within half a mile of the Breakwater, having rode out in the storm until she became too much disenabled to make the harbour. The present prospect of a good harbour and safe mooring situated at the most dangerous extremity of the Lake may well be a source of gratification to the owners and masters of vessels, as well as to the inhabitants in general within its vicinity.

A Subscriber.
 

David O'Reilly

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#66
Drogo
11-09-2013, 02:03 PM
It was the original intention to locate the “Burlington Bay Canal” a mile further south than the present cut, in order to give vessels an offing to northward to work in, should they fail in making the mouth of the canal in an west blow, but local interest on the north shore, and a shorter cut drew it to the present site. A similar mistake was made in locating the Welland Canal, for which Clews & Son, eminent engineers, surveyed a route between a point near the mouth of the Grand River, and Burlington Bay-descending the mountain at a break twelve miles east of Hamilton at Bowslough’s-thence to Lottridge’s pond and the bay. It was in vain that the cheapness of the route, its distance from the U.S. frontier and the capacity of the Burlington Bay, etc, were argued-local interest drew the canal to its present unsatisfactory route. But to return to our Burlington Canal; an American gentlemen, Mr. Strowbridge, was understood to be the contractor; a large sum of money had been appropriated by the Government. Mr. Strowbridge commenced operations, but, saw directly that the appropriation was too small. Mann & Spohn then took the contract with a farther appropriation. They carried the work to completion, not however, without another additional grant and reducing themselves to bankruptcy.

The commencement of the work was very simple; wagons and carts were used to remove the sand above the water level; then a huge scow with gearing driven by relays of four horses, scooped up the sand by means of endless chains revolving on drums, to which buckets were attached in such a way that, on rising to a certain height they cast their contents into false-bottomed scows, which, alternately were loaded and discharged their burden in deep water in the bay. When a sufficiently large opening was made, cribs of timber only twelve feet in width were sunk and filled with stones gathered along the shore of the lake.

The expenditure of money at the works soon built up quite a village, and farmers found a ready market for their produce, many of whom laid the foundation of their future comfort and independence from their sales the works. A scow ferry was kept up for a long time by Philip Magee, whose descendants own the present scow (plus 3 more words cut off) which the Government ungenerously taxes a large yearly sum under the pretext that the house stands within the canal limits, when in fact Magee was located there before the canal was begun, and limits were not thought of till long after his death. In time a swinging bridge was erected by Nathan Goodell, assisted by Henry Lutz, of Saltfleet, on the south side of the canal, reaching across the span of seventy feet; a light-house and beacon built of wood fire, after standing a number of years, and made room for the present substantial structure.

Here is a page with some information on the disagreements between the Burllington Canal commissioners and Strowbridge.

Showing record 1 of 1



A memorial presented to His Excellency the Lt. Governor [electronic resource] / by James G. Strowbridge.
Main Author: Strowbridge, James G.

Language(s): English
Published: [Toronto? : s.n.], 1827
Subjects: Canaux > Ontario.
Canals > Ontario.
Burlington Bay Canal (Ont.).
Burlington Bay Canal (Ont.).

Note: Tables.
"And several documents relating to the works and the disagreement between the commissioners and the contractor."
ISBN: 0665567960
Locate a Print Version: Find in a library


http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/100285707
 

David O'Reilly

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#67
Drogo
11-09-2013, 02:03 PM
It was the original intention to locate the “Burlington Bay Canal” a mile further south than the present cut, in order to give vessels an offing to northward to work in, should they fail in making the mouth of the canal in an west blow, but local interest on the north shore, and a shorter cut drew it to the present site. A similar mistake was made in locating the Welland Canal, for which Clews & Son, eminent engineers, surveyed a route between a point near the mouth of the Grand River, and Burlington Bay-descending the mountain at a break twelve miles east of Hamilton at Bowslough’s-thence to Lottridge’s pond and the bay. It was in vain that the cheapness of the route, its distance from the U.S. frontier and the capacity of the Burlington Bay, etc, were argued-local interest drew the canal to its present unsatisfactory route. But to return to our Burlington Canal; an American gentlemen, Mr. Strowbridge, was understood to be the contractor; a large sum of money had been appropriated by the Government. Mr. Strowbridge commenced operations, but, saw directly that the appropriation was too small. Mann & Spohn then took the contract with a farther appropriation. They carried the work to completion, not however, without another additional grant and reducing themselves to bankruptcy.

Upper Canada Herald (Kingston, ON), 18 Mar 1829

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p.2 House of Assembly - John Macaulay's report as President of the Commissioners on Internal Navigation, with account of monies expended.
7th March - petition of James G. Strowbridge, contractor on Burlington Canal, is discussed and referred to Committee of Supply.
http://images.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/67252/data?n=4

so I wonder exactly when Mr. Strowbridge left the picture, and when Mann and Spohn entered it. And I would like to know exactly how much work Strowbridge completed.

1829 - "The still-unfinished Burlington Canal had sufficient depth of water and the passage of schooners inbound with general cargo and outward bound with wheat and flour was frequent."

http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?I
D=Y1829
 

David O'Reilly

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#68
Drogo
11-09-2013, 02:06 PM
On the opening of the canal the whole population of the surrounding country, and many from a distance came to witness the success of the great achievement. The weather was all that could be desired, and in the afternoon a schooner, crowded with passengers eager to share the glory of the first passage, was hauled out from a recess in the southwest pier, and warped through the canal; though she got aground several times and the passengers ran from side to side across the deck to ease her keel, which stuck fast in the sand. If my memory serves me, she was called the “Ann and Jane”, and was in charge of Captain Zealand. A small stubby American steamer had come up from Queenston, and being of light draught, offered to run through the canal, but was not permitted until a British vessel had gone through first. Cheer after cheer followed the Ann and Jane, as she spread her white wings to the gentle breeze-the first Vessel to pass through the Burlington Bay Canal and navigate the Bay?

We may say, en passant, that the original canal was rather a diminutive affair; the piers were narrow and short; on the lake side were recesses for vessels to lie in, and also for the purpose of giving a broader base to the piers, and strengthening them on the storm side. But this arrangement was found to produce an eddy which formed bars in the canal. There was also a breakwater, made of a considerable number of piles, at the mouth of the canal; this, too, was found to be useless, besides being on some occasions an obstruction to vessels entering the canal.

To-day we may smile in our conceit at the simplicity of the original designers and contractors, in attempting, with such imperfect appliances, and without experience, so great a work; just as those who follow us may smile at our simplicity in continuing to use a scow ferry, instead of laying a railroad track across the bottom of the canal on which we could run a car ferry above water, and have it at all time safe and at a proper level.

January 24th, 1881 (signed) Hans.

so obviously when the Burlington Canal opened, the age of steam had already begun. And so for some time, both schooners and steamers would pass through the canal. But as the years went by, there would be fewer schooners, and more and more steamers. And as steamers could travel more quickly, and weren’t at the murcy of the wind, it seems that the schooners had to be hauled through the canal.

“There was a hot time at the Canal on Friday, 30 May. The Spectator had this to say:
"The piers at the Canal have had many escapes from being consumed by fire during the last two or three years, the cause generally being sparks from passing steamers. Friday was a particularly bad day on account of the very high wind which prevailed and the north pier took fire, near the west end about half past two in the afternoon, the general feeling being that it was caused by the steamer FLORENCE. It was observed by Capt. Campbell shortly after it started and he, along with several citizens of the Beach, proceeded with their buckets, as they had done many times before, to the scene of the blaze. This time, however, their efforts were in vain. The flames spread along the pier with amazing rapidity and it was soon apparent that something more than this primitive style of firefighting was needed. The wind blew burning embers along the pier, starting numerous fires and forcing the retreat Of Capt. Campbell and his crew. About 3:00 p.m. the steamer ECLIPSE came into the canal and landed her passengers. She then crossed over and with her crew manning their fire-hose, began to make some progress until she had to leave to tow some schooners through the Canal.”

http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1879




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David O'Reilly

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#69
Here is a 1826 news paper article that reported the celebrations that took place with the opening of the canal.

Kingston Chronicle (Kingston, ON), 14 Jul 1826



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p.2 the Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada, Sir Peregrine Maitland, visits the canal to Burlington Bay.
Opening of the Burlington Canal.
This ceremony took place on Saturday the 1st instant, and the novelty of such a thing in U. Canada attracted a number of people, from different parts of the country.
The Gore Militia was called out, and furnished a Guard of Honour, which received His Excellency the Lieutenant Governor. The Bands of the 70th Regiment was also in attendance.
His Excellency with the Canal Commissioners in a Barge, passed through the Canal uniting the waters of Ontario with the Burlington Lake.... [U.E. Gazette]”
http://images.maritimehistoryoftheg... clippings&rows=40&sort=dateSort+desc&v=t&g=g
 

David O'Reilly

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#70
Here is a 1830 Kingston News Paper article on the Burlington Canal.

"Burlington Canal - A Gentleman who has lately passed through the Burlington Canal, in one of the Steam Boats, assures us that the passage was without interruption or any difficulty whatever. The sand has been cleared out with a dredging machine. That was found to be necessary; for the angular and irregular shape of the Canal produces eddies, and occasions a deposit of sand. To remedy that inconvenience, the Canal is to be straightened and made of a uniform width throughout. A contract is entered into for that purpose. There are two wharves at Burlington Lake, at the Hamilton landing, where passengers and freight are taken on board. When the Desjardins Canal shall be completed, Steam Boats will be able to go up to Dundas, passing through Burlington Lake or Bay and the water called Coote's Paradise, which has a navigable channel. From Dundas there will be a direct road to Guelph and Waterloo."

1830 Kingston News Paper article on the Burlington Canal.

I'm surprised to read that the canal wasn't originally straight.
I wonder if there are sketches anywhere of the canal that were made at this time.

http://images.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/9910/data
 

David O'Reilly

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#71
Drogo
11-09-2013, 03:02 PM
I'm posting this in a few messages as it is a transcript of a Spectator article from 1881, too long for one post. It isn't about Canal Bridges or the Outlet itself but supplies answers to some questions on both.

http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz256/scotto2010/Misc/Outlet_zpsok4yk344.jpg (http://s833.photobucket.com/user/scotto2010/media/Misc/Outlet_zpsok4yk344.jpg.html)
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Drogo
11-09-2013, 03:03 PM
Appeared in the Spectator Jan. 28, 1881

THE BURLINGTON CANAL

Incidents Attending Its Construction
(Written for the Spectator)

The building of the Burlington Canal was a big event, and the inquisitive inhabitants for many miles round about, as curiosity or Business called them, did not lose an opportunity of watching the progress of the work. Small spritsail boats and bateaux had passed occasionally through the natural outlet from the bay, when the mouth was not closed up with sand by easterly storms: but when an artificial passage through the beach was contemplated it was considered the eighth wonder of the world. How was it possible for so great a work to be accomplished? How was the drifting sand to be kept in check, or how could it be dug out? At all small gatherings of the people-at bees and visiting parties the subject was discussed; neighbourhood dispute and gossip were forgotten in the presence of this great enterprise; the general opinion being that it must end in disappointment. Why, the beach was all sand, the accumulation of the and blown material brought thither by easterly storms during centuries past, which, being deposited at first as a bar, had in the end risen above the surface; and as no westerly blows could disturb it, or carry it away, the result was the present ever widening beach.

The simple inhabitants were greatly exercised over the magnitude of this wild project; they had seen again and again the pent-up waters of the bay rise above the level of the lake, and sweep away the great sandbars at the outlet; and again they had seen the bellowing, raging, east storms heap immense banks of sand across its mouth, and stop the flow of what, only a few days before, was a great river; therefore, how was it possible to construct a work capable of resisting these mighty forces and secure a channel always open to admit the passage of vessels? To attempt such a thing seemed as chimevical (unreadable ?) as King Canute’s attempt to check the flow of the tide. Notwithstanding, there were a few great men scattered about, among the people in those days, who appeared to think otherwise- men who had seen Montreal, once at least, and York (Toronto) many times. They were not like the modest, vote-seeking great men of today-but bold, outspoken men, confident; men who swelled out their bosoms like poater (?) pigeons, and hoarsely cleaned out their throats before speaking, and deposited the contents in their pocket kerchiefs, and spreading wide their feet, delivered their borrowed opinions to the gaping listeners-stopping occasionally to snort loudly through their noses, by way of confirming the importance, and the undying correctness of their opinions. They, with heads as empty as bellows, had the honor of an introduction to certain great engineers in Montreal, and they had said, “The projected plan for cutting through the Beach and securing an uninterrupted passage for vessels was practical.” This was final, no further information was necessary. Happy day when the masses pinned their faith in all things to the sleeves of those above them.”

I’ve found a page that gives just a snippitt of information , on how priore to the construction of the Burlington Canal, freight that was destened for Hamilton had to be unloaded from ships and transferred across the beach, and then reloaded in to smaller boats to be taken across the bay. It isn’t much, but hopefully it will encourage others to add more on this topic.

“George Hamilton sub-divided part of his farm into village lots, which, as a result of his masterful salesmanship, were soon taken up. This was a singularly unattractive place for a village. It was separated from the Bay by dense swampy forest and, it lacked the other great advantage enjoyed by many pioneer settlements - a good stream to turn the wheels of industry. It was situated on an existing trail through the bush. With this meagre item on the credit side of the ledger, its growth must be slow indeed. It would be a place where the weary traveller might find a tavern where he could rest himself and his horse; where nearby farmers could barter their garden produce for some of the imported necessities on the shelves of the general store, and where any industry would be "cottage industry", to the accompaniment of the clicking of the spinning wheel and the thump of the loom.
The first merchant to locate in the village of Hamilton, as it was so designated in 1813, was William B. Sheldon, who had a store in the vicinity of King and John Streets. Since there was no road between the village and the Bay, and since shipmasters were not likely to use the natural outlet, which could be blocked by gravel during Easterly gales, it was necessary for cargo and passengers to be landed on Burlington Beach. Therefore, Sheldon had to build a storehouse on the Beach, where he could receive his imported goods, which came from Oswego and Montreal. At this point, every item, whether it be a box of tea, a hogshead of sugar, a bale of cloth, a cask of wine or a keg of nails, had to be brought ashore in a small boat and stored, prior to being hauled by horse over the primitive road to the village, a distance of about 10 miles. This may sound pretty crude in this age of sophisticated communication and transport, but let us look to the East and see what took place before the cargo reached the Beach.”

http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=S1
 

scotto

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#72
Here is a 1830 Kingston News Paper article on the Burlington Canal.

1830 Kingston News Paper article on the Burlington Canal.

I'm surprised to read that the canal wasn't originally straight.
I wonder if there are sketches anywhere of the canal that were made at this time.
I took a picture of a large sketch that author Ray Mifflin was showing at a Beach meeting and it wasn't straight at all, it also showed a wall some distance out in the lake. This may of been a try at stopping the high waves or to slow the silting of the canal.
Also of interest, the map is labeled "Port of Hufkifson", I have no idea why.




I have also attached a larger copy;
 

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David O'Reilly

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#73
Here is something on a tramway that was built to bring stone from the Niagara Escarpment for the piers.

the Burlington Bay Canal was commenced in 1823 and completed in 1826, the width being only thirty feet. Prior to the building of this canal Ancaster was the county-seat, having in 18 18 twenty prosperous stores; but many of her most enterprising business people, such as Edward Jackson, Richard and Samuel Hatt, etc., removed to Hamilton on the opening of the said canal. Afterwards, in 1846, the canal was greatly widened. The contractor for the job, in order to bring stone for the piers from the north mountain, near Waterdown, built a tramway. This tramway equipment was afterwards sold to Andrew Miller, who had a project to build a canal from the bay up the ravine in rear of the Spring Brewery to the intersection of Bay and York streets.”

http://www.forgottenbooks.com/readb...e_Hamilton_Association_1883_v6_1000597265/165
 

David O'Reilly

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#74
The Burlington Bay Canal may be considered a branch of the main line of the St. Lawrence navigation. It was a half-mile long cutting with no locks through a piece of low land which partly separated Lake Ontario from a large sheet of deep water called Burlington Bay. This canal enabled vessels to reach both the city of Hamilton and the Desjardins Canal65 leading to the town of Dundas. Burlington Bay, lying at the upper end of Lake Ontario, was almost entirely separated from the latter by a sand bar 6 miles long and 300 feet wide. It contained several good landing places and the importance of opening a navigable channel through it to Lake Ontario became apparent at an early date.
On 19 March 1823, a Bill was passed in the Upper Canada legislature authorizing the construction of a navigable canal between Burlington Bay and Lake Ontario.66 Commissioners were appointed to carry out the construction of this canal, and in 1825 they reported that they had received the services of Mr. Hall as engineer and had entered into contracts with a firm of contractors who agreed to complete the work by 1 October 1825, for the sum of $34,000.67 Unfortunately difficulties arose between the contractors and the commissioners. This retarded the progress of the works which were not completed until 1832. From then until the union in 1841, the works appear to have been extended gradually every year and the channel to have been deepened. The amount expended on this canal up to 1841 was £31,089.0.5 ($124,356.08).68
After the union the canal was placed under the care of the Board of Works whose chairman reported that this canal was in a ruinous and dilapidated condition. In 1843 the board commenced some improvements here which were finished in 1850.69 These works consisted of the deepening, straightening and widening of the artificial channel then in use; the lining of the sides of the channel with cribwork filled with stone, and the establishment of a ferry over the channel. In 1855 the outer end of the south pier was extended 300 feet into Lake Ontario, and the river end of the south pier was extended 50 feet into the bay.70 The expenditure by the Department of Public Works on the construction of the Burlington Bay Canal from the union in 1841 up to confederation was $291,044.49.71 The total cost of the canal from the time of its commencement in 1825 to 1 July 1867, was $432,684.40.72

http://parkscanadahistory.com/series/chs/8/chs8-1j.htm
 

scotto

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I have a sketch and the Caddy painting, both show some resemblance of the lake piers as shown in the Mifflin drawing. The Caddy painting shows the south pier (lake side) as being much longer, the view is from the end of the south pier, so you cannot see the end of the south pier but end of the north pier is seen. The view does not show if there is a wall or not. The sketch show some fortifications near the old pier and the north pier is shorter than the south, but no wall in the lake. This is only a drawing.
 

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scotto

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#78
From the Chronical & Gazette

December 23, 1843.
BURLINGTON BAY CANAL

The works of this Canal were in such a wretched state of dilapidation, as to threaten the stoppage of the navigation. The first operation, therefore, upon it at the commencement of this season, was to stop the breaches which the sea had made, and to put it into such a state of repair as would keep it serviceable until the new works were completed.
With regard to proper location of this work, some difference of opinion has existed, originating in part from local interest, and partly from the greater advantage which other positions than the present one appeared to some to hold out.
Three sites have been spoken of. First, one close to the north shore, the line passing through Brant's Pond. The advantages urged in favor of this line are, that it is defensible, in case of war, from the shore; that its entrance would be in quiet water; that the bottom would be in clay; and that in thick and foggy weather vessels could make the entrance by around ngs.
The disadvantages are that from its being so close in shore, to all vessels except those propelled by steam, great inconvenience would thereby frequently be presented; that the slightest mistake being made in the management of vessels making for the entrance, their going on shore would be certain. The work should necessarily be much longer, and the expense of constructing it would be nearly double that of the line adopted.
The second site, in favour of which arguments are adduced, is that of the old outlet. The chief reason urged for the adoption of this place is that the water of the Lake there is usually more quit than that of the present Canal.
The third site is that of the existing work. After a careful examination of all the advantages and disadvantages of each site, and ascertaining the opinion of the most intelligent naval men acquainted with this Lake, the Board had no hesitation in adopting the last mentioned, for the following reasons:
Experience has proved that the in and out flow of the waters are but sufficient to keep one channel open, if the natural outlet became blocked up with deposit, in proportion as the waters were permitted to flow through the artificial channel; and on the completion of the latter, the former was altogether stopped up.
If it were attempted to have the present Canal open for the accommodation of while a new one was being dredged, there is no question but that the former would close up, or the latter be re-filled, according to the direction of the winds which might from time to time prevail.
The difficultly of entering the present Canal is caused, not by the rough water, but by the dilapidated state of the work, by its total insufficiency as to width, (but 56 feet,) and by the cross sea, caused by the irregular line of the Piers, the central of the helm being thereby lost.
A large portion of the expense in the construction of such work is, that in weather at all rough, the operations must in a great measure be suspended; the dredge and scows brought from their berths into shelter; and the establishment, although doing nothing in a great measure, kept on at cost. By adopting the present position, this difficulty is materially lessened, as shelter will be afforded by the existing work, and advantage will be had of a large portion of this work, (on which about £40,000 have been expended) not only during the operations, but as a breakwater and permanent protection to the new work; whereas, by fixing on any other location, the whole of the former outlay would be useless.
Finally, the present line is the shortest from deep water to deep water; and by adopting it in preference to any other, a savings is effected of about £20,000.
The preparations made for this work, arc the construction of a train road from the quarries to the Canal, a distance of about 5 1/2 miles, by means of which suitable stone can be quarried, loaded, and delivered at the work for 9s. 4d. per cord, and the certain supply ensured. The propositions received for furnishing the stone from other quarters vary from 23s. 9d. to 30s. per cord.
That which is prepared in the same neighborhood, for the purpose of the University of King's College at Toronto, I understand costs 5s. per ton for its transport alone, from the quarry to the Lake, a distance of but 3 1/2 miles, at which rate the carriage of s cord of stone comes to 30s.
The right to procure as much stone as shall be required for the works has been obtained from the Rev. Mr. Greene, the occupier of the Clergy Reserve on which the quarry is situated, for the sum of £60, being less than one penny per cord.
The sum paid for the quarry right of the stone required for the macadamizing of the Hamilton and Brantford Road, was not less than 1s. 3d. per cord. A large quantity of timber has been delivered by contract, and considerable progress will be made in the works this winter.
 

scotto

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#79
From the book "Burlington, Memories of Pioneer Days by Dorothy Turcotte.

Jabez's son George (Bent) followed in his father's footsteps in the masonry trade. After a spark from a steamer set fire to the wooden lighthouse and the lighthouse-keeper's house, as well as the pier and the ferryman's cottage, at the canal in 1856, the Bents were chosen to build the new brick home for the lighthouse-keeper. The house can still be seen near the old lighthouse at the canal lift bridge and was continuously occupied by lighthouse-keepers until its last resident was declared redundant in 1987. The house is on Hamilton's Local Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee's list of important heritage properties.
 
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