Plan 2014 (High Lake Levels)

Opie

Registered User
Mar 1, 2017
267
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The Beach Strip
Friday July 19th, the average level is at 75.85 M (248.85 Feet)

Per Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Since 2008, the July lake level average has been 75.12 M
The average lake level for July 2017 was 75.69 M
Surface water temperature by the lift bridge is 17C / 62.6 F

Next reading date is: Friday July 26th, 2019

Reading date / Lake Average 2019
July 11- 75.89
July 05 – 75.93
June 28 – 75.95
June 21 – 75.95
June 14 – 75.984
June 07 – 75.97
May 30 – 75.94
May 24 – 75.86
May 17 – 75.795
May 03 – 75.51
Apr 29 – 75.41
Apr 12 – 75.10
Mar 29 – 75.018
Mar 15 – 75.0
Mar 08 – 74.97
Feb 22 – 75.00
Feb 08 – 74.96
Jan 25 – 74.88
Jan 11 – 74.81
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2018
Dec 28 – 74.78
Dec 14 – 74.72
Nov 30 – 74.696
Nov 16 – 74.68
Nov 02 – 74.67
Oct 19 – 74.614
Oct 05 – 74.72
Sept 21 – 74.785
Sept 07 – 74.86
Aug 24 – 74.91
Aug 10 – 74.98
Jul 30 – 75.12
Jul 13 – 75.129
Jun 29 – 75.228
Jun 15 – 75.25
Jun 01 – 75.33
May 18 – 75.35
May 04 – 75.23
Apr 20 – 75.08
Apr 06 – 74.97
Mar 23 – 74.918
Mar 09 – 74.99
Feb 23 – 74.973
Feb 09 – 74.90
Jan 26 – 74.95
Jan 12 – 74.81 M
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2017
Dec 27 – 74.71 M
Dec 08 – 74.795
Nov 24 – 74.89
Nov 09 – 74.929
Oct 27 – 74.83
Oct 10 – 74.95
Sept 29 – 74.99
Sept 15 – 75.12
Sept 01 – 75.28
Aug 18 - 75.47
Aug 04 - 75.6
July 22 - 75.71
 
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Opie

Registered User
Mar 1, 2017
267
82
28
The Beach Strip
Friday July 26th, the average level is at 75.78 M (248.62 Feet)

Per Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Since 2008, the July lake level average has been 75.12 M
The average lake level for July 2017 was 75.69 M
Surface water temperature by the lift bridge is 20C / 68 F

Next reading date is: Friday August 2nd, 2019

Reading date / Lake Average 2019
July 19 - 75.85
July 11 - 75.89
July 05 - 75.93
June 28 - 75.95
June 21 - 75.95
June 14 – 75.984
June 07 – 75.97
May 30 - 75.94
May 24 - 75.86
May 17 - 75.795
May 03 - 75.51
Apr 29 - 75.41
Apr 12 - 75.10
Mar 29 - 75.018
Mar 15 - 75.0
Mar 08 - 74.97
Feb 22 - 75.00
Feb 08 - 74.96
Jan 25 - 74.88
Jan 11 - 74.81
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2018
Dec 28 – 74.78
Dec 14 – 74.72
Nov 30 – 74.696
Nov 16 – 74.68
Nov 02 – 74.67
Oct 19 – 74.614
Oct 05 – 74.72
Sept 21 – 74.785
Sept 07 – 74.86
Aug 24 – 74.91
Aug 10 – 74.98
Jul 30 – 75.12
Jul 13 – 75.129
Jun 29 – 75.228
Jun 15 – 75.25
Jun 01 – 75.33
May 18 – 75.35
May 04 – 75.23
Apr 20 – 75.08
Apr 06 – 74.97
Mar 23 – 74.918
Mar 09 – 74.99
Feb 23 – 74.973
Feb 09 – 74.90
Jan 26 – 74.95
Jan 12 – 74.81 M
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2017
Dec 27 – 74.71 M
Dec 08 – 74.795
Nov 24 – 74.89
Nov 09 – 74.929
Oct 27 – 74.83
Oct 10 – 74.95
Sept 29 – 74.99
Sept 15 – 75.12
Sept 01 – 75.28
Aug 18 - 75.47
Aug 04 - 75.6
July 22 - 75.71
 

scotto

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 15, 2004
6,639
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The Beach Strip
Friday July 26th, the average level is at 75.78 M (248.62 Feet)
We had a bit of a drop in the lake level about two weeks ago and it seemed to of stalled after that. Checking the level with the canal level meter and we are now about four inches below the second step on the ladder.
July26.JPG
 
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scotto

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 15, 2004
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The Beach Strip
https://www.grca.on.ca/2019/07/29/grca-issues-flood-warning-update-for-lake-ontario-shoreline/


GRCA Issues Flood Warning Update for Lake Ontario Shoreline
July 29, 2019





Flood Potential: High

The Ganaraska Region Conservation Authority advises that water levels on Lake Ontario reached a new record peak of 75.92 meters above sea level (masl), which was last recorded on June 15th. Since then water levels have slowly declined and are now sitting at 75.73 masl as measured at Cobourg today. With outflows set at 10,400 m3/s since June 13th, which is above the maximum limit of Plan 2014 and dry weather in the forecast, the lake level will continue its slow decline over the coming weeks. The actual rate of decline is dependent on the amount of precipitation received in the basin.
Lake Erie continues to provide record inflows (via the Niagara River) for this time of year and with all the Great Lakes experiencing high water levels it is expected that Lake Ontario will continue to see above average water levels for the time of year even as they decline. The International Lake Ontario – St. Lawrence River Board (ILOSLRB) predicts the water level will decline by 5 to 8 cm per week and reach a level of 75.5 masl in late August with normal amounts of rainfall.
The main concern during high lake levels is shoreline erosion and flooding of low-lying shorelines including dynamic beaches and wetlands along the shore. Shortened beaches, waterfront trails and shoreline protections may be damaged by wave action especially during strong onshore winds.
While this Flood Warning is in effect, shorelines may be slippery with unstable banks and bluffs may be actively eroding. Residents are asked to exercise caution around our shorelines and to alert any children in their care of these dangers.
This Flood Warning for the Lake Ontario shoreline was first issued on May 13th and will remain in effect through at least August 22nd, 2019. Conservation Authority staff will continue to monitor conditions, and provide updates as necessary. Should you have any questions or wish to report flooding, please contact the following GRCA staff at 905-885-8173.
Mike Smith
Flood Operations Officer
 

scotto

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 15, 2004
6,639
139
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The Beach Strip
"PLAN 2014 allows for Lake Ontario to have more than a metre (greater than 3.3 feet of increase) more water in it, than the previous plan."
Thanks for the info, the level seems to be edging ever so slowly down, so hopefully next year more water is released earlier.
This picture from today showing the launch at Fisherman's Pier, compared to my picture of the truck at the ramp, the level has gone down but not much.
Ramp.JPG


For this month we have just past the 75.8 mark, hardly a difference.
 
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Opie

Registered User
Mar 1, 2017
267
82
28
The Beach Strip
Good morning

Friday August 2nd, the average level is at 75.72 M (248.43 Feet)

Per Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Since 2009, the August lake level average has been 74.98 M
The average lake level for August 2017 was 75.43 M
Surface water temperature by the lift bridge is 18C / 65 F

Next reading date is: Friday August 9th, 2019

Reading date / Lake Average 2019
July 26 – 75.78
July 19 - 75.85
July 11 - 75.89
July 05 - 75.93
June 28 - 75.95
June 21 - 75.95
June 14 – 75.984
June 07 – 75.97
May 30 - 75.94
May 24 - 75.86
May 17 - 75.795
May 03 - 75.51
Apr 29 - 75.41
Apr 12 - 75.10
Mar 29 - 75.018
Mar 15 - 75.0
Mar 08 - 74.97
Feb 22 - 75.00
Feb 08 - 74.96
Jan 25 - 74.88
Jan 11 - 74.81
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2018
Dec 28 – 74.78
Dec 14 – 74.72
Nov 30 – 74.696
Nov 16 – 74.68
Nov 02 – 74.67
Oct 19 – 74.614
Oct 05 – 74.72
Sept 21 – 74.785
Sept 07 – 74.86
Aug 24 – 74.91
Aug 10 – 74.98
Jul 30 – 75.12
Jul 13 – 75.129
Jun 29 – 75.228
Jun 15 – 75.25
Jun 01 – 75.33
May 18 – 75.35
May 04 – 75.23
Apr 20 – 75.08
Apr 06 – 74.97
Mar 23 – 74.918
Mar 09 – 74.99
Feb 23 – 74.973
Feb 09 – 74.90
Jan 26 – 74.95
Jan 12 – 74.81 M
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2017
Dec 27 – 74.71 M
Dec 08 – 74.795
Nov 24 – 74.89
Nov 09 – 74.929
Oct 27 – 74.83
Oct 10 – 74.95
Sept 29 – 74.99
Sept 15 – 75.12
Sept 01 – 75.28
Aug 18 - 75.47
Aug 04 - 75.6
July 22 - 75.71

And courtesy of the IJC,, their numbers


International Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River Board
Conseil international du lac Ontario et du fleuve Saint-Laurent
The average Lake Ontario outflow is expected to be 10400 m³/s for the start of the coming week. Actual outflows will depend on conditions in the St. Lawrence River.

Week Ending: Average this time
Wed, 31 Jul 2019 of the year (c)

Lake Ontario / Lac Ontario
Actual end of week level: 75.70 (248.36) 74.96 (245.93)
Computed Plan 2014 Level (a): 75.75 (248.52)
Computed Preproject Level (b): 76.20 (250.00)
Weekly Mean Outflow: 10400 (367300) 7760 (274000)
Weekly Total Supply: 8450 (298400) 6970 (246100)
Lake St. Lawrence at Long Sault Dam 73.38 (240.75) 73.47 (241.04)
Weekly Mean Level:
Lake St. Louis at Pointe-Claire Weekly 21.86 (71.72) 21.25 (69.72)
Mean Level:
Montreal Harbour at Jetty #1 Weekly Mean 6.91 (22.67) 6.37 (20.90)
Ottawa River at Carillon Weekly Mean 1080 (38100) 1300 (45900)
Outflow:
Preliminary Lake Ontario Outflow for Week 10400 (367300) 7730 (273000)
Ending Fri, 09 Aug 2019:

Levels are in metres (feet) IGLD 1985. Supply and flows are in cubic metres (feet) per second m³/s (ft³/s).
(a) Levels that would have occurred with strict adherence to Plan 2014.
(b) Levels that would have occurred had there been no Lake Ontario regulation.
(c) For comparison purposes, Lake Ontario water level data since 1918 are used to be consistent with those published in the US and Canadian Great Lakes bulletins (http://www.waterlevels.gc.ca/C&A/bulletin-eng.html). Other averages are for the periods as follows: Lake Ontario outflows and levels at Long Sault and Pointe-Claire since 1960; Montreal since 1967; and Ottawa River outflow at Carillon since 1963.
The regulation plan for Lake Ontario specifies a weekly average outflow from Saturday through the following Friday, inclusive. To provide timely information for the coming week to the hydropower and Seaway operators, and our readers, we complete the regulation plan calculations each Thursday. Our calculations use the data available at the time, which are from the previous seven days (Thursday through Wednesday). Since the two time periods do not exactly coincide, their data are usually slightly different.
The table shows the actual flow for the week ending Wednesday. It also gives the preliminary flow for the coming week ending Friday. We emphasize that this is the preliminary flow, since unforeseen flow changes may occur after we have issued our notice. When these flow changes occur, they are reflected in the subsequent week's notice.
Information in this report is compiled from provisional data provided by: Environment & Climate Change Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Hydro Quebec, Ontario Power Generation Inc, the New York Power Authority, and the U.S. National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration.
Visit the Board's website at https://ijc.org/en/loslrb to find out more.
 
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Opie

Registered User
Mar 1, 2017
267
82
28
The Beach Strip
Good morning

Friday August 9th, the average level is at 75.65 M (248.19 Feet)

Per Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Since 2009, the August lake level average has been 74.98 M
The average lake level for August 2017 was 75.43 M
Surface water temperature by the lift bridge is 20 C / 68 F

Next reading date is: Friday August 16th, 2019

Reading date / Lake Average 2019
Aug 02 – 75.72
July 26 – 75.78
July 19 - 75.85
July 11 - 75.89
July 05 - 75.93
June 28 - 75.95
June 21 - 75.95
June 14 – 75.984
June 07 – 75.97
May 30 - 75.94
May 24 - 75.86
May 17 - 75.795
May 03 - 75.51
Apr 29 - 75.41
Apr 12 - 75.10
Mar 29 - 75.018
Mar 15 - 75.0
Mar 08 - 74.97
Feb 22 - 75.00
Feb 08 - 74.96
Jan 25 - 74.88
Jan 11 - 74.81
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2018
Dec 28 – 74.78
Dec 14 – 74.72
Nov 30 – 74.696
Nov 16 – 74.68
Nov 02 – 74.67
Oct 19 – 74.614
Oct 05 – 74.72
Sept 21 – 74.785
Sept 07 – 74.86
Aug 24 – 74.91
Aug 10 – 74.98
Jul 30 – 75.12
Jul 13 – 75.129
Jun 29 – 75.228
Jun 15 – 75.25
Jun 01 – 75.33
May 18 – 75.35
May 04 – 75.23
Apr 20 – 75.08
Apr 06 – 74.97
Mar 23 – 74.918
Mar 09 – 74.99
Feb 23 – 74.973
Feb 09 – 74.90
Jan 26 – 74.95
Jan 12 – 74.81 M
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2017
Dec 27 – 74.71 M
Dec 08 – 74.795
Nov 24 – 74.89
Nov 09 – 74.929
Oct 27 – 74.83
Oct 10 – 74.95
Sept 29 – 74.99
Sept 15 – 75.12
Sept 01 – 75.28
Aug 18 - 75.47
Aug 04 - 75.6
July 22 - 75.71

And courtesy of the IJC,, their numbers


International Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River Board
Conseil international du lac Ontario et du fleuve Saint-Laurent
The average Lake Ontario outflow is expected to be 10400 m³/s for the start of the coming week. Actual outflows will depend on conditions in the St. Lawrence River.
Week Ending: Average this time
Wed, 07 Aug 2019 of the year (c)

Lake Ontario
Actual end of week level: 75.63 (248.13) 74.93 (245.83)
Computed Plan 2014 Level (a): 75.68 (248.29)
Computed Preproject Level (b): 76.15 (249.84)
Weekly Mean Outflow: 10400 (367300) 7730 (273000)
Weekly Total Supply: 8090 (285700) 6780 (239400)
Lake St. Lawrence at Long Sault Dam 73.18 (240.09) 73.43 (240.91)
Weekly Mean Level:
Lake St. Louis at Pointe-Claire Weekly 21.81 (71.56) 21.23 (69.65)
Mean Level:
Montreal Harbour at Jetty #1 Weekly Mean 6.91 (22.67) 6.35 (20.83)
Level:
Ottawa River at Carillon Weekly Mean 880 (31100) 1240 (43800)
Outflow:
Preliminary Lake Ontario Outflow for Week 10400 (367300) 7710 (272300)
Ending Fri, 16 Aug 2019:
Levels are in metres (feet) IGLD 1985. Supply and flows are in cubic metres (feet) per second m³/s (ft³/s).
(a) Levels that would have occurred with strict adherence to Plan 2014.
(b) Levels that would have occurred had there been no Lake Ontario regulation.
(c) For comparison purposes, Lake Ontario water level data since 1918 are used to be consistent with those published in the US and Canadian Great Lakes bulletins (http://www.waterlevels.gc.ca/C&A/bulletin-eng.html). Other averages are for the periods as follows: Lake Ontario outflows and levels at Long Sault and Pointe-Claire since 1960; Montreal since 1967; and Ottawa River outflow at Carillon since 1963.
The regulation plan for Lake Ontario specifies a weekly average outflow from Saturday through the following Friday, inclusive. To provide timely information for the coming week to the hydropower and Seaway operators, and our readers, we complete the regulation plan calculations each Thursday. Our calculations use the data available at the time, which are from the previous seven days (Thursday through Wednesday). Since the two time periods do not exactly coincide, their data are usually slightly different.
The table shows the actual flow for the week ending Wednesday. It also gives the preliminary flow for the coming week ending Friday. We emphasize that this is the preliminary flow, since unforeseen flow changes may occur after we have issued our notice. When these flow changes occur, they are reflected in the subsequent week's notice.
Information in this report is compiled from provisional data provided by: Environment & Climate Change Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Hydro Quebec, Ontario Power Generation Inc, the New York Power Authority, and the U.S. National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration.
Ces renseignements sont fournis à l'aide des données préliminaires de: Environnement et Changement climatique Canada, Ministère des Pêches et Océans, Hydro Québec, Ontario Power Generation Inc, New York Power Authority et U.S. National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration.
Visit the Board's website at https://ijc.org/en/loslrb to find out more.
 
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Baxman

New member
Jun 18, 2019
3
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3
Repeal Plan 2014 started as just a Facebook group, but has evolved into an organized committee sporting a petition to repeal the IJC’s plan with roughly 20,000 signatures. The group held a protest to further their mission Saturday afternoon, drawing residents and business owners from the lakeshore and surrounding areas.
Read article;
https://spectrumlocalnews.com/nys/r...-targeting-i-j-c--plan-2014-draws-large-crowd
 
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scotto

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 15, 2004
6,639
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The Beach Strip
It does look like we have had some progress this month, looking at our canal meter the level has dropped about 14", we are now at the second step on the ladder.

From today;
Aug11.JPG


And checking the Tidal Observations, it shows we are down over .4 M from last month.
 
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scotto

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 15, 2004
6,639
139
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The Beach Strip
https://ijc.org/en/loslrb/lake-onta...y5dCWaRqknZG0ZWop1ERzHP2T2SO_bh0BE8j3G03-M7Wg





Lake Ontario Water Levels Decline More Rapidly

Date
August 09, 2019
Water levels on Lake Ontario have begun to decline more rapidly in recent days due to a combination of continued record-high outflows, declining inflows from Lake Erie and generally drier weather across the basin.
Lake Ontario’s level remains at record-highs for this time of year, but it has declined about 29 cm (11.4 in) since June 13th, when outflows were first increased to 10,400 cm3/s (367,270 cubic feet per second). This record-high outflow has now been sustained for a record duration, with August 07 marking the 56th consecutive day of flows at 10,400 m3/s (367,270 cfs), more than the 55 days that the same record-outflow was sustained during the summer of 2017, when it lasted from June 14th to August 7th.
However, Lake Erie’s level also remains at record-highs and its outflow, most of which passes through the Niagara River, continues to add water to Lake Ontario at a record-rate. Nonetheless, Lake Erie has also been declining recently, and this has allowed Lake Ontario’s rate of decline to increase slightly over the last several days. Lake Ontario has been dropping at a rate of about 1 cm (0.4 in) per day since August 2nd, and after some scattered rainfall the past day or so, drier weather is expected to return and continue through the end of the week allowing lake levels to continue to decline.
The Board is acutely aware and concerned for the welfare of the many affected shoreline property and business owners, as well as the shoreline environmental damage and other impacts of the continuing high water levels. The Boards’ current regulation strategy includes deviations from the prescribed flows of Plan 2014 with the specific intention of maximizing the rate of relief that lower water levels will provide to those affected.
Information on hydrologic conditions, water levels and outflows, including graphics and photos, are available on the Board’s website and posted to the Board’s Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/InternationalLakeOntarioStLawrenceRiverBoard (English), and more detailed information is available on its website at https://www.ijc.org/en/loslrb.
Contacts:
Rob Caldwell: (613) 938-5864; Rob.Caldwell@canada.ca
Andrew Kornacki: (716) 879-4349, (716) 352-8669; Andrew.A.Kornacki@usace.army.mil
The International Lake Ontario – St. Lawrence River Board specifies the outflows from Lake Ontario, according to Plan 2014 as required in the 2016 Supplementary Order from the International Joint Commission. This plan was agreed to by the United States and Canada in December 2016 in an effort to improve environmental performance while maintaining most of the benefits provided to other interests by the previous Plan 1958-D, which was in use since 1963. In determining outflows, the Board, in conjunction with its staff, pays close attention to water levels in the Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River system and on the Great Lakes upstream, and to the effects on stakeholders within the basin .
Water levels vary from year-to-year and throughout the year depending on weather and water supply conditions. Such variations benefit coastal wetlands and are critical to a healthy lake environment, but may at times and depending on individual circumstances increase the vulnerability of shoreline structures and reduce opportunities for recreational boating activities. The Board urges everyone to be prepared to live within the full range of levels that have occurred in the past and of those that may occur in the future. Based on historical observations and projected future conditions, at a minimum, Lake Ontario water levels are expected to range from a high of 75.92 m (249.1 ft.) to a low of 73.56 m (241.3 ft.) at infrequent intervals. However, it is also recognized that future climate conditions are uncertain, and more extreme water levels may be reached and these extremes may occur more often. Levels on the St. Lawrence River tend to vary more widely than on Lake Ontario. Also, these levels do not include the varying local effects of strong winds and wave action that significantly increase or decrease local water levels on both the lake and river, with temporary changes of over half a meter (two feet) possible in some locations.
For more information, please see the Board’s website (
ijc.org/loslrb) and Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/InternationalLakeOntarioStLawrenceRiverBoard).To receive a weekly email about water levels and flows in the Lake Ontario–St. Lawrence River system, please send a blank e-mail message to
stlaw-L-subscribe@cciw.ca with the word ’subscribe’ in the title and body of your message.
 

scotto

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 15, 2004
6,639
139
63
The Beach Strip
August 9, 2019

Dear Resident:

I'm pleased to advise that Hamilton City Council approved my motion to
implement the City's 'Compassionate Grant Program' to assist residents impacted
by high lake levels. Residents who've experienced basement flooding may be
eligible for a compassionate grant of up to $1,000.

You're encouraged to contact Sedgwick Canada toll free at
1-866-596-2242 and an adjuster will create a file for your address.

Please do not hesitate to contact me should you wish to discuss this matter
further.

Your Councillor,





------

Chad Collins,
Councillor, Ward 5
Centennial

City Hall, 71 Main Street West, Hamilton. Ontario L8P 4Y5

Tel. 905 546-2716 Fax. 905546-2535 E-mail: Chad.Collins@hamilton.ca
 

Opie

Registered User
Mar 1, 2017
267
82
28
The Beach Strip
Good morning

Friday August 16th, the average level is at 75.585 M (247.98 Feet)

Per Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Since 2009, the August lake level average has been 74.98 M
The average lake level for August 2017 was 75.43 M
Surface water temperature by the lift bridge is 17 C / 62.6 F

Next reading date is: Friday August 23rd, 2019

Reading date / Lake Average 2019
Aug 09 – 75.65
Aug 02 – 75.72
July 26 – 75.78
July 19 - 75.85
July 11 - 75.89
July 05 - 75.93
June 28 - 75.95
June 21 - 75.95
June 14 – 75.984
June 07 – 75.97
May 30 - 75.94
May 24 - 75.86
May 17 - 75.795
May 03 - 75.51
Apr 29 - 75.41
Apr 12 - 75.10
Mar 29 - 75.018
Mar 15 - 75.0
Mar 08 - 74.97
Feb 22 - 75.00
Feb 08 - 74.96
Jan 25 - 74.88
Jan 11 - 74.81
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2018
Dec 28 – 74.78
Dec 14 – 74.72
Nov 30 – 74.696
Nov 16 – 74.68
Nov 02 – 74.67
Oct 19 – 74.614
Oct 05 – 74.72
Sept 21 – 74.785
Sept 07 – 74.86
Aug 24 – 74.91
Aug 10 – 74.98
Jul 30 – 75.12
Jul 13 – 75.129
Jun 29 – 75.228
Jun 15 – 75.25
Jun 01 – 75.33
May 18 – 75.35
May 04 – 75.23
Apr 20 – 75.08
Apr 06 – 74.97
Mar 23 – 74.918
Mar 09 – 74.99
Feb 23 – 74.973
Feb 09 – 74.90
Jan 26 – 74.95
Jan 12 – 74.81 M
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2017
Dec 27 – 74.71 M
Dec 08 – 74.795
Nov 24 – 74.89
Nov 09 – 74.929
Oct 27 – 74.83
Oct 10 – 74.95
Sept 29 – 74.99
Sept 15 – 75.12
Sept 01 – 75.28
Aug 18 - 75.47
Aug 04 - 75.6
July 22 - 75.71

And courtesy of the IJC,, their numbers

International Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River Board
The average Lake Ontario outflow is expected to be 10400 m³/s for the start of the coming week. Actual outflows will depend on conditions in the St. Lawrence River.
Week Ending: Average this time
Wed, 14 Aug 2019 of the year (c)
Lake Ontario / Lac Ontario
Actual end of week level: 75.54 (247.83) 74.90 (245.73)
Computed Plan 2014 Level (a): 75.61 (248.06)
Computed Preproject Level (b): 76.14 (249.80)
Weekly Mean Outflow: 10400 (367300) 7710 (272300)
Weekly Total Supply: 7450 (263100) 6700 (236600)
Lake St. Lawrence at Long Sault Dam 73.10 (239.83) 73.39 (240.78)
Weekly Mean Level:
Lake St. Louis at Pointe-Claire Weekly 21.80 (71.52) 21.21 (69.59)
Mean Level:
Montreal Harbour at Jetty #1 Weekly Mean 6.85 (22.47) 6.33 (20.77)
Level:
Ottawa River at Carillon Weekly Mean 835 (29500) 1190 (42000)
Outflow:
Preliminary Lake Ontario Outflow for Week 10400 (367300) 7690 (271600)
Ending Fri, 23 Aug 2019:
Levels are in metres (feet) IGLD 1985. Supply and flows are in cubic metres (feet) per second m³/s (ft³/s).
(a) Levels that would have occurred with strict adherence to Plan 2014.
(b) Levels that would have occurred had there been no Lake Ontario regulation.
(c) For comparison purposes, Lake Ontario water level data since 1918 are used to be consistent with those published in the US and Canadian Great Lakes bulletins (http://www.waterlevels.gc.ca/C&A/bulletin-eng.html). Other averages are for the periods as follows: Lake Ontario outflows and levels at Long Sault and Pointe-Claire since 1960; Montreal since 1967; and Ottawa River outflow at Carillon since 1963.
The regulation plan for Lake Ontario specifies a weekly average outflow from Saturday through the following Friday, inclusive. To provide timely information for the coming week to the hydropower and Seaway operators, and our readers, we complete the regulation plan calculations each Thursday. Our calculations use the data available at the time, which are from the previous seven days (Thursday through Wednesday). Since the two time periods do not exactly coincide, their data are usually slightly different.
The table shows the actual flow for the week ending Wednesday. It also gives the preliminary flow for the coming week ending Friday. We emphasize that this is the preliminary flow, since unforeseen flow changes may occur after we have issued our notice. When these flow changes occur, they are reflected in the subsequent week's notice.
Information in this report is compiled from provisional data provided by: Environment & Climate Change Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Hydro Quebec, Ontario Power Generation Inc, the New York Power Authority, and the U.S. National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration.
Visit the Board's website at https://ijc.org/en/loslrb to find out more.
 
Last edited:
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Opie

Registered User
Mar 1, 2017
267
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28
The Beach Strip
With the current lake level still being over a half meter higher than normal-translates to flood stage. This past Wednesday the IJC decided to reduce the outflow from the Mosses Saunders dam. The amount of the reduction may seem small but 1 cm over the course of a week is still badly needed. We need to get the lake level down faster not slower as the summer/fall storm season approaches, which in past years has sent enormous waves crashing onto the shores. See below for the latest IJC news release

Friday August 23rd, the average level is at 75.51 M (247.736 Feet)

Per Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Since 2009, the August lake level average has been 74.98 M
The average lake level for August 2017 was 75.43 M
Surface water temperature by the lift bridge is 18 C / 65 F

Next reading date is: Friday September 6th, 2019

Reading date / Lake Average 2019
Aug 16 – 75.585
Aug 09 – 75.65
Aug 02 – 75.72
July 26 – 75.78
July 19 - 75.85
July 11 - 75.89
July 05 - 75.93
June 28 - 75.95
June 21 - 75.95
June 14 – 75.984
June 07 – 75.97
May 30 - 75.94
May 24 - 75.86
May 17 - 75.795
May 03 - 75.51
Apr 29 - 75.41
Apr 12 - 75.10
Mar 29 - 75.018
Mar 15 - 75.0
Mar 08 - 74.97
Feb 22 - 75.00
Feb 08 - 74.96
Jan 25 - 74.88
Jan 11 - 74.81
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2018
Dec 28 – 74.78
Dec 14 – 74.72
Nov 30 – 74.696
Nov 16 – 74.68
Nov 02 – 74.67
Oct 19 – 74.614
Oct 05 – 74.72
Sept 21 – 74.785
Sept 07 – 74.86
Aug 24 – 74.91
Aug 10 – 74.98
Jul 30 – 75.12
Jul 13 – 75.129
Jun 29 – 75.228
Jun 15 – 75.25
Jun 01 – 75.33
May 18 – 75.35
May 04 – 75.23
Apr 20 – 75.08
Apr 06 – 74.97
Mar 23 – 74.918
Mar 09 – 74.99
Feb 23 – 74.973
Feb 09 – 74.90
Jan 26 – 74.95
Jan 12 – 74.81 M
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2017
Dec 27 – 74.71 M
Dec 08 – 74.795
Nov 24 – 74.89
Nov 09 – 74.929
Oct 27 – 74.83
Oct 10 – 74.95
Sept 29 – 74.99
Sept 15 – 75.12
Sept 01 – 75.28
Aug 18 - 75.47
Aug 04 - 75.6
July 22 - 75.71

And courtesy of the IJC,, their numbers

International Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River Board
Conseil international du lac Ontario et du fleuve Saint-Laurent
The Lake Ontario outflow was reduced to 10,110 m3/s at 12:01 AM on August 21, 2019. This flow rate is 200 m3/s above the normal safe navigation flow limit that applies at the current Lake Ontario elevation as defined by the regulation plan. This flow remains a record-high value for this time of the year. The average Lake Ontario outflow is expected to remain at 10,110 m3/s for the coming week. Actual outflows will depend on conditions in the St. Lawrence River.
Week Ending: Average this time
Wed, 21 Aug 2019 of the year (c)
Lake Ontario / Lac Ontario
Actual end of week level: 75.48 (247.64) 74.86 (245.60)
Computed Plan 2014 Level (a): 75.56 (247.90)
Computed Preproject Level (b): 76.05 (249.51)
Weekly Mean Outflow: 10360 (365900) 7690 (271600)
Weekly Total Supply: 8440 (298100) 6430 (227100)
Lake St. Lawrence at Long Sault Dam 72.84 (238.98) 73.33 (240.58)
Weekly Mean Level:
Lake St. Louis at Pointe-Claire Weekly 21.80 (71.52) 21.20 (69.55)
Mean Level:
Montreal Harbour at Jetty #1 Weekly Mean 6.86 (22.51) 6.29 (20.64)
Level:
Ottawa River at Carillon Weekly Mean 830 (29300) 1130 (39900)
Outflow:
Preliminary Lake Ontario Outflow for Week 10110 (357000) 7630 (269400)
Ending Fri, 30 Aug 2019:
Levels are in metres (feet) IGLD 1985. Supply and flows are in cubic metres (feet) per second m³/s (ft³/s).
(a) Levels that would have occurred with strict adherence to Plan 2014.
(b) Levels that would have occurred had there been no Lake Ontario regulation.
(c) For comparison purposes, Lake Ontario water level data since 1918 are used to be consistent with those published in the US and Canadian Great Lakes bulletins (http://www.waterlevels.gc.ca/C&A/bulletin-eng.html). Other averages are for the periods as follows: Lake Ontario outflows and levels at Long Sault and Pointe-Claire since 1960; Montreal since 1967; and Ottawa River outflow at Carillon since 1963.
The regulation plan for Lake Ontario specifies a weekly average outflow from Saturday through the following Friday, inclusive. To provide timely information for the coming week to the hydropower and Seaway operators, and our readers, we complete the regulation plan calculations each Thursday. Our calculations use the data available at the time, which are from the previous seven days (Thursday through Wednesday). Since the two time periods do not exactly coincide, their data are usually slightly different.
The table shows the actual flow for the week ending Wednesday. It also gives the preliminary flow for the coming week ending Friday. We emphasize that this is the preliminary flow, since unforeseen flow changes may occur after we have issued our notice. When these flow changes occur, they are reflected in the subsequent week's notice.
Le tableau indique le débit réel hebdomadaire se terminant le mercredi. On trouve aussi le débit préliminaire de la semaine suivante se terminant le vendredi. Nous insistons sur le fait que ce débit est préliminaire, étant donné que des changements imprévisibles peuvent avoir lieu après l'envoi du message. Lorsque de tels changements surviennent, ils sont incorporés dans l'évaluation de la semaine suivante.
Information in this report is compiled from provisional data provided by: Environment & Climate Change Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Hydro Quebec, Ontario Power Generation Inc, the New York Power Authority, and the U.S. National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration.
Visit the Board's website at https://ijc.org/en/loslrb to find out more.
 
Likes: scotto

scotto

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Feb 15, 2004
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Attached is the Lake Ontario real time water levels for the month of August, a drop of approximately .35M. The top of the rail on the north wall of the Burlington Canal is just starting to show for the first time since last May. Hopefully we have a steady decline.


 
Likes: Opie

Opie

Registered User
Mar 1, 2017
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The lake level continues its decline but the IJC gets an F grade on their attempt. The IJC has had a chance to keep the upper hand on reducing the lake level over these past few weeks but instead each week they kept reducing the water out flow out from the Mosses Saunders dam-see below for current rate and compare it to previous post rate of 10,110 m3/s

Friday September 6th, the average level is at 75.386 M (247.329 Feet)

Per Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Since 2009, the September lake level average has been 74.78 M ( 245.34 Feet )
The average lake level for September 2017 was 75.08 M
Surface water temperature by the lift bridge is 16 C / 62.6 F

Next reading date is: Friday September 20th, 2019

Reading date / Lake Average 2019
Aug 23 – 75.51
Aug 16 – 75.585
Aug 09 – 75.65
Aug 02 – 75.72
July 26 – 75.78
July 19 - 75.85
July 11 - 75.89
July 05 - 75.93
June 28 - 75.95
June 21 - 75.95
June 14 – 75.984
June 07 – 75.97
May 30 - 75.94
May 24 - 75.86
May 17 - 75.795
May 03 - 75.51
Apr 29 - 75.41
Apr 12 - 75.10
Mar 29 - 75.018
Mar 15 - 75.0
Mar 08 - 74.97
Feb 22 - 75.00
Feb 08 - 74.96
Jan 25 - 74.88
Jan 11 - 74.81
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2018
Dec 28 – 74.78
Dec 14 – 74.72
Nov 30 – 74.696
Nov 16 – 74.68
Nov 02 – 74.67
Oct 19 – 74.614
Oct 05 – 74.72
Sept 21 – 74.785
Sept 07 – 74.86
Aug 24 – 74.91
Aug 10 – 74.98
Jul 30 – 75.12
Jul 13 – 75.129
Jun 29 – 75.228
Jun 15 – 75.25
Jun 01 – 75.33
May 18 – 75.35
May 04 – 75.23
Apr 20 – 75.08
Apr 06 – 74.97
Mar 23 – 74.918
Mar 09 – 74.99
Feb 23 – 74.973
Feb 09 – 74.90
Jan 26 – 74.95
Jan 12 – 74.81 M
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2017
Dec 27 – 74.71 M
Dec 08 – 74.795
Nov 24 – 74.89
Nov 09 – 74.929
Oct 27 – 74.83
Oct 10 – 74.95
Sept 29 – 74.99
Sept 15 – 75.12
Sept 01 – 75.28
Aug 18 - 75.47
Aug 04 - 75.6
July 22 - 75.71

And courtesy of the IJC,, their numbers

International Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River Board
Conseil international du lac Ontario et du fleuve Saint-Laurent
The average Lake Ontario outflow is expected to be 9,780 m³/s for the coming week. This flow rate is 200 m³/s above the normal safe navigation flow limit that applies at the current Lake Ontario elevation as defined by the regulation plan. Actual outflows will depend on conditions in the St. Lawrence River.
Week Ending: Average this time
Wed, 04 Sep 2019 of the year (c)
Lake Ontario / Lac Ontario
Actual end of week level: 75.35 (247.21) 74.82 (245.47)
Computed Plan 2014 Level (a): 75.44 (247.51)
Computed Preproject Level (b): 75.99 (249.31)
Weekly Mean Outflow: 10000 (353100) 7600 (268400)
Weekly Total Supply: 8090 (285700) 6330 (223500)
Lake St. Lawrence at Long Sault Dam 72.86 (239.04) 73.23 (240.26)
Weekly Mean Level:
Lake St. Louis at Pointe-Claire Weekly 21.72 (71.26) 21.16 (69.42)
Mean Level:
Montreal Harbour at Jetty #1 Weekly Mean 6.77 (22.21) 6.21 (20.37)
Level:
Ottawa River at Carillon Weekly Mean 760 (26800) 1070 (37800)
Outflow:
Preliminary Lake Ontario Outflow for Week 9780 (345400) 7550 (266600)
Ending Fri, 13 Sep 2019:
Levels are in metres (feet) IGLD 1985. Supply and flows are in cubic metres (feet) per second m³/s (ft³/s).
(a) Levels that would have occurred with strict adherence to Plan 2014.
(b) Levels that would have occurred had there been no Lake Ontario regulation.
(c) For comparison purposes, Lake Ontario water level data since 1918 are used to be consistent with those published in the US and Canadian Great Lakes bulletins (http://www.waterlevels.gc.ca/C&A/bulletin-eng.html). Other averages are for the periods as follows: Lake Ontario outflows and levels at Long Sault and Pointe-Claire since 1960; Montreal since 1967; and Ottawa River outflow at Carillon since 1963.
The regulation plan for Lake Ontario specifies a weekly average outflow from Saturday through the following Friday, inclusive. To provide timely information for the coming week to the hydropower and Seaway operators, and our readers, we complete the regulation plan calculations each Thursday. Our calculations use the data available at the time, which are from the previous seven days (Thursday through Wednesday). Since the two time periods do not exactly coincide, their data are usually slightly different.
The table shows the actual flow for the week ending Wednesday. It also gives the preliminary flow for the coming week ending Friday. We emphasize that this is the preliminary flow, since unforeseen flow changes may occur after we have issued our notice. When these flow changes occur, they are reflected in the subsequent week's notice.
Information in this report is compiled from provisional data provided by: Environment & Climate Change Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Hydro Quebec, Ontario Power Generation Inc, the New York Power Authority, and the U.S. National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration.
Visit the Board's website at https://ijc.org/en/loslrb to find out more.
 
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scotto

Administrator
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One week later and a check of the canal shows very little decline in the level, we have seemed to stalled at this level which if not altered could be a big problem for next year. I have added this article with a link to a questionnaire, take a look and fill it out you have been impacted. They also ask for pictures if you have any to contribute.
Many thanks to Edwin at the other Beach site for posting this.







Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Shoreline Landowners and Businesses 2019 High Water Impacts Questionnaire

How have you been impacted by high water levels along the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River shoreline in 2019?

Wet conditions throughout the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River basin in the spring of 2019 have resulted in record-high or near record-high water levels in each of the Great Lakes. These high water level conditions have caused tremendous challenges (which are still ongoing in certain areas) for people living and working along the Great Lakes – St. Lawrence River shoreline including direct damages to their homes and valued property.
The IJC’s Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Adaptive Management (GLAM) Committee is working closely with the IJC’s International Lake Ontario – St. Lawrence River Board (ILOSLRB) and the International Lake Superior Board of Control (ILSBC) to reach out to property and business owners who have been directly affected by the high water levels in 2019. The committee is hoping you will provide information through this voluntary on-line questionnaire to describe the impacts you have experienced. Your input will be invaluable to the committee in evaluating and improving the scientific and engineering models that have been developed to estimate potential damages under a range of Great Lakes water level conditions. Such evaluation is a critical requirement for the GLAM Committee as it assesses the performance of the regulation plans that are used to manage outflows from Lake Superior and Lake Ontario. The information will also be made available to the ILOSLRB and the ILSBC to support their ongoing operational activities. Data provided through the questionnaire will only be reported in a summarized format to ensure the privacy of respondents.
After some basic location questions, you can choose to:
  • Complete the full questionnaire and upload photos (encouraged)
  • Just upload photos
  • Just complete the questionnaire
If you choose to share any photos, please submit a file size no larger than 8MB in size.
The questionnaire should take about 20 minutes to complete, depending on extent of impacts being reported on. You are encouraged to complete the questionnaire once you know all of your property impacts. Should you wish to update your information at a later date in response to new or changing conditions and impacts, please complete the questionnaire again using the same address you used in the original questionnaire.
A similar questionnaire was made available on behalf of the GLAM Committee for residents of the Lake Ontario – St. Lawrence River shoreline following high water levels in 2017. Information from that questionnaire was included in the GLAM Report summarizing 2017 conditions. A brief fact sheet on the results of the 2017 online questionnaire is also available.
If you experience technical difficulties while completing the questionnaire, or have questions about the questionnaire, please contact the GLAM Committee at GLAM@ijc.org.

PLEASE CLICK HERE TO COMPLETE THE QUESTIONNAIRE AND/OR SUBMIT PHOTOS!

** This questionnaire is a modified version of one previously developed at Cornell University with support from New York Sea Grant that was conducted along the USA Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River Shoreline in the summer of 2017 and then adapted by the GLAM Committee in the fall 2017 and covered all of Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River. It has been modified again to allow responses for the entire Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River system.
Contact Us
Location
Mike Shantz, Canadian Secretary
Hydrology Operations East, MSC Monitoring and Data Services Directorate
Environment and Climate Change Canada
867 Lakeshore Road
Burlington ON L7S 1A1
Canada
Phone
905-336-4956
Contact
Location
Bryce Carmichael, U.S. Secretary
United States, OH
United States
 

Opie

Registered User
Mar 1, 2017
267
82
28
The Beach Strip
Scott, a big thanks for the above to Edwin

Also thankful for the rain at midnight, my lawn is in bad need of water coming off the August drought we had in the area.

Came across this Global TV news article this morning, if you click the link you can also watch the short segment

https://globalnews.ca/news/5885071/st-lawrence-river-business-owner-flooding/

‘They can help and they are ignoring us’ says St. Lawrence River business owner amid flooding



WATCH: A business owner along the St. Lawrence River, and multiple Thousand Island politicians, are urging the International Joint Commission to make changes to water levels in the St. Lawrence River after several years of destructive flooding.


Is there a quick fix to the rising water levels on the St. Lawrence River? Yes, according to several Thousand Island politicians.
Michael Barrett, MP for Leeds-Grenville-Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes, along with Corinna Smith-Gatcke, mayor of the Township of Leeds and The 1000 Islands, are urging the International Joint Commission to increase the amount of outflow at the Moses-Saunders Dam near Cornwall, Ontario.



“By increasing the outflow of water at the dam, we can lower water levels in the St. Lawrence River. The IJC has failed to do so, and we’re seeing the impacts of this now,” said Smith-Gatcke.

The IJC manages boundary waters between Canada and the United States, which includes regulating outflows of Lake Ontario into the St. Lawrence River in accordance with the Regulation Plan 2014. The plan was initiated by the IJC in fall, 2016, replacing Plan 1958DD after over 50 years in effect.
“I’ve lost revenue each year since the plan 2014 because my property, and my customers’ property, have been flooded two of the past three years since it started,” said Scott MacCrimmon, part owner and president of Hucks Marine and Resort.
MacCrimmon says he contacted his local politicians for help during the spring when the risk of flooding became imminent. Both Barrett and Smith-Gatcke received his plea, among others, and planned several meetings with the IJC throughout the summer to find a solution.
“I wanted to get across to the IJC that there are people who feel they aren’t cared about and are left to deal with the flooding,” said Smith-Gatcke.
“I thought the meetings were productive and the IJC confirmed that they would meet with us during the second week of September, and they cancelled, which is disappointing,” said Barrett.
WATCH: House demolitions begin in QC town ravaged by spring flooding

The two politicians wanted to address Plan 2014 before its too late. They both told Global News that if the outflow increased during the fall, the water levels would be low going into spring 2020, providing a cushion as water levels tend to increase after the winter.
“If we don’t empty the glass and get it back down to where it should be, it means next spring we will be in for it worse than this year,” said Smith-Gatcke.
Global News attempted to contact the IJC several items over two days, but has yet to receive a response.
As for MacCrimmon and the future of the marina, he says they will continue to adjust to the increasing water levels but says he hopes this isn’t a new reality for his business.
“They [IJC] can help, and they are ignoring us,” said MacCimmon as he showed Global News the areas that were underwater just months prior.




© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.
 
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