Hamilton Beach Trail gets buggy

scotto

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Staff member
Feb 15, 2004
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The Beach Strip
#1
This is an article from last year at this time reporting the increase in swarms of flying mosquito like bugs called midges. If you have been on the Trail near the cut-off or worst near the canal, you would notice how bad it is this year. I don't recall a problem last year.
News May 15, 2017 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News



If you’ve been walking the Hamilton Beach Trail recently you can’t help but notice the swarms of bugs just about everywhere.
“It’s in conjunction with the high water,” said Lisa Jennings, an aquatic ecologist at the Hamilton Conservation Authority.
Jennings noted the recent spell of rain mixed with mild temperatures is perfect for nonbiting midges, a species of fly that thrives in wetlands and is attracted to the carbon dioxide emitted by people and animals.

“They’re very important for fish in the area,” said Jennings.
She said the fly eggs were laid over the winter and the new flies will likely stick around until temperatures warm up and the flooded lakeshore areas dry up.
“Into June, you’ll see it quiet down,” Jennings said.



by Mark Newman
Mark Newman is a Reporter for Mountain News. He can be reached at mnewman@hamiltonnews.com

Email: mnewman@hamiltonnews.com


More from the CBC;

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/toronto-faces-invasion-of-midges-1.2632675
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A truck parked near the canal;
 

Opie

Registered User
Mar 1, 2017
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The Beach Strip
#2
This is an article from last year at this time reporting the increase in swarms of flying mosquito like bugs called midges. If you have been on the Trail near the cut-off or worst near the canal, you would notice how bad it is this year. I don't recall a problem last year.
News May 15, 2017 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News



If you’ve been walking the Hamilton Beach Trail recently you can’t help but notice the swarms of bugs just about everywhere.
“It’s in conjunction with the high water,” said Lisa Jennings, an aquatic ecologist at the Hamilton Conservation Authority.
Jennings noted the recent spell of rain mixed with mild temperatures is perfect for nonbiting midges, a species of fly that thrives in wetlands and is attracted to the carbon dioxide emitted by people and animals.

“They’re very important for fish in the area,” said Jennings.
She said the fly eggs were laid over the winter and the new flies will likely stick around until temperatures warm up and the flooded lakeshore areas dry up.
“Into June, you’ll see it quiet down,” Jennings said.



by Mark Newman
Mark Newman is a Reporter for Mountain News. He can be reached at mnewman@hamiltonnews.com

Email: mnewman@hamiltonnews.com


More from the CBC;

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/toronto-faces-invasion-of-midges-1.2632675
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

A truck parked near the canal;
Went for a walk down to the pier on the weekend to get a break from the gnats, took this picture of light beacon. You can see at the bottom the piled up dead gnats and if you can zoom in, you will see the wall is covered. Just need a few more days of hot weather to zap them.

 
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scotto

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 15, 2004
6,431
45
48
The Beach Strip
#3
If you walk across the sidewalk on the bridge, they now part of the concrete. I assume the piers would be the same.
As I replied to an email, it reminds me of the old history book story when the trains couldn't move because there were so many of them on the tracks that it was like grease.
 
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