Plan 2014 (High Lake Levels)

Opie

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Good news, seems even with the rain we received this week the lake level has started to go down a bit.


Friday June 21st, the average level is at 75.95 M (249.18 Feet)

Per Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Since 2008, the June lake level average has been 75.16 M
The average lake level for June 2017 was 75.81 M
Surface water temperature by the lift bridge is 9C / 48 F

Next reading date is: Friday June 28th, 2019

Reading date / Lake Average 2019
June 14 – 75.984
June 07 – 75.97
May 30 – 75.94
May 24 – 75.86
May 17 – 75.795
May 03 – 75.51
Apr 29 – 75.41
Apr 12 – 75.10
Mar 29 – 75.018
Mar 15 – 75.0
Mar 08 – 74.97
Feb 22 – 75.00
Feb 08 – 74.96
Jan 25 – 74.88
Jan 11 – 74.81
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2018
Dec 28 – 74.78
Dec 14 – 74.72
Nov 30 – 74.696
Nov 16 – 74.68
Nov 02 – 74.67
Oct 19 – 74.614
Oct 05 – 74.72
Sept 21 – 74.785
Sept 07 – 74.86
Aug 24 – 74.91
Aug 10 – 74.98
Jul 30 – 75.12
Jul 13 – 75.129
Jun 29 – 75.228
Jun 15 – 75.25
Jun 01 – 75.33
May 18 – 75.35
May 04 – 75.23
Apr 20 – 75.08
Apr 06 – 74.97
Mar 23 – 74.918
Mar 09 – 74.99
Feb 23 – 74.973
Feb 09 – 74.90
Jan 26 – 74.95
Jan 12 – 74.81 M
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2017
Dec 27 – 74.71 M
Dec 08 – 74.795
Nov 24 – 74.89
Nov 09 – 74.929
Oct 27 – 74.83
Oct 10 – 74.95
Sept 29 – 74.99
Sept 15 – 75.12
Sept 01 – 75.28
Aug 18 - 75.47
Aug 04 - 75.6
July 22 - 75.71

Updated forecast for 2019 & Experimental 5 year forecast from the Army Corps of Engineers.

 
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"Friday June 21st, the average level is at 75.95 M (249.18 Feet)"

We seem to a small lowering of the lake level then it comes right back up, we haven't moved since the end of May.



 
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Opie

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here is a link to an article with a 4 minute video clip from the air

https://www.northcountrypublicradio...f-lake-ontario-and-st-lawrence-river-flooding


Watch: A bird's eye tour of Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River flooding
See what the wettest year on record looks like from the air. Pilot Bob Keller of Lighthawk and John Peach, Executive Director of Save the River...

Jun 21, 2019 — by Doyle Dean (Production Manager) , in Watertown, New York

Jun 21, 2019 — See what the wettest year on record looks like from the air. Pilot Bob Keller of Lighthawk and John Peach, Executive Director of Save the River take us from Henderson Harbor, near Watertown, up through the Thousand Islands to Morristown. Here's what they see.
 
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https://northumberland897.ca/news/2019/6/23/flood-warning-lake-ontariobay-of-quinte

Flood Warning (Lake Ontario/Bay of Quinte)
Collin Whitehouse

June 23, 2019
Lower Trent Conservation advises municipalities and the public that the Flood Warning for Lake Ontario and the Bay of Quinte issued on May 9th, 2019 is still in effect.
Water levels on Lake Ontario increased through the months of April and May to reach record levels in the month of June. Over the past week or so the water levels have stabilized and are expected to slowly begin to decline. High water levels on Lake Ontario can be expected well into July.
Record high outflows from Lake Ontario are being managed by the International Lake Ontario St. Lawrence River Board (ILOSLRB) to try to lower the Lake Ontario water levels to provide relief for shoreline owners. The ILOSLRB consider the effects of these high flows downstream in the St. Lawrence River, where flooding is still occurring. Outflows from Lake Ontario have been at 10,400 m3/s since June 13.
The water level measured at Cobourg is currently at 75.90 masl (metres above sea level) which is 20 cm above the Lake Ontario 100-year flood elevation of 75.70 masl and 2 cm above the previous record level from 2017.
Forecasts by the ILOSLRB indicate that the water levels in Lake Ontario are not expected to rise further and will likely continue a slow decline over the coming week under most scenarios. The water levels will continue to decline in general through the summer, with the rate of decline largely dependent on rainfall. Surge related flooding and erosion damage from high waves is possible during periods of strong onshore winds. Residents should pay close attention to weather forecasts for approaching storm systems with high southeast, south or southwest winds. There are no wind warnings in effect at the time of the writing of this bulletin.
Property owners are also reminded that any work along the shoreline (e.g. placement of fill, armour stone, etc.) will require a permit from Lower Trent Conservation and should visit the website (www.LTC.on.ca) for more information.
Residents living in low-lying, flood prone areas should take actions to protect themselves and their property. Homeowners affected by flooding should also be aware that electrical, well and septic issues may exist. The public should pay attention to Health Unit guidelines to ensure safe drinking water.
Lower Trent Conservation monitors water levels and weather forecasts as part of its flood forecasting and warning program. If you have concerns about water levels, please contact Lower Trent Conservation at (613) 394-4829.
An update to this Flood Warning for Lake Ontario/Bay of Quinte will be provided on, or before, Friday, July 5th 2019. Additional statements will be issued if conditions are expected to change significantly from this outlook.
A Flood Warning is issued when flooding is beginning/occurring or when more serious flooding is possible. A Flood Warning requires action that may include the activation of the municipal flood emergency plan, warning residents or businesses in specific affected areas, and in some cases evacuation.
 
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Opie

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news from around the lake

Waiting for The Wave: What can Hamilton do to stave off climate-change flooding?
Faced with record-high water levels and waves that have already reached two storeys, Hamilton is working on a plan. But it won’t be cheap.
News 05:00 AM by Matthew Van Dongen The Hamilton Spectator



Hamilton firefighters step carefully through high water as they help Maggie Thibodeau, carrying dog Carrie, to safety after several homes were flooded on Church Street at Green Road in Stoney Creek in April 2018. The flooding was caused by waves and heavy rains. - Barry Gray,Hamilton Spectator

Barbara Hedley chuckled as she peered into her beach strip basement to watch a record-high Lake Ontario slowly invade through cracks in the concrete floor.
Her sump pump — frantically spitting water onto Beach Boulevard within view of dozens of neighbouring emergency fountains — can't keep up with historic lake levels saturating the narrow sandbar separating bay and lake.
The 77-year-old is unfazed.





"Basement flooding is the price you pay to live on the beach," said the lakeside lifer, shrugging off her waterlogged ping pong table and floating Christmas decorations. "I've seen a lot worse."

Worse includes "tiptoeing" precariously on wood planks across sewage-flooded streets when hurricane Hazel and Connie swamped the low-lying beach community in the 1950s. Or two decades later, when her son was able to float toy boats in the basement during a particularly violent storm.
That's why Hedley worries more about The Wave. Increasingly, so do city planners.
MORE: Why is Lake Ontario so high?
Sure, Lake Ontario has hit record heights twice in three years and continues to hover around 85 centimetres above average even now. But experts say high water is much more of a risk to people and property when paired with high winds blowing in the wrong direction. (In Hamilton, that's northeasterly.)
Consider: in April of last year, 90 kilometre per hour winds whipped up Lake Ontario waves nearly six metres in height — two storeys high!
That's the highest wave on the lake in the last 45 years, according to historical modelling done for the city by Shoreplan Engineering. At the time, lake levels were up, but not nearly as high as today.

for the complete article

https://www.thespec.com/news-story/9454299-waiting-for-the-wave-what-can-hamilton-do-to-stave-off-climate-change-flooding-/


 
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Posted with permission from the Hamilton Spectator
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
https://www.thespec.com/news-story/9454239-why-is-lake-ontario-so-high-/
Why is Lake Ontario so high?
Some people blame climate change and poor regulation of lake outflows. Regardless, all the Great Lakes — not just Ontario — are brimming this year.
June 27th, 2019 by Matthew Van Dongen The Hamilton Spectator



High water levels flood the area around the Leander Boat Club in May. - Scott Gardner , Hamilton Spectator


A swan swims around the bottom of a tree with its base submerged in flood water near the docks at the Hamilton Bay Sailing Club. The high water levels caused by heavy rain in April and May 2017 caused problems with many of the docks at the club. - Cathie Coward , Hamilton Spectator


In February, Ron Lane’s home at 13 First Private Rd. had a huge build up of ice against his property. Even in February residents on First Private Road were worried about spring flooding. - Gary Yokoyama , Hamilton Spectator

If it makes you feel better about your soggy basement, Lake Ontario is higher this year at least in part because someone downstream is in even worse shape.
Hamilton's home lake hit historic heights June 1 and kept rising to 75.92 metres above sea level before stabilizing in recent days. That's close to 90 centimetres above average.
That record is partly the result of May efforts by a board of control to "slow the flow" out of Lake Ontario via a dam at Cornwall, said Robert Caldwell, the board's Canadian secretary.

Stockpiling water behind a hydro dam offered relief to thousands of flooded homeowners downstream along the St. Lawrence River near Montreal, where a swollen Ottawa River also empties out. But it also drove up water levels on Lake Ontario, to the dismay of nearshore homeowners.
"We're trying to balance flooding impacts on people upstream and downstream, and there are not a lot of levers," said Caldwell. He noted there is no control dam for Lake Erie, which has dumped record flows into Lake Ontario.
MORE: Waiting for the wave
The board has now opened the spigot at the Moses Saunders Dam to allow more than 10,400 cubic metres of water per second out of the gates — a rate so high it affects navigation on the St. Lawrence Seaway.
But the larger problem, experts say, is too much water just about everywhere this spring.
Lakes Erie and Superior also hit record heights this spring. More rainfall than normal, combined with huge snow melt, swelled not only the upper lakes but also the Ottawa River.
Can you blame all that extra water on climate change?



Not necessarily. The Great Lakes rise and fall in cycles. Six years ago, waterfront residents worried about record low water levels on some lakes.








But models suggest we should brace for severe weather, earlier spring melt cycles and "more extreme" lake level highs and lows, said Brock University professor Liette Vasseur, who is studying climate change impacts on coastal cities.
Critics still argue the board of control could have anticipated the high water levels and allowed Lake Ontario to drop further late last fall.
Some politicians — particularly on the U.S. side — blame a relatively new set of lake level regulations, dubbed Plan 2014, which are meant to allow Lake Ontario to rise and fall more naturally to aid wetland preservation. This week, Hamilton Liberal MP Bob Bratina also called for a review of those regulations.
Caldwell, though, says the board is in a "pick your poison" situation thanks to the unique pinch-points in the St. Lawrence River.
Taking a foot off the top of Lake Ontario in a hurry, for example, would cause water levels to spike near Montreal. At the same time, levels would drop dramatically near the dam — the area Caldwell calls "the drain in the bathtub" — and endanger drinking water intakes.
"We don't believe the (regulatory) plan is to blame," he said.
Related:
Lake Ontario's water levels are rising. Here's why that threatens Hamilton.
Menacing the Islands, Lake Ontario has risen to its highest level on record
City of Hamilton battles rising water levels
'Visually stunning' ice wall is a risk to public safety, says Niagara Parks Commission

mvandongen@thespec.com
905-526-3241 | @Mattatthespec
 
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scotto

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Checking our canal water level meter, seems to be standing slightly above the crest of the 2017 level, just above the second ladder rail.

canal.JPG

And on the Blvd we have some sand bagging to keep the water from going back onto the low sitting properties.

sandbage.JPG
 
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Opie

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The lake level remains unchanged for the week – still too high

Friday June 28th, the average level is at 75.95 M (249.18 Feet)

Per Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Since 2008, the June lake level average has been 75.16 M
The average lake level for June 2017 was 75.81 M
Surface water temperature by the lift bridge is 12C / 53.6 F

Next reading date is: Friday July 5th, 2019

Reading date / Lake Average 2019
June 21 – 75.95
June 14 – 75.984
June 07 – 75.97
May 30 – 75.94
May 24 – 75.86
May 17 – 75.795
May 03 – 75.51
Apr 29 – 75.41
Apr 12 – 75.10
Mar 29 – 75.018
Mar 15 – 75.0
Mar 08 – 74.97
Feb 22 – 75.00
Feb 08 – 74.96
Jan 25 – 74.88
Jan 11 – 74.81
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2018
Dec 28 – 74.78
Dec 14 – 74.72
Nov 30 – 74.696
Nov 16 – 74.68
Nov 02 – 74.67
Oct 19 – 74.614
Oct 05 – 74.72
Sept 21 – 74.785
Sept 07 – 74.86
Aug 24 – 74.91
Aug 10 – 74.98
Jul 30 – 75.12
Jul 13 – 75.129
Jun 29 – 75.228
Jun 15 – 75.25
Jun 01 – 75.33
May 18 – 75.35
May 04 – 75.23
Apr 20 – 75.08
Apr 06 – 74.97
Mar 23 – 74.918
Mar 09 – 74.99
Feb 23 – 74.973
Feb 09 – 74.90
Jan 26 – 74.95
Jan 12 – 74.81 M
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2017
Dec 27 – 74.71 M
Dec 08 – 74.795
Nov 24 – 74.89
Nov 09 – 74.929
Oct 27 – 74.83
Oct 10 – 74.95
Sept 29 – 74.99
Sept 15 – 75.12
Sept 01 – 75.28
Aug 18 - 75.47
Aug 04 - 75.6
July 22 - 75.71

Updated forecast for 2019 & Experimental 5 year forecast from the Army Corps of Engineers.


 
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Opie

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News from around the lakes

https://london.ctvnews.ca/more-than-700-homes-in-erosion-hazard-zone-along-lake-huron-shoreline-1.4494233

http://www.startribune.com/great-lakes-high-water-could-hurt-shipping-industry-warns/512239682/


Friday July 5th, the average level is at 75.93 M (249.11 Feet)

Per Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Since 2008, the July lake level average has been 75.12 M
The average lake level for July 2017 was 75.69 M
Surface water temperature by the lift bridge is 15C / 59 F

Next reading date is: Thursday July 11th, 2019

Reading date / Lake Average 2019
June 28 – 75.95
June 21 – 75.95
June 14 – 75.984
June 07 – 75.97
May 30 – 75.94
May 24 – 75.86
May 17 – 75.795
May 03 – 75.51
Apr 29 – 75.41
Apr 12 – 75.10
Mar 29 – 75.018
Mar 15 – 75.0
Mar 08 – 74.97
Feb 22 – 75.00
Feb 08 – 74.96
Jan 25 – 74.88
Jan 11 – 74.81
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2018
Dec 28 – 74.78
Dec 14 – 74.72
Nov 30 – 74.696
Nov 16 – 74.68
Nov 02 – 74.67
Oct 19 – 74.614
Oct 05 – 74.72
Sept 21 – 74.785
Sept 07 – 74.86
Aug 24 – 74.91
Aug 10 – 74.98
Jul 30 – 75.12
Jul 13 – 75.129
Jun 29 – 75.228
Jun 15 – 75.25
Jun 01 – 75.33
May 18 – 75.35
May 04 – 75.23
Apr 20 – 75.08
Apr 06 – 74.97
Mar 23 – 74.918
Mar 09 – 74.99
Feb 23 – 74.973
Feb 09 – 74.90
Jan 26 – 74.95
Jan 12 – 74.81 M
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2017
Dec 27 – 74.71 M
Dec 08 – 74.795
Nov 24 – 74.89
Nov 09 – 74.929
Oct 27 – 74.83
Oct 10 – 74.95
Sept 29 – 74.99
Sept 15 – 75.12
Sept 01 – 75.28
Aug 18 - 75.47
Aug 04 - 75.6
July 22 - 75.71

Updated forecast for 2019 & Experimental 5 year forecast from the Army Corps of Engineers.

 
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scotto

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Friday July 5th, the average level is at 75.93 M (249.11 Feet)

Per Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Since 2008, the July lake level average has been 75.12 M
The average lake level for July 2017 was 75.69 M
Once again, not much of a change, but if there is any trend, the level is easing down slowly.

Check the daily lake level from the beginning of May until today, very slight drop but not the record levels that we had last month.
The blue line represents 76m above sea level.

May 2019
May.jpg


June 2019
June.jpg


July 2019 up to the 5th

July.jpg


It seems the tide is finally turning.

After a long season where the water level in Lake Ontario was steadily increasing, things are now heading in the opposite direction. The Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board is reporting that the mean daily water level was at 75.89 metres on July 1, meaning it had dropped two centimetre over the preceding week.

The latest water level is three centimetres below this year’s peak level, recorded on June 15, but remains 84 centimetres above average and one centimetre above the record daily peak level of 75.88 metres recorded in late May 2017. Record-high outflows continue to be released, to continue the decline.

Whole article;
https://www.insidehalton.com/news-s...m28bbjzlgg8w9mvqhndufw8#.XSD-IZgbllc.facebook
 
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scotto

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And some not-so good news
_______________________________________________

High water levels will persist for months even if weather cooperates
Published: 07/08/2019 @ 05:27 am

Those who live near the shores of Lake Ontario and are hoping for fast relief from this year’s floodwaters are likely to be disappointed.
It probably will be months before the lake returns to normal levels — and even that’s not a sure thing.

The water in Lake Ontario has been at or above its previous record high since May 31. Even under the best-case scenario of little precipitation and plenty of warm sunshine to accelerate evaporation, experts estimate only a 7-inch decline in lake levels by the end of July.

That would still leave the lake more than 2 feet higher than its long-term average for that time of year. Projections say the lake could still be a foot above average in November.

https://fingerlakes1.com/2019/07/08...ersist-for-months-even-if-weather-cooperates/
 

scotto

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Outflows unchanged as water levels drop

The International Lake Ontario – Saint Lawrence River Board decided on Friday to maintain its current outflow rates for Lake Ontario down the St. Lawrence River as water levels on the lake begin to drop.
“We’ve been passing record high flows since June,” said Rob Caldwell, Canadian secretary manager at the International Joint Commission (IJC), to whom the board reports who noted Lake Ontario’s water levels have dropped nine centimetres over the past month.
The outflow rate from the Moses-Saunders Power Dam in Cornwall is at 10,400 cubic metres per second, bolstering unprecedented currents along the St. Lawrence River.
“They have never seen these conditions before,” said Caldwell.
Reducing Lake Ontario’s water level while mitigating flooding across both Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River has been a difficult balancing act for the IJC. Caldwell compared the lake to a bathtub being drained by straw, as the dams in Cornwall are the only outflow control mechanisms for the massive body of water.
To create an additional one-centimetre drop in Lake Ontario, for example, the outflow rate would have to increase by 320 cubic metres per second for a week. This would cause a 20-centimetre drop to Lake St. Lawrence — the stretch between the Iroquois control dam and the Moses-Saunders dam in Cornwall — and a 12-centimetre increase along the Port of Montreal.
Furthermore, any increase to the outflow would force the Seaway to shut down due to currents being too strong, causing an estimated $50 million in losses per day to businesses who rely on shipping and travel down the river.

Read whole article;
https://www.recorder.ca/news/local-news/outflows-unchanged-as-water-levels-drop
 
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News for our backyard / harbour

Western shoreline of Hamilton Harbour confirmed to have blue-green algae
July 10 2019
HAMILTON, ON - Public Health Services has confirmed the presence of toxin-producing blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) at the Bayfront Park Boat Launch, Pier 4, Harbour West Marina, and throughout the marinas on Macassa Bay.
Contact with blue-green algae should be avoided due to the potential health risks associated with it. Residents and visitors are advised to:
  • Avoid all contact with the water along the western shoreline of Hamilton Harbour, including while launching or trailering watercraft.
  • If you do come in contact with the water, wash yourself off as soon as possible with clean water. Facilities for hand washing and rinsing off are available at the Bayfront Park Public Washrooms located at the east side of the Bayfront Park parking lot.
  • Do not swim or wade (or allow your pets to swim or wade) in any areas where blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) is visible.
Health Effects
Adverse health effects are mainly caused by drinking the water that is contaminated with blue-green algae toxins. People who come into contact with visible blue-green algae or ingest water containing blue-green algae may experience skin irritation, rash, sore throat, sore red eyes, swollen lips, fever, nausea and vomiting and/or diarrhea.
Anyone who has recently been in direct contact with the waters along the western shoreline of Hamilton Harbour and is experiencing headaches, fever, diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea or vomiting is advised to contact their primary care provider (family physician, nurse practitioner or walk-in clinic).
Quick Facts
  • Blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) forms in shallow, warm, slow-moving or still waters.
  • Temperature fluctuations (i.e. increased water temperature), high nutrient loads, water mixing, slow-moving or still waters, provide the ideal environment for the proliferation of naturally occurring blue-green algae.
  • Algae/vegetation in the water can give off an offensive odour as it dies and decays. This may be more prominent along the shoreline and in the various “nooks and crannies” (i.e. docks/boat slips).
  • The blue-green algae is expected to subside as the cooler weather arrives. Locally, algae blooms have been observed until late November, early December.
  • The safety of Hamilton’s drinking water is not affected by this situation.
Additional Resources


Thursday July 11th, the average level is at 75.89 M (248.98 Feet)

Per Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Since 2008, the July lake level average has been 75.12 M
The average lake level for July 2017 was 75.69 M
Surface water temperature by the lift bridge is 17C / 62.6 F

Next reading date is: Friday July 19th, 2019

Reading date / Lake Average 2019
July 05 – 75.93
June 28 – 75.95
June 21 – 75.95
June 14 – 75.984
June 07 – 75.97
May 30 – 75.94
May 24 – 75.86
May 17 – 75.795
May 03 – 75.51
Apr 29 – 75.41
Apr 12 – 75.10
Mar 29 – 75.018
Mar 15 – 75.0
Mar 08 – 74.97
Feb 22 – 75.00
Feb 08 – 74.96
Jan 25 – 74.88
Jan 11 – 74.81
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2018
Dec 28 – 74.78
Dec 14 – 74.72
Nov 30 – 74.696
Nov 16 – 74.68
Nov 02 – 74.67
Oct 19 – 74.614
Oct 05 – 74.72
Sept 21 – 74.785
Sept 07 – 74.86
Aug 24 – 74.91
Aug 10 – 74.98
Jul 30 – 75.12
Jul 13 – 75.129
Jun 29 – 75.228
Jun 15 – 75.25
Jun 01 – 75.33
May 18 – 75.35
May 04 – 75.23
Apr 20 – 75.08
Apr 06 – 74.97
Mar 23 – 74.918
Mar 09 – 74.99
Feb 23 – 74.973
Feb 09 – 74.90
Jan 26 – 74.95
Jan 12 – 74.81 M
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2017
Dec 27 – 74.71 M
Dec 08 – 74.795
Nov 24 – 74.89
Nov 09 – 74.929
Oct 27 – 74.83
Oct 10 – 74.95
Sept 29 – 74.99
Sept 15 – 75.12
Sept 01 – 75.28
Aug 18 - 75.47
Aug 04 - 75.6
July 22 - 75.71
 
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Water levels are rising and traffic has been impacted at the Burlington Canal Lift Bridge
By
Dominick Nagy
-
July 13, 2019, 9:12 pm


The arms come down one by one stopping traffic over the Burlington Canal Lift Bridge.
A final siren signals the impending lift climbing more than thirty metres above the lake, something that’s happening more often this summer.
The federal agency that operates the bridge says the high-level of Lake Ontario means clearance has been significantly impacted. Boats that used to be able to pass underneath now need the bridge raised.
Lake Ontario hit a record high in June but thanks in part to warmer, drier weather it has started to decline.
The only real gripe mentioned was when the bridge is raised during rush hour something at least one driver would prefer wasn’t done.

https://www.chch.com/water-levels-a...Y90TZG9yZiLjkLFb5Ku2PIN_D9tFr5ngaGq-taJ_zCEY8



It's happened before: The long history of flooding on Lake Ontario


“When you look at the amount of water coming into the system from the other lakes, as well as precipitation, clearly that’s not from [Plan 2014]. That’s from the weather.”

Read whole story;
https://www.northcountrypublicradio...-the-long-history-of-flooding-on-lake-ontario
 
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Opie

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Now that the lake level is starting to go down, Mother Nature is giving us back a smallish beach but its a beach. Took a couple pictures of what it looks like now and posted a couple shots from last spring (2018) to compare how far we still have to go

Looking towards the Lift Bridge


last spring


Looking towards Confederation Park


last spring
 
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The debris in the 2018 photo was easy to clean up, we piled up the logs up onto the grass. I was told that wood made for some good late night fires on the beach during the summer. Yesterday I started to clean it up but it was hard, the current debris consists more of tiny plastic pieces and requires more intense scrutiny. It would be nice to think that one of the Sandboni machines we have down here might make an appearance towards this end of the beach. It gets really bad as you get towards the lift bridge and pier, items get stuck in there from the lack of current.
 
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scotto

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The debris in the 2018 photo was easy to clean up, we piled up the logs up onto the grass. I was told that wood made for some good late night fires on the beach during the summer. Yesterday I started to clean it up but it was hard, the current debris consists more of tiny plastic pieces and requires more intense scrutiny. It would be nice to think that one of the Sandboni machines we have down here might make an appearance towards this end of the beach. It gets really bad as you get towards the lift bridge and pier, items get stuck in there from the lack of current.
I was speaking with Chad Collins yesterday at the garage sale and the topic of the "Sandboni" was brought up by anther resident. Chad sad the old machine was basically a lemon and was broke down more than it was working. Good news though, a new one is on order and hopefully here and working by the end of August.
 
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