Oldest House

scotto

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#21
Scott,I thought that I either read somewhere, or Fred told me, that the current lighthouse keeper’s dwelling had been moved to a new location, or turned slightly. Something about the construction of the lift bridge? Given that the house is made of brick, was the brick all removed and then replaced?
Why would the brick have to be removed? Many beach houses were moved over the years, some where moved from as far away as Van Wagners' Beach to the Beach Strip.
I have been told that the Lighthouse Keeper's house was moved from the west side to the east side of the blvd.
All the pictures I have seen, the Keeper's house is located where it is now.

Picture sent in by member Drogo;
 

David O'Reilly

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#22
I said in my last post, that I thought the lighthouse keeper’s house was moved due to the construction of the lift bridge. This is wrong. Fred has told me that it had to be moved for the operation of the 1896 road swing bridge. Both the house and the turntable for the road swing bridge, were located on the south side of the canal. And when opened, would swing to the east right where the keeper’s house was situated. Hence, the need for the relocation of the house.
 

David O'Reilly

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#23
scotto
11-06-2013, 10:13 PM
Scott,I thought that I either read somewhere, or Fred told me, that the current lighthouse keeper’s dwelling had been moved to a new location, or turned slightly. Something about the construction of the lift bridge? Given that the house is made of brick, was the brick all removed and then replaced?

Why would the brick have to be removed? Many beach houses were moved over the years, some where moved from as far away as Van Wagners' Beach to the Beach Strip.
I have been told that the Lighthouse Keeper's house was moved from the west side to the east side of the blvd.
All the pictures I have seen, the Keeper's house is located where it is now.

Picture sent in by member Drogo;
http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/...Lighthouse/Lightkeepershouse1_zpsd2ea0465.jpg (http://s833.photobucket.com/user/sc...house/Lightkeepershouse1_zpsd2ea0465.jpg.html)
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Scott, when a brick building is constructed, the first layer of brick is layed on a concrete or stone foundation. ‘concrete’ is used to bind the bricks together. And to bind the first layer of bricks to the foundation. So the brick lighthouse keeper’s house couldn’t have been lifted off of the foundation. And even if it could have been, the brick walls would have dropped away.

So the brick must have been removed, and then replaced once the dwelling was turned.

The dwelling was turned for the construction of the road/radial swing bridge. The radial line (Hamilton Radial Electric Railroad) (HRER) began running in 1896. So I’m sure that there would have been something written about the moving of the lightkeeper’s house in a news paper from that year.

As for your comment that there were lots of houses on the beach that were moved, you also state that the lighthouse keeper’s house was the only brick house on the beach. Meaning that all of the rest were frame buildings. Lifting a frame house off of a foundation, presents no problems at all.
 

David O'Reilly

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#24
scotto
11-06-2013, 10:06 PM
Sharla
“Yea it was sad to see the old Dynes go.”

Does anyone know what happened to John Dynes’ house? Did it burn down with the first tavern?
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I didn't know that John Dynes had a house, the building that was demolished had plenty of room for the owner and guest if needed.
Gord Foster who was the for owner for many years, lived upstairs of the tavern with his family. The last owner used the upper floor as his office and rented out rooms to his employees and customers.
One of the old waiters told me that one of the Dynes men would drink there on a regular basis, when finished for the night, the waiter was under strict orders to help him home, which was close by.
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scotto
07-07-2013, 12:51 PM
From the book, "The Sand Strip" by Dorothy Turcotte.


As the years went by, a number of hotels sprang up along the Beach. The best known, and still the oldest operating tavern in Ontario is Dynes, established in 1846.
http://hamiltonbeachcommunity.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-2165.html

but it seems that John Dynes moved to the beach from Dundas some time before that.

…John Dynes… “was born in 1816 in Dundas and had located on the Beach in 1834.”
http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/documents/Brookes/default.asp?ID=Y1899#p16.99.40

so I wonder if the house that John Dynes built in 1834, was the same building that later became the tavern.
 

David O'Reilly

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#25
scotto
01-09-2010, 03:48 PM
From Dorothy Turcotte's book "The Sand Strip"

When the Hamilton and Northwestern Railway laid its line across the Beach in 1875, a new era began on the sand strip. Until then, anyone wishing to reach the Beach from Hamilton or Toronto had to come by boat or dirt road, or else take the train to the Great Western Railway station at Burlington.
Now, access to the Beach was easy.
Lots were laid out in 1875, and were auctioned off, then subleased to the purchaser. Wealthy Hamiltonians were quick to recognize the opportunity. Before long, spacious Victorian summer homes began to appear south of the Canal.
The first summer cottage is believed to have been built by a Mr. A. Turner, possibly Alexander Turner of James Turner and Company, one of the largest wholesale grocers in the country. Then Col. Villiers built a thatched house known as "The Bungalow". The building boom was on!

As Fred wrote, the Lighthouse Keeper's cottage would outdate any of these homes.


Scott, Fred has told me, and maybe even posted on the forom, that fisherman were given permits to build houses on the lake side of the beach. So when lots were laid out and sold, were the fisherman forced to either buy the land they occupied, or, get off the beach? ________________________________________
 

scotto

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#26
scotto
01-09-2010, 03:48 PM
From Dorothy Turcotte's book "The Sand Strip"


Scott, Fred has told me, and maybe even posted on the forom, that fisherman were given permits to build houses on the lake side of the beach. So when lots were laid out and sold, were the fisherman forced to either buy the land they occupied, or, get off the beach? ________________________________________
Might want to check with Peggy on that one, I believe ancestors who were fishermen didn't buy much land as they were squatters. The original Corey must of owned the land as his name is listed on one of the old maps.
 

David O'Reilly

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#27
scotto
01-09-2010, 03:48 PM
“From Dorothy Turcotte's book "The Sand Strip"


Scott, Fred has told me, and maybe even posted on the forom, that fisherman were given permits to build houses on the lake side of the beach. So when lots were laid out and sold, were the fisherman forced to either buy the land they occupied, or, get off the beach? ________________________________________

Might want to check with Peggy on that one, I believe ancestors who were fishermen didn't buy much land as they were squatters. The original Corey must of owned the land as his name is listed on one of the old maps.”

Hi Scott, I’m sure that you are correct. Fred probably told me that the fishermen obtained permits to fishfrom the beach, not build houses on the beach.

This thread indicates that there were houses on the beach before lots were laid out.

“Development of Hamilton Beach Has Been Rapid
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scotto
12-08-2013, 06:31 PM
“Development of Hamilton Beach Has Been Rapid
Hamilton Spectator 1915
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Veteran Resident Tells of Early Days

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Hotels Were Common Thing On Sandstrip


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Great Season Expected This Coming Year

Today the summer season at Burlington beach comes to a close, and from now until the end of this month business men, who with their families have enjoyed the breeze of the lake during the hot weather, prepare to leave for their winter homes. Never in the history of the resort has there been such a demand for houses for the summer months, and old sages predict that next year the demand will be even greater. The growth of the beach proper, from about the power house to the Beach road, during the last fifteen years has been remarkable. Probably no one on the sand-strip has witnessed this growth better than Robert Fletcher, who resides at station 4 the year round, and who eighty-four years first saw the light of day in a house about two hundred feet from where the canal now is. Mr. Fletcher was the only son of Erin and Mrs. Fletcher, and was born about two years after they immigrated to this country from England.
He has resided on the sand-strip all of his life, and despite his ripe old age, enjoys good health and has the use of all his faculties.

IN THE EARLY DAYS
When Mr. Fletcher was a boy, the beach was one vast stretch of waste land, with only a house dotted here and there. In a disastrous fire, his father lost his home near the canal, and, in building a new house, selected a site between station 4 and the Beach road. Mr. Fletcher lives in the house just opposite the homestead.

http://hamiltonbeachcommunity.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-2240.html

so the first question is, did these peaple own the land that their houses ” were on? And if not, were they forced to buy the land when the lots were laid out?



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Drogo

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#28
You mentioned an old Cory house before but I still don't know where exactly (I think you said new the old Skyway Canvas) but not sure. I would dearly love to see a picture. I put a picture on the picture gallery last night. Anything appreciated.
 

scotto

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#29
You mentioned an old Cory house before but I still don't know where exactly (I think you said new the old Skyway Canvas) but not sure. I would dearly love to see a picture. I put a picture on the picture gallery last night. Anything appreciated.
I remember bringing this question up with Fred many years ago and his response was "which one?". The main Corey house that I know of is the one in the 700's near the old variety store (now Harry's) named Sumerest, but as you know the Corey's one of the original settlers of the Beach and had many houses. You sent a picture many years of a cottage that you stated belonged to the Corey's, it was more of a painting than a photo and I don't recall the location.
 

David O'Reilly

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#30
scotto
11-06-2013, 05:15 PM
“This thread indicates that the lighthouse keeper’s house ‘was’ built of brick.
http://hamiltonbeachcommunity.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-637.html

it’s made of brick now. Was it always a brick house? And, were there other brick houses built on the beach in the 19th century? And I seem to remember reading on the ‘Beach Lighthouse’ page (which I always have trouble finding) that the ferryman had a house on the beach. I wonder if it had been made of brick. I believe the ferry began running in about 1855.

I don't recall any other houses near the canal being built from brick and of all the grand summer homes that I remember on the beach, none were brick.
From the book "The Sand Strip"
"On July 18th, 1856, sparks from the steamer Ranger set fire to the pier. Before the day was over, the lighthouse and both the ferryman's and the lighthouse keeper's homes had been destroyed. The brick house built for the lighthouse keeper as a replacement is still standing by the Canal."


Just to add, the lighthouse keeper's house had/has brick parapet-end walls which were considered the historical part of the structure, I have attached a picture from the late 1800's that shows the top section of the walls. The chimney's (there are two) and the top covering of brick have been re-worked over the years.



Scott have you ever come across any pictures of the original light house?
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I was wondering if anyone knew what is the oldest still standing house on the beach?
 

scotto

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#31
scotto
11-06-2013, 05:15 PM


Scott have you ever come across any pictures of the original light house?
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In Ray Mifflin's book Harbour Lights, there are a few photos (including the book cover) of the old lighthouses. There seems to be two different ones shown. Both were located at the end of the south east pier while the newest one from 1858 was/is located on land near the lift bridge.
 

David O'Reilly

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#32
scotto
11-06-2013, 05:15 PM

“I don't recall any other houses near the canal being built from brick and of all the grand summer homes that I remember on the beach, none were brick.
From the book "The Sand Strip"
"On July 18th, 1856, sparks from the steamer Ranger set fire to the pier. Before the day was over, the lighthouse and both the ferryman's and the lighthouse keeper's homes had been destroyed. The brick house built for the lighthouse keeper as a replacement is still standing by the Canal."


Just to add, the lighthouse keeper's house had/has brick parapet-end walls which were considered the historical part of the structure, I have attached a picture from the late 1800's that shows the top section of the walls. The chimney's (there are two) and the top covering of brick have been re-worked over the years.

http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/...h Pics/Old Beach Pics/burl230_zps53db5f84.jpg (http://s833.photobucket.com/user/sc...s/Old Beach Pics/burl230_zps53db5f84.jpg.html)

Scott how long was it before the stone lighthouse was constructed and put in to use? And what was done in the mean time? Was there a temporary structure constructed?
________________________________________


I was wondering if anyone knew what is the oldest still standing house on the beach?
 

scotto

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#33
scotto
11-06-2013, 05:15 PM


Scott how long was it before the stone lighthouse was constructed and put in to use? And what was done in the mean time? Was there a temporary structure constructed?
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From Dorothy Turcotte's book;
In 1838, a lighthouse was built on the south side of the canal, and a lighthouse keeper was hired. He and the ferryman worked together, and each had a house by the canal. George Thompson was hired as lighthouse keeper in April of 1845, and he remained in the post until March of 1875. During that period, he kept a diary which provides us with some of the most important information and insight into the Canal and its surroundings at that time.
Piers, lighthouse and houses at first were all made of wood. On July 18th, 1856, sparks from the steamer Ranger set fire to the pier. Before the day was over, the lighthouse and both the ferryman's and the lighthouse keeper's homes had been destroyed. The brick house built for the lighthouse keeper as a replacement is still standing by the Canal, and is still occupied by the lighthouse keeper. At the close of the 1987 shipping season, the Canadian Coast Guard's present lighthouse keeper will become "surplus to departmental requirements", and an era will end. The house is on Hamilton LACAC's inventory of heritage buildings that should be preserved.
In September of 1856, a lighthouse was built at the end of the southeast pier.
Two years later, work began on a beautiful stone lighthouse on the south bank of the Canal. Built by John Brown who had constructed the six famous Imperial Towers on Lake Huron and Georgian Bay, the Burlington Canal lighthouse is the twin of the one on Christian Island. It is 55 feet high, and is constructed of white dolomite limestone.
This fine lighthouse still stands. Now looking rather grimy, and dwarfed by the Skyway, its brilliant white stone made it the chief landmark on the Beach for many years. It, too, is considered to be an important heritage building.
Lighthouse keepers have proudly taken hundreds of visitors to the top of this structure to marvel at the view. George Thompson often wrote of taking parties of tourists to the top of the lighthouse. Even in the 1940's, "going up in the lighthouse" was a great treat.
The old, burned pier and lighthouse were demolished in 1860.
 

scotto

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#34
Some time back I was looking at this picture in another thread and noticed that the radial line was running beside the Lighthouse Keeper's house instead of in front as would be expected. I concluded that the house had not been moved to it's present day location yet.
The history books have stated that the house was moved to make way for the new Radial Bridge.
This picture is from Collections Canada and dated somewhere between 1877 to 1878.


This is a close up of wires beside the house and clearly shows the radial line power lines.


In this photo, the same person with the same dog from the first picture is standing on the Radial Bridge and though somewhat hard to make out, the Keeper's house is just to the right of the bridge approach. I have marked the parapet wall and the reason to mention the person on the bridge is that it is my guess that these pictures were taken on the same day. It almost seems that the Radial Bridge is built to go around the Keeper's house.



In this photo from a post card, the Keeper's house is now in it's present day location and a hydro tower has taken it's spot beside the yacht club.

 
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