Ojibwa Sub

scotto

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#21
Who knows we might get the snow like the east coast is getting now. Poor east coast, like they didn't have enough to deal with already. Nasty mother nature seems to be on the warpath lately.
Then it might be next spring before it leaves, we should get some good weather before winter gets here.





 

Sharla1

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#23
That's really going to look great when it's all done. Too bad it isn't going to stay here in our city.

Too bad Halifax neglected it. Just like Toronto did with the Haida.
 

scotto

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#29
Here is the pic of yours that shows the number 72. And it was on there in 1972 when I last saw it.
It is there, now I will have to check the picture of other subs. Not very big though, when on the naval ships, it is very easy to see.
BTW, the sub leaves early tomorrow morning at 3am.









 

scotto

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#31
I was hoping it was going to leave in the daylight hours.
It was dark and foggy, with the sub moving it made for a crappy picture. Yes during the the day would of been nice for some pictures. There were many others there taking photos as well.




Here is a picture taken in 1965 with the number 72 displayed a little better than in the photo I took, the pic was borrowed from here;
http://courcy.ca/ojibwa.htm




Another picture of the crew, this is from the Port Burwell museum.
 

scotto

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#32
This was sent in today.

See the attached flyer about submarine OJIBWA. She is the sister of submarine ONONDAGA.

As of July 6, 2013, Rimouski Quebec will no longer be the only place in Canada where a submarine museum is located. Submarine OJIBWA will join her sister, submarine ONONDAGA, as a submarine museum and will open her doors at Port Burwell, Ontario.

Port Burwell is located on the shore of lake Erie, a bit more than one hour south west of Toronto. There are also two American submarine museums on the shore of Lake Erie. USS Croaker in Buffalo, NY et USS Cod in Cleveland, Ohio. Why not go around Lake Erie to visit all 3 submarine museums.

It is worthwhile to visit both ONONDAGA at Rimouski, Quebec and OJIBWA at Port Burwell, Ontario. Although they are both Oberon class submarines, they are different in many ways.

Submarine Museum HMCS ONONDAGA, Rimouski, Québec: http://www.shmp.qc.ca/

Submarine Museum HMCS OJIBWA, Port Burwell, Ontario: http://www.projectojibwa.ca/

Submarine Museum USS Croaker, Buffalo, New York: http://www.ussvibuffalo.org/uss_croaker.html

Submarine Museum USS Cod, Cleveland, Ohio: http://www.usscod.org/

Enjoy your submarine visit !!!

Donald Courcy
Historian and Webmaster: http://radioalumni.ca/zz_ShipsMuseums.htm
 

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Sharla1

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#33
This was on Daily Planet on March 7 on the move of the Ojibwa sub.

Video has been removed.
 
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scotto

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#34
This was on Daily Planet on March 7 on the move of the Ojibwa sub.


If you click March on this link then click March 7 one can watch the moving of the sub.

http://watch.discoverychannel.ca/daily-planet/#clip1072920
It is in part two of the show, I just let part one finish off and then it leads into the next section with the sub. There is a map showing the trip from the east coast, up the St. Lawrence and then to the Welland Canal, must of missed the Hamilton stop.

Off topic but there is also a good show on the Great Lakes.
http://watch.discoverychannel.ca/discovery-presents/drain-the-great-lakes/#clip595725
 

scotto

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#35
Mahoney: Voyage to the inside of the HMCS Ojibwa

Hamilton Spectator
By Jeff Mahoney

On the drive to Port Burwell, George Roach (his licence plates say O-BOATS) tells me about his life aboard an Oberon-class submarine from 1968 to 1972, before he became a Hamilton police officer.

Such adventure. Steering a sleek, black, 90-metre-long vessel (yellow only in Beatle songs) through the ocean depths; firing torpedoes (blanks, for practice); playing cat-and-mouse with surface ships; trying to elude detection; talking on microphones; working the periscope.

The mystique of submarines. What was that TV show? I ask.

"Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea?" George offers.

That was it. The echoey sonar pulses and, of course, the dive alarm or klaxon.

George imitates it perfectly (he heard it so often, in real life).

"Ka-hooga. Ka-hooga," he goes. We laugh.

We're going to Port Burwell to see HMCS Ojibwa, now on permanent display and open for tours, many of which George gives (he retired as a cop in the late '90s).

The Ojibwa is sister ship to the Okanagan, which he "drove."

(You sail a ship but drive a submarine.)

You might remember Ojibwa stopped in Hamilton in 2012 on its way from Halifax (decommissioned there in 1998) via floating dry dock to Port Burwell, where it has taken up life as a museum.

Inside the Ojibwa, the reality behind the adventure sinks (no pun intended) in. As enormous and elongated as this craft is, the width inside measures a cramped 4.3 metres (much of the eight-metre beam is ballast tank).

The crew's bunk space, shelled out of the arched walls, seems uncomfortably narrow, like sleeping inside a canoe.
Full story;

http://www.thespec.com/news-story/4876331-mahoney-voyage-to-the-inside-of-the-hmcs-ojibwa/
 

scotto

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#36
Cold War-era sub at centre of controversy in tiny Ontario town

Default of $6-million loan to bring HMCS Ojibwa to Port Burwell has sent shockwaves through Elgin County.


By: Betsy Powell City Hall Bureau, Published on Fri Apr 03 2015
Toronto Star

Melissa Raven, director of communications with Project Ojibwa, gives a guided tour of the submarine on Good Friday.

PORT BURWELL, ONT.—In the unlikeliest of tiny Ontario towns looms a giant Cold War ghost

After the Second World War, there was much debate about whether Canada still needed submarines, until the Cuban Missile Crisis settled the question for the government of the day.

Today, one of Canada’s Cold War-era subs is at the centre of a different debate raging in the southwestern Ontario municipality of Bayham.
The controversy centres on the HMCS Ojibwa, a five-storey, football-field-long vessel that became a tourist attraction in the little hamlet of Port Burwell.


Last month, the Royal Bank of Canada called on the municipality to pay the $6-million loan used to cover the cost of hauling the 52-year-old Ojibwa from Halifax to the north shore of Lake Erie in 2012.


The defaulted loan sent shockwaves through quiet Elgin County.


“We sold the farm and bought a sub,” area resident Mary Fisher, who recently moved into the area, told the St. Thomas/Elgin Weekly News at an information session packed with 300 “grumbling townsfolk.”


“My grandchildren are going to be paying for this, if they’re still in Bayham.”

A blogger named John uses wry humour to convey his dismay over the sub situation, calling it a “monstrosity of a project.”

“There are so many things wrong with all this. . . . Why is it Bayham gets stuck with paying the bill?”

“We will still find a way to pay them back,” responds Melissa Raven, director of communications for the Elgin Military Museum (which brought the sub to Port Burwell), after taking a small group on an hour-long tour of the Ojibwa on Good Friday. She doesn’t want to get into specifics about a rescue plan. “We’re open to all kinds of ideas, all kinds of concepts, all kinds of partnerships.”

She’s well aware of critics like blogger John.

“We brought a submarine into a small community. There’s no guarantee everybody’s going to like it,” she says unapologetically.

Sitting in a small trailer near the Ojibwa, where a handful of sightseers bought admission tickets to see the vessel on this chilly, foggy holiday, Raven spoke to the Star about the submarine saga, in which she and her siblings are central figures.

“A lot of what we need to do is to let people know we’re here, to get more people coming,” says Raven, who has a background in marketing.

“We’re very determined. It’s a bunch (of people that) if you put a roadblock in front of us we’ll find a way around that, and if it leads to a mountain we’ll climb the mountain, and if that slips us down into an ocean, we’ll figure out a way to swim across it.”

That Raven, 64, is passionate about the Ojibwa is never in doubt. She impresses her small tour group with an encyclopedic knowledge of the vessel and marine history, which she credits to the many submariners who have come this way since the Ojibwa came to town.

Raven thinks municipal leaders over-estimated how many tourists would initially visit the vessel. The business plan suggested 100,000 visitors per season and so far, after a season-and-a-half, about 40,000 people have taken the tour.

“Because we’re really strapped for cash, we don’t have a marketing budget — not to sell us, but to let people know that we’re here. That’s been a challenge throughout,” she says.

“It’s a building process. People, I think, looked at the end of our five- to 10-year plan and thought that was what it would be like in year one, but every business needs to build. So we really only had one-and-a-part season before the plug got pulled on us.”

Raven is still hopeful the federal government may step in.

The Ojibwa’s sister boat, the HMCS Onondaga, is in Rimouski, Que., and does quite well as a tourist attraction. “We’re kind of saying, ‘How come there isn’t federal support for the Ojibwa?’ ” she says.

“We’re doing everything we can to keep it open and we worked so hard to get her here.”

How and why did the sub end up parked here?

The Raven siblings’ father, a war veteran, was one of the founders of the Elgin Military Museum, based in nearby St. Thomas. Its mandate is to tell the story of Elgin County and its residents and their role in the Canadian military.

In the Second World War, Elgin had a tank supply regiment. In 2009, the museum approached the Department of National Defence to see if it could get a tank to put on the lawn. DND didn’t have any tanks, “but there was a submarine heading to the scrap yard. It was in Halifax,” Raven says.

The bank advanced the money to the Elgin Military Museum after municipal leaders signed on as guarantor.

The original cost estimates were “vastly exceeded when the final invoices arrived,” Raven wrote in a March 13 statement. It included a litany of things gone wrong, including bad weather, federal funding that did not materialize, and a lack of ticket buyers.

Canadians have never acknowledged the importance of the submarine service in this country, she says.

“Those are the stories we need to tell because it looks now like we’re going into another Cold War. We need to know how we won the first one, how we prevented World War Three and our submarine service had a tremendous amount to do that.”
http://license.icopyright.net/3.7212-48523


More info;
http://www.bayham.on.ca/siteengine/activepage.asp

http://www.elgintourist.com/Tourism/Ojibwa-Submarine

http://projectojibwa.ca/
 

Sharla1

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#37
You would never see this happen due to the safety and if they could no one could afford the insurance. But too bad they couldn't take under water tours. That would be so cool to see the wildlife and especially the sunken stuff.
 

scotto

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#38
You would never see this happen due to the safety and if they could no one could afford the insurance. But too bad they couldn't take under water tours. That would be so cool to see the wildlife and especially the sunken stuff.
Maybe some place nice and warm, with no ice, but the insurance would be even more money.
 

scotto

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#39
I stopped by the marine museum at Port Burwell to have a look at the Ojibwa in it's new home. I was shown around by one of the staff who do the tours, his name was Len and he was quite knowledgeable for just starting in the tour business. I took a few from the outside but the only place that pictures were allowed inside, was the torpedo room. The rest of vessel was off-limits to any picture taking, a bit disappointing.
A few from the outside;








 

scotto

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#40
The torpedo room;







On the front of each torpedo tube hatch, there was this pin attached. Our guide explained that even though there is a glass covered hole to look through, a mistake on one sub cause it to sink because the personnel on duty thought the tube was empty. The tubes were updated with this pin which can be inserted through a small hole to see if there is any water present. They would check to see if the pin was wet.


This is a torpedo with no end section, Len our guide stated that back in the day during the cold war, these torpedoes were worth 1.3 million dollars.



This picture shows the end section of the torpedo that was fabricated by student of Paris District High School, very nicely done.


Lastly, this outside shot of the garbage chute, I wasn't permitted to take a picture of the inside part of it. Garbage would be weighed down so it would not float and give their position away.



A few pictures I wasn't allowed to take;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oberon-class_submarine

http://www.hazegray.org/navhist/rn/submarine/oberon/

http://jproc.ca/rrp/rrp2/oberon.html

Also;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EaZeZ5vxxI0
 
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