Plan 2014 (High Lake Levels)

scotto

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Attached is the Lake Ontario daily water levels, once again no real change for the whole month of January and if you check past data listed in this thread, this is the time of year when the levels start to inch back up. We will be watching the levels closely to see if this is the case, hopefully the levels do recede somewhat more.





Lake Ontario sets new outflow record in 2019
December 30, 2019

Cornwall's Moses-Saunders Dam during a summer month (Nick Seebruch/ Seaway News).
ONTARIO – Lake Ontario saw record breaking outflows this year with an average outflow from June through December of 9,560 m3/s (337,600 cfs), the highest flow ever released over this period of time since the start of records in 1900.
Beginning Tuesday, Dec. 31, outflows will be increased as much as possible until ice formation resumes on the St. Lawrence River, according to a press release from the International Lake Ontario – St. Lawrence River Board. Rates of flow are expected to increase in the New Year.
“A flow increase from 8,850 m3/s (312,500 cfs) to over 10,000 m3/s (353,000 cfs) may be possible in the coming days, with the exact amount depending on ice and water level conditions in the St. Lawrence River. Water levels downstream of the Moses-Saunders Dam, including around the Montreal area, are expected to rise, but will be monitored closely to ensure they are maintained below flood levels,” read a statement in the press release.
Lake Ontario outflows first set record rates in June as water levels of Lake Ontario reached a new daily record high following immense water levels and flows occurring across the Great Lakes and Ottawa River basins during the spring.
“High outflows from Lake Ontario continued through the summer, fall and early winter, resulting in more water released from Lake Ontario during the last seven months of 2019 than in any year since the start of records in 1900,” read a statement in the press release.
Inflows to Lake Ontario have also remained high, recorded at 75.00 m (246.06 ft.) on Sunday, Dec. 29, which is well above the seasonal average. High inflows are expected to continue into 2020.
Over the past several weeks, outflows were set at 200 m3/s (7,100 cfs) above the Plan 2014 maximum L-limit, which is the highest outflow that can be released from Lake Ontario. Safe navigation standards were maintained and the constraint outlined will no longer apply as of Tuesday, Dec. 31.
“The International Lake Ontario – St. Lawrence River Board, under authority granted to it by the International Joint Commission, will continue to deviate from Plan 2014 and will look for any and all opportunities to remove additional water from Lake Ontario prior to the spring,” read a statement in the press release, maintaining that staff monitor conditions on an ongoing basis.
Information on hydrologic conditions, water levels and outflows, including graphics and photos, are available on the Board’s website and posted to the Board’s Facebook page here. More detailed information on the process is available here.


Whole article;
https://www.cornwallseawaynews.com/2019/12/30/lake-ontario-sets-new-outflow-record-in-2019/
 
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Opie

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The above article is welcoming news finally and just released by the board " The Lake Ontario outflow is expected to be 10700 m³/s for the start of the coming week. Actual outflows will depend on conditions in the St. Lawrence River and outflows will be decreased if ice formation resumes this week "
 
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Opie

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Friday January 3rd, the average level is at 75.065 M (246.27 Feet)

Per Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Since 2009, the January lake level average has been 74.62 M ( 244.81 Feet )
The average lake level for January 2017 was 74.62 M ( 244.81 Feet )

( take note that the datum from 2019 has not been calculated yet into the figures )

Surface water temperature by the lift bridge is 5.5 C / 42 F


Reading date / Lake Average 2019
Dec 20 – 75.07
Dec 06 – 75.03
Nov 22 – 75.05
Nov 08 – 75.105
Oct 25 – 75.03
Oct 11 – 75.11
Sept 20 – 75.28
Sept 06 – 75.386
Aug 23 – 75.51
Aug 16 – 75.585
Aug 09 – 75.65
Aug 02 – 75.72
July 26 – 75.78
July 19 - 75.85
July 11 - 75.89
July 05 - 75.93
June 28 - 75.95
June 21 - 75.95
June 14 – 75.984
June 07 – 75.97
May 30 - 75.94
May 24 - 75.86
May 17 - 75.795
May 03 - 75.51
Apr 29 - 75.41
Apr 12 - 75.10
Mar 29 - 75.018
Mar 15 - 75.0
Mar 08 - 74.97
Feb 22 - 75.00
Feb 08 - 74.96
Jan 25 - 74.88
Jan 11 - 74.81
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2018
Dec 28 – 74.78
Dec 14 – 74.72
Nov 30 – 74.696
Nov 16 – 74.68
Nov 02 – 74.67
Oct 19 – 74.614
Oct 05 – 74.72
Sept 21 – 74.785
Sept 07 – 74.86
Aug 24 – 74.91
Aug 10 – 74.98
Jul 30 – 75.12
Jul 13 – 75.129
Jun 29 – 75.228
Jun 15 – 75.25
Jun 01 – 75.33
May 18 – 75.35
May 04 – 75.23
Apr 20 – 75.08
Apr 06 – 74.97
Mar 23 – 74.918
Mar 09 – 74.99
Feb 23 – 74.973
Feb 09 – 74.90
Jan 26 – 74.95
Jan 12 – 74.81 M
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2017
Dec 27 – 74.71 M
Dec 08 – 74.795
Nov 24 – 74.89
Nov 09 – 74.929
Oct 27 – 74.83
Oct 10 – 74.95
Sept 29 – 74.99
Sept 15 – 75.12
Sept 01 – 75.28
Aug 18 - 75.47
Aug 04 - 75.6
July 22 - 75.71

And courtesy of the IJC,, their numbers

International Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River Board
The Lake Ontario outflow is expected to be 10700 m³/s for the start of the coming week. Actual outflows will depend on conditions in the St. Lawrence River and outflows will be decreased if ice formation resumes this week. For more information: https://ijc.org/en/loslrb/lake-ontario-outflow-sets-records-2019-further-increases-expected-new-year
Week Ending: Average this time
Wed, 01 Jan 2020 of the year (c)
Lake Ontario / Lac Ontario
Actual end of week level: 75.01 (246.10) 74.54 (244.55)
Computed Plan 2014 Level (a): 75.13 (246.49)
Computed Preproject Level (b): 75.77 (248.59)
Weekly Mean Outflow: 9170 (323800) 6800 (240100)
Weekly Total Supply: 9420 (332700) 7360 (259900)
Lake St. Lawrence at Long Sault Dam 72.69 (238.48) 73.22 (240.22)
Weekly Mean Level:
Lake St. Louis at Pointe-Claire Weekly 21.68 (71.13) 21.21 (69.59)
Mean Level:
Montreal Harbour at Jetty #1 Weekly Mean 6.88 (22.57) 6.49 (21.29)
Level:
Ottawa River at Carillon Weekly Mean 1680 (59300) 1900 (67100)
Outflow:
Preliminary Lake Ontario Outflow for Week 10700 (377900) 6620 (233800)
Ending Fri, 10 Jan 2020:
Levels are in metres (feet) IGLD 1985. Supply and flows are in cubic metres (feet) per second m³/s (ft³/s).
(a) Levels that would have occurred with strict adherence to Plan 2014.
(b) Levels that would have occurred had there been no Lake Ontario regulation.
(c) For comparison purposes, Lake Ontario water level data since 1918 are used to be consistent with those published in the US and Canadian Great Lakes bulletins (http://www.waterlevels.gc.ca/C&A/bulletin-eng.html). Other averages are for the periods as follows: Lake Ontario outflows and levels at Long Sault and Pointe-Claire since 1960; Montreal since 1967; and Ottawa River outflow at Carillon since 1963.
The regulation plan for Lake Ontario specifies a weekly average outflow from Saturday through the following Friday, inclusive. To provide timely information for the coming week to the hydropower and Seaway operators, and our readers, we complete the regulation plan calculations each Thursday. Our calculations use the data available at the time, which are from the previous seven days (Thursday through Wednesday). Since the two time periods do not exactly coincide, their data are usually slightly different.
The table shows the actual flow for the week ending Wednesday. It also gives the preliminary flow for the coming week ending Friday. We emphasize that this is the preliminary flow, since unforeseen flow changes may occur after we have issued our notice. When these flow changes occur, they are reflected in the subsequent week's notice.
.
Information in this report is compiled from provisional data provided by: Environment & Climate Change Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Hydro Quebec, Ontario Power Generation Inc, the New York Power Authority, and the U.S. National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration.
Visit the Board's website at https://ijc.org/en/loslrb to find out more.
 

Opie

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news from around the lake, 2 articles to enjoy

Stop blaming Plan 2014, the data doesn't support your position
Hugo Rodrigues
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Published on: January 7, 2020 | Last Updated: January 7, 2020 7:13 PM EST

Protestors from Toronto to West Carleton march onto Parliament Hill to demand Government action on the shoreline flooding they attribute to plans made by the IJC. ALEX FIIPE JPG, BI
Pity the International Joint Commission and the International Lake Ontario – St. Lawrence River Board.
Neither has been able to find any relief this year as the Lake Ontario watershed faced another year of record-high inflows. Communities and politicians on both sides of border, those privileged enough to own waterfront properties, along with some municipalities bordering Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River, have spent too much time in the past months calling for the heads of those who lead the IJC and river board.
They’ve also complained, far too much, about Plan 2014— all because in the short time since the IJC finally adopted a new and scientifically more rigorous plan to manage water levels, there have been two years of record-high water inflows. Those flooded out are tired of the damage and nuisance, while a smaller number whose properties are left in dry dock share the anger from the other side of the coin.
What’s lacking is any real acknowledgement of what the ICJ and river board have done in their attempts to mitigate the impact of what Mother Nature is throwing at us. Instead, they get blamed.
Are these critics aware the IJC has allowed more water to be released from Lake Ontario in the last seven months of 2019 than at any other point since levels first started being recorded in 1900?
Are they aware that as soon as possible, flow rates through the Moses-Saunders dam were increased in the spring of 2019 to the maximum allowable levels that still allowed for safe navigation through this section of the St. Lawrence Seaway? Effectively, that the much-maligned Plan 2014 has barely been followed in 2019 at all?
The river board releases weekly information on water levels across the basin and flow rates through the dam. Anyone looking at this information this past year could clearly see where Plan 2014 had been abandoned in order to lower water levels upstream of the dam and in Lake Ontario as quickly as feasibly possible.
For the week ending Jan. 1, Lake Ontario was at 75.01 metres, which is higher than the average at this time of year of 74.54, but lower than it could be otherwise. Were Plan 2014 being followed, Lake Ontario would be 12 centimetres higher. The computed pre-dam level of Lake Ontario would be higher still, at 75.77 metres.
Emotion is winning this battle against data, as everyone continues to pile on the IJC and river board.
Someone needs to have the courage to give the data its due, and call an end to the deluge.
hrodrigues@postmedia.com
twitter.com/HugoAPRodrigues

------------------------------------------------------------------------

IJC: Lake Ontario outflows hit “unprecedented” levels
WATERTOWN — Regulators of Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River levels say the end of the Seaway shipping season and a spate of mild temperatures has enabled them to achieve “unprecedented” outflows through the swollen system in recent days.
The International Joint Commission said in a statement Wednesday that outflows through the Robert Moses-Robert H. Saunders Power Dam in Massena and Cornwall, Ontario, have reached up to 10,700-cubic-meters-per-second at times over the past few days, higher than the record sustained levels of 10,400-cubic-meters-per-second reached this past summer as both the lake and river spilled over their banks.
The difference is that the flows within the past week have not been sustained at record levels, but are still “higher than has ever been released in winter for several days,” the IJC said.
According to outflow data compiled by the International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence Board, which implements the IJC’s regulation plan, outflows averaged 10,442-cubic-meters-per-second in the six-day period between Jan. 1 and Monday, which the IJC termed “unprecedented” for this time of year. The period follows the closing of the Seaway shipping season, which ended Dec. 31.
Typically this time of year, outflows are reduced to assist with ice formation to help reduce the risk of ice jams on the St. Lawrence River. The river board had reduced outflows Dec. 21 to as low as 7,790-cubic-meters-per-second after air temperatures dropped well below freezing, but have since ramped outflows back up after temperatures consistently hovered near or climbed above freezing.
“These very high outflows are only possible under the current conditions and may only continue during a relatively short window before temperatures fall and ice formation resumes,” the IJC statement said.
The IJC cautions that may happen as soon as today, as the National Weather Service in Buffalo has indicated temperatures will fall into the single digits for most of the north country overnight. However, the service indicates temperatures will rebound by Friday and remain above normal through Tuesday.
The IJC says that if mild weather and ice conditions allow, “outflows will be increased again as much and as soon as possible.”
With all that said, there may not be a noticeable impact on lake levels even with the higher than usual outflows. The lake’s level is still more than a foot above its long-term average for this time of year and this is also the time of year when it usually begins its seasonal climb. Extremely high inflows from Lake Erie and any precipitation that falls across the Lake Ontario basin will factor into the overall impact on the lake’s level.
The river board also has to consider other factors when determining outflows, such as the potential impacts on Lake St. Lawrence above the dam and Lake St. Louis below it. Increasing outflows too quickly tends to drain Lake St. Lawrence, which is the source of several municipal water supplies, and high outflows can cause Lake St. Lawrence’s levels to rise dramatically, raising the risk of shoreline flooding.
With these factors in mind, the IJC says the river board “will continue to set outflows as high as possible based on changing conditions throughout the basin” in an attempt to reduce the impact of expected high water levels this year.
 

Opie

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The entire Lake Ontario lake basin will be receiving a large amount of rain

https://globalnews.ca/news/6392891/storm-forecast-greater-toronto-area-weather/


Flood warning issued as massive storm brings heavy rain to Greater Toronto Area

By Katherine Aylesworth Global News
Posted January 10, 2020 10:22 am
Environment Canada has issued a weather advisory warning of heavy rainfall and strong winds. File / Global News
The weather agency said a light drizzle beginning Friday morning is expected to gain strength heading into Saturday and taper off throughout Sunday.
Total rainfall amounts of 25 to 50 mm with wind gusts up to 90 km/h are possible. Areas farther from Lake Ontario are expected to see freezing rain that may last for several hours.
“Confidence is increasing on a major ice storm for locations north and west of the GTA and other parts of Ontario,” said Global News chief meteorologist Anthony Farnell. “I don’t think downtown Toronto will see much, if any, freezing rain.”

The Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) has issued a flood warning and advised people to steer clear of all shorelines, rivers and streams.
“All rivers within the GTA may experience higher flows and water levels, resulting in potential flooding and hazardous conditions, especially behind bridges and culverts where ice jams are present,” reads the TRCA warning. “The combination of slippery and unstable banks could create hazardous conditions.”
The storm is expected to have an impact on road conditions and travel plans.
 

Opie

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https://www.wnypapers.com/news/article/current/2020/01/10/139692/lake-ontario-communities-come-together-to-oppose-plan-2014


Lake Ontario communities come together to oppose Plan 2014
by jmaloni
Fri, Jan 10th 2020 08:30 am

The Lake Ontario Preparedness Group met Thursday in Porter Town Hall to hear updates on local tourism initiatives, and to jointly sign a resolution opposing the International Joint Commission’s Plan 2014.
Following presentations on both the Greater Niagara Fishing and Outdoor Expo and Discover Niagara’s marketing strategy, Village of Wilson Mayor Arthur Lawson shared portions of the resolution with the audience. He said his group wants the IJC to “immediately rescind and suspend Plan 2014,” which members have said adversely altered water levels, leading to damaging floods seen in two of the past three summers.
The IJC website stated, “The International Joint Commission was established under the Boundary Waters Treaty of 1909 to help the U.S. and Canada prevent and resolve disputes over the use of the waters the two countries share. Its responsibilities include considering applications for projects that affect the natural levels and flows of boundary waters, such as the control works at Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, New York.”
In December 2016, the IJC (per its press release) “signed an updated order of approval for the regulation of water levels and flows in Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River.” Plan 2014 was intended to “protect shoreline property and will retain, essentially unchanged, the environmental conditions and coastal protections on the lower St. Lawrence River, below the Moses-Saunders Dam.”
Though U.S. Section Chair Lana Pollack said, “Plan 2014 is a modern plan for managing water levels and flows that will restore the health and diversity of coastal wetlands, perform better under changing climate conditions and continue to protect against extreme high and low water levels,” extreme high water levels did occur, causing millions of dollars in damage to shoreline communities in 2017 and 2019. Boating seasons were lost, and local economies suffered.
The resolution reads, in part, “The adoption of plan 2014 by the International Joint Commission has substantially contributed to the damage being caused along the lakeshore, including the villages on Lake Ontario and the Niagara River; and … the Lake Ontario Preparedness Group, its residents and local businesses are once again incurring substantial damage to the property along and around their waterfronts, which has threatened not only the economic vitality of the area, but also the life and safety of residents and visitors to the Lake Ontario Preparedness Area, while at the same time causing severe property damage in and around the Niagara County waterfront; and … the Lake Ontario Preparedness Group in conjunction with the county of Niagara have experienced significant expense as a result of efforts to keep the high water from further impacting the Lake Ontario Preparedness Groups waterfronts; and … the flooding experience again this year threatens municipal infrastructure; and … it is conceivable and reasonable to expect future flooding as we experienced in 2017, 2019 and now 2020, which is causing great part by plan IJC 2014.”
The Lake Ontario Preparedness Group is an offshoot of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s Lake Ontario Resiliency and Economic Development Initiative. REDI earmarked $49 million for shoreline repairs.
Lawson said the group was formed to protect local businesses, generate positive publicity for waterfront communities, connect tourism entities to bolster additional visitation, and fight Plan 2014.
It has requested the IJC fall back to Plan 58DD; that any future water level plans provide additional shoreline protections; fund flood prevention, mitigation and response efforts; and include members of the group of related committees and task forces.
Lake Ontario Preparedness Group members include the Town and Village of Lewiston, the Town of Porter, the Village of Youngstown, the Village of Barker, the Town and Village of Wilson, and Town of Newfane.
 
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Opie

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I expect we will see many news items shortly as the Lake Ontario starts to rise rapidly after the weekend rain storm.

back on " Friday January 3rd, the average level is at 75.065 M (246.27 Feet) "

then last Friday the level was down to 75.04 M

as of noon today we are at 75.129

It will interesting to see how much more it will creep up by this Friday. And to make matters worse, the cold temps will be here by the weekend. We should expect for the IJC to decrease the discharge from the Mosses Saunders dam as they concentrate on the ice formation in the St Lawrence.

stay tuned
 
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Opie

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https://www.marinelog.com/coastal/inland/high-waters-and-adverse-weather-impact-seaway-traffic-levels/

High waters and adverse weather impact Seaway traffic levels
Written by Marine Log Staff


  • Bruce Burrows, President of the Chamber of Marine Commerce, has unveiled a 2020 wish list for legislative and policymakers to support the growth of Great Lakes-St. Lawrence and coastal shipping with a top priority being climate resiliency to deal with high-water levels.
The Chamber of Marine Commerce is a bi-national association that represents more than 130 marine industry stakeholders including major Canadian and American shippers, ports, terminals and marine service providers, as well as domestic and international ship owners.
Overall cargo on the St. Lawrence Seaway totaled 38 million metric tons in 2019, a decrease of 7% attributed to trade conflicts, challenging navigational conditions due to high waters and adverse weather impacts on key cargoes such as grain.
“The challenges of the 2019 shipping season underline the critical importance of protecting the future integrity of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence waterway as a reliable and efficient trade and transportation corridor for the United States and Canada,” sayd Burrows. “High water levels are negatively impacting residents and businesses, including the marine shipping sector that transports cargo through the St. Lawrence Seaway, and we need to work together with the International Joint Commission (IJC) and governments to conduct a proper study into water levels and their causes, and to develop a resiliency plan that can address stakeholder needs into the future.”
Throughout 2019 there was continued pressure on the IJC’s International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board, to lower Lake Ontario levels by raising water outflow at the Moses-Saunders dam to unsafe navigation levels that would have shut down Seaway shipping.
Marine shipping worked diligently with stakeholders for a solution to ensure safe navigation at record outflow levels for five months last year to help lower the Lake, taking on 26 mitigation measures that caused shipping delays, lost cargo business and millions of dollars of extra operating costs. The Chamber also supports the River Board’s recent actions to increase outflow levels at the dam during the winter, in order to lower Lake levels as much as possible before Spring.
“We would also like to see commercial navigation interests as members of the International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board to work alongside recent appointees representing community interests,” says Burrows. “Many different industries including agriculture, manufacturing, fuel supply, construction and the mining sector depend on the Great Lakes-Seaway transportation system, supporting 238,000 jobs and US$35 billion (C$45.4 billion) in economic activity in Canada and the U.S.”
Other legislative and policy priorities for 2020
Ensure that U.S. and Canadian governments continue to invest in maritime infrastructure and advance Coast Guard asset renewal. The CMC will be asking for the medium-term refurbished Canadian Coast Guard vessels and longer-term new builds announced in 2019 to be used to help resource ice-breaking in the Great Lakes, the Seaway and the lower St. Lawrence River, where cargo deliveries have been stalled or delayed in past winters and springs due to service breakdowns and a lack of assets.
Pursue a harmonized and practical approach to ballast water regulations aimed at domestic fleets. The Canadian government has put forward regulations that would require domestic fleets to install ballast water treatment systems despite the fact that no technology currently exists that reliably operates in Great Lakes conditions and trading patterns. At the same time, the United States Coast Guard is developing regulations that are not aligned with the technology standards or timelines of the Canadian regulations. We need one regulatory approach for the bi-national Great Lakes region that levels the playing field and recognizes the challenges faced by the domestic fleets in Canada and the United States.
New legislation to modernize Canada’s pilotage system for commercial ships was finally passed in June 2019, which holds promise to improve the efficiency and competitiveness of marine transportation while still ensuring the highest standards of safety. The Chamber will now be urging the Canadian government to form a “National Advisory Board” to gain stakeholder input into the ongoing reform of policies and supporting regulations. Its priorities will be to have policy makers review pilotage requirements (such as double piloting or mandatory zones) while taking into account the many technological advancements over the past 40 years. The Chamber would also like to see improvements made to the pilot certification programs, which allow domestic ships’ masters and senior navigation officers to pilot their own vessels. It is important for the focus of these programs to be on onboard training and evaluation and that they be as efficient as possible.
 
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Opie

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Good morning, news from around the Lake


International Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River Board
Ice is expected to resume forming this week in the Beauharnois Canal. The Lake Ontario outflow will be reduced to assist the formation of a stable ice cover. Outflows will depend on conditions in the St. Lawrence River and will be adjusted as necessary.




Friday January 17th, the average level is at 75.07 M (246.29 Feet)

Per Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Since 2009, the January lake level average has been 74.62 M ( 244.81 Feet )
The average lake level for January 2017 was 74.62 M ( 244.81 Feet )

( take note that the datum from 2019 has not been calculated yet into the figures )

Surface water temperature by the lift bridge is 4.4 C / 40 F

Reading date / Lake Average 2020
Jan 03 – 75.065
Reading date / Lake Average 2019
Dec 20 – 75.07
Dec 06 – 75.03
Nov 22 – 75.05
Nov 08 – 75.105
Oct 25 – 75.03
Oct 11 – 75.11
Sept 20 – 75.28
Sept 06 – 75.386
Aug 23 – 75.51
Aug 16 – 75.585
Aug 09 – 75.65
Aug 02 – 75.72
July 26 – 75.78
July 19 - 75.85
July 11 - 75.89
July 05 - 75.93
June 28 - 75.95
June 21 - 75.95
June 14 – 75.984
June 07 – 75.97
May 30 - 75.94
May 24 - 75.86
May 17 - 75.795
May 03 - 75.51
Apr 29 - 75.41
Apr 12 - 75.10
Mar 29 - 75.018
Mar 15 - 75.0
Mar 08 - 74.97
Feb 22 - 75.00
Feb 08 - 74.96
Jan 25 - 74.88
Jan 11 - 74.81
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2018
Dec 28 – 74.78
Dec 14 – 74.72
Nov 30 – 74.696
Nov 16 – 74.68
Nov 02 – 74.67
Oct 19 – 74.614
Oct 05 – 74.72
Sept 21 – 74.785
Sept 07 – 74.86
Aug 24 – 74.91
Aug 10 – 74.98
Jul 30 – 75.12
Jul 13 – 75.129
Jun 29 – 75.228
Jun 15 – 75.25
Jun 01 – 75.33
May 18 – 75.35
May 04 – 75.23
Apr 20 – 75.08
Apr 06 – 74.97
Mar 23 – 74.918
Mar 09 – 74.99
Feb 23 – 74.973
Feb 09 – 74.90
Jan 26 – 74.95
Jan 12 – 74.81 M
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2017
Dec 27 – 74.71 M
Dec 08 – 74.795
Nov 24 – 74.89
Nov 09 – 74.929
Oct 27 – 74.83
Oct 10 – 74.95
Sept 29 – 74.99
Sept 15 – 75.12
Sept 01 – 75.28
Aug 18 - 75.47
Aug 04 - 75.6
July 22 - 75.71

And courtesy of the IJC,, their numbers

International Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River Board
Ice is expected to resume forming this week in the Beauharnois Canal. The Lake Ontario outflow will be reduced to assist the formation of a stable ice cover. Outflows will depend on conditions in the St. Lawrence River and will be adjusted as necessary.
Week Ending: Average this time
Wed, 15 Jan 2020 of the year (c)
Lake Ontario / Lac Ontario
Actual end of week level: 75.04 (246.19) 74.57 (244.65)
Computed Plan 2014 Level (a): 75.17 (246.62)
Computed Preproject Level (b): 75.85 (248.85)
Weekly Mean Outflow: 9570 (338000) 6390 (225700)
Weekly Total Supply: 11680 (412500) 7120 (251400)
Lake St. Lawrence at Long Sault Dam 72.25 (237.04) 73.09 (239.80)
Weekly Mean Level:
Lake St. Louis at Pointe-Claire Weekly 22.10 (72.51) 21.29 (69.85)
Mean Level:
Montreal Harbour at Jetty #1 Weekly Mean 7.47 (24.51) 6.59 (21.62)
Level:
Ottawa River at Carillon Weekly Mean 2370 (83700) 1920 (67800)
Outflow:
Preliminary Lake Ontario Outflow for Week 8800 (310800) 6400 (226000)
Ending Fri, 24 Jan 2020:
Levels are in metres (feet) IGLD 1985. Supply and flows are in cubic metres (feet) per second m³/s (ft³/s).
(a) Levels that would have occurred with strict adherence to Plan 2014.
(b) Levels that would have occurred had there been no Lake Ontario regulation.
(c) For comparison purposes, Lake Ontario water level data since 1918 are used to be consistent with those published in the US and Canadian Great Lakes bulletins (http://www.waterlevels.gc.ca/C&A/bulletin-eng.html). Other averages are for the periods as follows: Lake Ontario outflows and levels at Long Sault and Pointe-Claire since 1960; Montreal since 1967; and Ottawa River outflow at Carillon since 1963.
The regulation plan for Lake Ontario specifies a weekly average outflow from Saturday through the following Friday, inclusive. To provide timely information for the coming week to the hydropower and Seaway operators, and our readers, we complete the regulation plan calculations each Thursday. Our calculations use the data available at the time, which are from the previous seven days (Thursday through Wednesday). Since the two time periods do not exactly coincide, their data are usually slightly different.
The table shows the actual flow for the week ending Wednesday. It also gives the preliminary flow for the coming week ending Friday. We emphasize that this is the preliminary flow, since unforeseen flow changes may occur after we have issued our notice. When these flow changes occur, they are reflected in the subsequent week's notice.
Information in this report is compiled from provisional data provided by: Environment & Climate Change Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Hydro Quebec, Ontario Power Generation Inc, the New York Power Authority, and the U.S. National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration.
Visit the Board's website at https://ijc.org/en/loslrb to find out more.
 
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News from around the Lakes

https://www.simcoereformer.ca/news/local-news/fear-and-resignation-along-southwestern-ontarios-battered-lake-erie-shoreline


Fear and resignation along Southwestern Ontario's battered Lake Erie shoreline
Washed-out roads. Caved-away banks. Monster waves. Homes and businesses flooded. Southwestern Ontario's Lake Erie shoreline has endured a brutal year of record-high water, with many worrying what 2020 will bring.
Laura Broadley
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Trevor Terfloth
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Published on: January 17, 2020 | Last Updated: January 17, 2020 11:26 AM EST

Cottages along Erie Shore Drive in Chatham-Kent get pounded by high wind and waves on Wednesday, November 27, 2019. (DAN JANISSE/Postmedia Network)



Washed-out roads. Caved-away banks. Monster waves. Homes and businesses flooded. Southwestern Ontario’s Lake Erie shoreline has endured a brutal year of record-high water, with many worrying what 2020 will bring. Postmedia reporters Trevor Terfloth and Laura Broadley travelled 300 kilometres along Erie to plumb the mood in the region.
PORT DOVER

The waves came in high and fast during the first flood that poured into Dave Tank’s two Port Dover stores.
“We were instantly flooded,” said Tank, who saw a foot of water cover the floor of his Cocoa Cabana, a new gourmet chocolate cafe that hadn’t yet opened for business.
“It put us a good half a week behind schedule.”
The flood also shut down his ice cream shop across the street for the entire year.
Tank had a five-day warning for the next flood, but his defences against the Halloween storm weren’t enough.
“We thought we were prepared, and it basically threw our preparation around like a toy,” he said.
The cafe was built to withstand flooding, but The Ice Cream Tank had to be redone.
“I just built (the ice cream store) three years ago and redid the whole thing, and I thought it was high enough to withstand the past floods,” said Tank, who estimated the damage to his ice cream shop at $30,000.
“It hurts. I lost my car through (the floods) too.”
LONG POINT
The complete story can be read here

https://www.simcoereformer.ca/news/local-news/fear-and-resignation-along-southwestern-ontarios-battered-lake-erie-shoreline
 

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https://www.canadianunderwriter.ca/catastrophes/canadas-biggest-insurance-losses-in-2019-1004172953/


Canada’s biggest insurance losses in 2019
January 22, 2020 by Greg Meckbach
Insured damage from floods, rain, snow and windstorms reached $1.3 billion in 2019, the Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) reported Tuesday, citing data from Catastrophe Indices and Quantification Inc. (CatIQ)
Like 2018, no single event in 2019 caused the high amount paid out for losses,” IBC said. “Instead, Canadians and their insurers experienced significant losses from a host of smaller severe weather events from coast to coast.”
At $250 million, the Halloween storm in eastern Ontario/Quebec ranked first on a list of 2019 severe weather events. The Niagara and Montreal areas were the hardest hit, both in terms of wind and water damage, IBC reported earlier.
The 2019 Cat year was relatively benign compared to 2018, when Cat damages were just shy of $2 billion ($1.9 billion).
Hurricane Dorian in Atlantic Canada ranked fifth on the list, at $105 million. When Dorian made landfall Sept. 7 near Halifax, it had estimated sustained winds of 155 km/h.
The second-most expensive weather event, at $208 million, was the flooding affecting Quebec and New Brunswick this past April and May, IBC said Tuesday. That was caused by high spring water levels on the Ottawa and Saint John rivers.
On April 27, thousands of homes in Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac, Que. were damaged when water from the Lake of Two Mountains breached a dike. Some homes in the area were flooded up to the main floor in five minutes, Michel Lacelle, vice president of organizational services in Eastern Canada for ClaimsPro/IndemniPro, told Canadian Underwriter earlier. In New Brunswick, flooding between Fredericton and Saint John resulted in dozens of road closures and hundreds of flooded homes. In Quebec, the provincial government reported more than 6,000 residences were flooded.
Aon plc ranked the floods third among the most significant events outside the U.S. in the Americas, according to its Weather, Climate & Catastrophe Insight: 2019 Annual Report, released Wednesday by Aon. Based on these floods, Aon reported economic losses of US$800 million and insured losses of US$210 million.
Topping Aon’s list (for non-U.S. Americas) was Hurricane Dorian, with US$8 billion in economic losses and US$2.5 billion in insured losses both in Canada and elsewhere.
Ranking third on CatIQ’s list of Canada’s costliest severe weather events of 2019, at $181 million, was a series of hail storms that hit Western Canada in July and August. Two winter storms, in the greater Toronto area and eastern Canada, ranked fourth at $114 million.
Aon said that worldwide, 409 natural catastrophe events in 2019 resulted in economic losses of US $232 billion. Of that total, private sector and government-sponsored insurance programs covered US $71 billion. In 2019, forty-one events caused US$1 billion or more in economic losses, 12 of which caused US$1 billion or more in insured losses.
Ranking sixth through eighth on CatIQ’s list released Tuesday were:
  • A winter storm Feb 3-4 at $70 million;
  • A southern Ontario winter storm Feb 24-25 at $48 million; and
  • A winter storm Jan 24-25 in Eastern Canada at $40 million.
 

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current lake level here 75.14 M ( 246.52 feet) IJC's number 75.08 M ( 246.33 feet )


https://www.quintenews.com/2020/01/23/lake-ontario-st-lawrence-river-board-releases-backgrounder-on-high-water-levels/


Lake Ontario-St.Lawrence River Board releases backgrounder on high water levels
Belleville, ON, Canada / Quinte News

David Foot
January 23, 2020 01:10 pm

The International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board is responding to calls for more information on water levels by issuing a background paper on high water in 2019.
The Board says question-and-answer style document outlines why there was so much flooding last spring and explains more about outflows, how the board’s actions affected water levels and what actions are being taken to reduce flooding moving forward.
Officials say the total amount of water released from lake outflows between January 2017 and this past December was the highest on record over any 36 month period, but inflows were also at record highs.
Those outflows reduce the severity of high water impacts on both Lake Ontario and the lower St. Lawrence River and the board says in 2017 and 2019 that reduced the peak and duration of flooding, while preventing flooding altogether in 2018.
You can read the full backgrounder by clicking here.
 

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Click on the link below for the complete news item

https://www.rochesterfirst.com/news/local-news/lake-ontario-outflow-reduced-dramatically-to-prevent-ice-jams/

Lake Ontario outflow reduced dramatically to prevent ice jams
Local News
by: James Gilbert
Posted: Jan 23, 2020 / 06:00 PM EST / Updated: Jan 23, 2020 / 07:30 PM EST


ROCHESTER, NY (WROC) — Major changes to outflows at the Moses-Saunders dam have taken place over the past several weeks. According to Lauren Schifferle, US Army Corps of Engineers, once shipping ended in 2019 outflows were able to be increased significantly. That is up to record levels. A large cold blast of air pushed through and that forced outflows to dramatically be reduced.
The outflow has reduced about 100,000 cubic feet per second.
The reduction is to prevent problems with ice jams downstream that can cause major damage. It is also to protect intake valves from freezing for municipal drinking water supply. “As ice starts to form, we need a slower speed,” said Schifferle. “That lets the floating ice to aggregate together and form large pans and large sheets of ice. When ice forms in that way, it’s allowed to form a big stable sheet, that’s ideal ice because it’s stable.”
The flow of water out of the Moses-Saunders Dam has an influence on Lake Ontario water levels as well as how much water flows into Lake Ontario. As the flow decreases, water levels likely increase. That has happened since January 9th and water levels have increased about four inches. If a large sheet of ice develops, outflows will increase dramatically.
Water levels are higher than in the past three years at this time.


*****************************************************************************************************


Click on the link below for the entire news item, including a news video clip

https://www.freep.com/story/news/2020/01/23/great-lakes-water-levels-flooding/4554143002/

Record high water levels wreaking havoc on Great Lakes coastline cities
Kathleen Gray, Detroit Free Press Published 1:41 p.m. ET Jan. 23, 2020 | Updated 6:45 p.m. ET Jan. 23, 2020

Record high water levels on the Great Lakes are wreaking havoc along Michigan’s coastlines, swallowing beaches and houses, swamping sewer systems, flooding roads and public buildings and turning farm fields into lakes.
And it’s only expected to get worse this year, state lawmakers were told Thursday.
“We won’t have much of a beach this summer. We’re telling people to plan on getting your feet wet if you come here,” said Pat McGinnis, city manager of Grand Haven, which sits on the shores of Lake Michigan. “We had to close a public building because of mold issues from the higher water. We’re shutting them down and tearing them down and there is no insurance coverage.”
In Saginaw County, where the Saginaw River leads into Lake Huron, Public Works Commissioner Brian Wendling said there’s no place for the water to go anymore.
“It’s not a question of if it’s going to flood, it will. But we’re going to have failed septic systems and flooded basements. I fully anticipate basements to collapse,” he said. “We’ve got areas where the water table is pushing itself into agricultural grounds. It was a bad year for agriculture last year — I expect it to be worse this year. It’s literally turned their fields into lakes.”
The high water levels in Lakes Superior, Michigan and Huron are breaking records, and state officials fear that the waters could rise another foot in 2020 if rainy weather comes anywhere near the deluges that hit the state last year.
Lake Superior currently sits at a mean elevation for January of 602.76 feet, almost an inch above its 1986 record. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers water level records for the Great Lakes date to 1918.
 

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Lakes Erie and Ontario start year with high water levels
News January 26th, 2020 The Welland Tribune



Winter storms could bring more shoreline erosion and flooding as water levels on the Great Lakes remain above average. - Dave Johnson , Torstar


Lake Ontario could see more shoreline erosion this winter as its level remains above average. - Bob Tymczyszyn , Torstar
1 / 2
Shoreline erosion and flooding in low-lying areas remain high across the Great Lakes as winter months bring large storms and winds across the basin.
Environment Canada and Climate Change said the risk comes as high-water levels continue across the lakes.
Through its Level News newsletter, the agency said lakes Erie and Ontario started well above average, even after a decline in December, which still saw the second- or third-highest monthly mean level for the month between 1918 and 2018.

Lake Erie started off the month 72 centimetres above average and 12 cm higher than at the same time last year.
The government agency said the level is the third-highest on record and 23 cm lower than the beginning-of-January record set in 1987.
Lake Ontario's level at the start of January was 48 cm above average; 24 cm higher than the water levels last year and the third-highest on record.
The last time the level was this high at the start of January was in 1946 when the level was 17 cm higher.
"We are now at the time of year when both lakes Erie and Ontario have reached their seasonal minimum levels. From this point on, they would be expected to hold steady and then start to rise over the next few months," the agency said in its newsletter.
Although Lake Erie is expected to start its seasonal rise in the next few months, Environment Canada said it would take a few months of consistently wet conditions to again see record-high levels. The lake will stay well above average throughout the winter and spring even with average or dry conditions.
With average conditions, Lake Ontario, which typically hits its annual minimum at this time of the year, will start to rise over the next few months. Average water supplies would keep the lake well above average while very wet conditions would again put the lake level back toward record highs.

In response to record levels on Lake Ontario, the International Lake Ontario–St. Lawrence River Board released a background paper which explains why the lake flooded in 2019, and why outflows were not higher in 2018 and 2019.

The paper explains how and why the board's actions affected water levels, and what actions are being taken to reduce the risk of flooding in 2020.

It can be found at https://ijc.org/en/loslrb/watershed/2019-high-water_Q-and-As.


Environment Canada and Climate Change Level News 2020 by Dave Johnson on Scribd

https://www.thespec.com/news-story/9821129-lakes-erie-and-ontario-start-year-with-high-water-levels/
 

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scotto

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What’s going on here at Confederation Beach Park?
Shoreline repairs close two sections of Waterfront Trail
Community Jan 13, 2020 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News



An excavator prepares to scoop up some stones during shoreline repair work by Wild Waterworks on Jan. 7. - Richard Leitner/Torstar
Sections of the Waterfront Trail at Confederation Beach Park were closed and rerouted on Jan. 6 to allow for shoreline repairs by Hutch’s restaurant and the Wild Waterworks Park.
JUST THE FACTS:
° The work is expected to take six to eight weeks, but could be delayed by weather, says Andrea McDonald, a senior project manager with the City of Hamilton’s public works department.

° At Wild Waterworks, stones weighing three to five tonnes are being buried at the base of the shoreline slope. The slope is then lined with geotextile and topped with specifically sized rip rap (stone), and capped with two layers of randomly placed armour stone. The area will then be restored with excavated sand and gravel.
° The protection at Hutch’s is slightly different because of the different beach size and lake conditions. Measures there include an armour stone cap at the top of the slope and placement of rip rap over geotextile to a 2:1 slope down to the water.
° The city awarded the $720,433.55 contract for the repairs to low bidder TDI International Ag Inc dba Eco Blue Systems last May.
° The city is planning repairs to a third area along the beach, by Lakeland Go-Karts, which will be part of a future capital budget.



by Richard Leitner
 
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Opie

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Hey Scott
Not sure from your vantage spot if you can see your "measuring device " just to confirm what I am seeing here on the Fisheries and Oceans web site. The lake has been quietly, slowly rising these last few days and as of 2 pm today current average level here is now at 75.18 M / 246.65 feet. If this is correct we are now entering lake mid spring lake levels in January, not good.
 

scotto

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Not good at all, this picture is from today showing our canal measuring device and the level has come up in the last week,

Jan29.JPG

According to the Tidal Observation website, the lake has risen .2 meters since the beginning of the month.
 

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Thursday January 30th, the average level is at 75.22 M (246.79 Feet)

Per Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Since 2009, the January lake level average has been 74.62 M ( 244.81 Feet )
The average lake level for January 2017 was 74.62 M ( 244.81 Feet )

( take note that the datum from 2019 has not been calculated yet into the figures )

Surface water temperature by the lift bridge is 4.4 C / 40 F

Reading date / Lake Average 2020
Jan 17 – 75.07
Jan 03 – 75.065
Reading date / Lake Average 2019
Dec 20 – 75.07
Dec 06 – 75.03
Nov 22 – 75.05
Nov 08 – 75.105
Oct 25 – 75.03
Oct 11 – 75.11
Sept 20 – 75.28
Sept 06 – 75.386
Aug 23 – 75.51
Aug 16 – 75.585
Aug 09 – 75.65
Aug 02 – 75.72
July 26 – 75.78
July 19 - 75.85
July 11 - 75.89
July 05 - 75.93
June 28 - 75.95
June 21 - 75.95
June 14 – 75.984
June 07 – 75.97
May 30 - 75.94
May 24 - 75.86
May 17 - 75.795
May 03 - 75.51
Apr 29 - 75.41
Apr 12 - 75.10
Mar 29 - 75.018
Mar 15 - 75.0
Mar 08 - 74.97
Feb 22 - 75.00
Feb 08 - 74.96
Jan 25 - 74.88
Jan 11 - 74.81
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2018
Dec 28 – 74.78
Dec 14 – 74.72
Nov 30 – 74.696
Nov 16 – 74.68
Nov 02 – 74.67
Oct 19 – 74.614
Oct 05 – 74.72
Sept 21 – 74.785
Sept 07 – 74.86
Aug 24 – 74.91
Aug 10 – 74.98
Jul 30 – 75.12
Jul 13 – 75.129
Jun 29 – 75.228
Jun 15 – 75.25
Jun 01 – 75.33
May 18 – 75.35
May 04 – 75.23
Apr 20 – 75.08
Apr 06 – 74.97
Mar 23 – 74.918
Mar 09 – 74.99
Feb 23 – 74.973
Feb 09 – 74.90
Jan 26 – 74.95
Jan 12 – 74.81 M
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2017
Dec 27 – 74.71 M
Dec 08 – 74.795
Nov 24 – 74.89
Nov 09 – 74.929
Oct 27 – 74.83
Oct 10 – 74.95
Sept 29 – 74.99
Sept 15 – 75.12
Sept 01 – 75.28
Aug 18 - 75.47
Aug 04 - 75.6
July 22 - 75.71

And courtesy of the IJC,, their numbers

International Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River Board
Conseil international du lac Ontario et du fleuve Saint-Laurent

Most of the ice cover in the Beauharnois Canal has been lost with the milder weather. Outflows will continue to be maintained as high as possible and will be adjusted as necessary, according to conditions in the St. Lawrence River. For all recent outflow changes: https://ijc.org/en/loslrb/watershed/outflow-changes


Week Ending: Average this time
Wed, 29 Jan 2020 of the year (c)
Lake Ontario / Lac Ontario
Actual end of week level: 75.14 (246.52) 74.60 (244.75)
Computed Plan 2014 Level (a): 75.27 (246.95)
Computed Preproject Level (b): 75.94 (249.15)
Weekly Mean Outflow: 8680 (306500) 6530 (230600)
Weekly Total Supply: 10510 (371200) 7050 (249000)
Lake St. Lawrence at Long Sault Dam 72.82 (238.91) 72.88 (239.11)
Weekly Mean Level:
Lake St. Louis at Pointe-Claire Weekly 21.80 (71.52) 21.33 (69.98)
Mean Level:
Montreal Harbour at Jetty #1 Weekly Mean 7.27 (23.85) 6.78 (22.24)
Level:
Ottawa River at Carillon Weekly Mean 2410 (85100) 1930 (68200)
Outflow:
Preliminary Lake Ontario Outflow for Week 9000 (317800) 6700 (236600)
Ending Fri, 07 Feb 2020:
Levels are in metres (feet) IGLD 1985. Supply and flows are in cubic metres (feet) per second m³/s (ft³/s).
(a) Levels that would have occurred with strict adherence to Plan 2014.
(b) Levels that would have occurred had there been no Lake Ontario regulation.
(c) For comparison purposes, Lake Ontario water level data since 1918 are used to be consistent with those published in the US and Canadian Great Lakes bulletins (http://www.waterlevels.gc.ca/C&A/bulletin-eng.html). Other averages are for the periods as follows: Lake Ontario outflows and levels at Long Sault and Pointe-Claire since 1960; Montreal since 1967; and Ottawa River outflow at Carillon since 1963.
The regulation plan for Lake Ontario specifies a weekly average outflow from Saturday through the following Friday, inclusive. To provide timely information for the coming week to the hydropower and Seaway operators, and our readers, we complete the regulation plan calculations each Thursday. Our calculations use the data available at the time, which are from the previous seven days (Thursday through Wednesday). Since the two time periods do not exactly coincide, their data are usually slightly different.
The table shows the actual flow for the week ending Wednesday. It also gives the preliminary flow for the coming week ending Friday. We emphasize that this is the preliminary flow, since unforeseen flow changes may occur after we have issued our notice. When these flow changes occur, they are reflected in the subsequent week's notice.
Information in this report is compiled from provisional data provided by: Environment & Climate Change Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Hydro Quebec, Ontario Power Generation Inc, the New York Power Authority, and the U.S. National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration.
Visit the Board's website at https://ijc.org/en/loslrb to find out more.
 
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Friday Feb 14th, the average level is at 75.18 M (246.65 Feet)

Per Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Since 2009, the February lake level average has been 74.69 M ( 245.05 Feet )
The average lake level for February 2017 was 74.82 M ( 245.47 Feet )

( take note that the datum from 2019 has not been calculated yet into the figures )

Surface water temperature by the lift bridge is 3.9 C / 39 F

Reading date / Lake Average 2020
Jan 30 – 75.22
Jan 17 – 75.07
Jan 03 – 75.065
Reading date / Lake Average 2019
Dec 20 – 75.07
Dec 06 – 75.03
Nov 22 – 75.05
Nov 08 – 75.105
Oct 25 – 75.03
Oct 11 – 75.11
Sept 20 – 75.28
Sept 06 – 75.386
Aug 23 – 75.51
Aug 16 – 75.585
Aug 09 – 75.65
Aug 02 – 75.72
July 26 – 75.78
July 19 - 75.85
July 11 - 75.89
July 05 - 75.93
June 28 - 75.95
June 21 - 75.95
June 14 – 75.984
June 07 – 75.97
May 30 - 75.94
May 24 - 75.86
May 17 - 75.795
May 03 - 75.51
Apr 29 - 75.41
Apr 12 - 75.10
Mar 29 - 75.018
Mar 15 - 75.0
Mar 08 - 74.97
Feb 22 - 75.00
Feb 08 - 74.96
Jan 25 - 74.88
Jan 11 - 74.81
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2018
Dec 28 – 74.78
Dec 14 – 74.72
Nov 30 – 74.696
Nov 16 – 74.68
Nov 02 – 74.67
Oct 19 – 74.614
Oct 05 – 74.72
Sept 21 – 74.785
Sept 07 – 74.86
Aug 24 – 74.91
Aug 10 – 74.98
Jul 30 – 75.12
Jul 13 – 75.129
Jun 29 – 75.228
Jun 15 – 75.25
Jun 01 – 75.33
May 18 – 75.35
May 04 – 75.23
Apr 20 – 75.08
Apr 06 – 74.97
Mar 23 – 74.918
Mar 09 – 74.99
Feb 23 – 74.973
Feb 09 – 74.90
Jan 26 – 74.95
Jan 12 – 74.81 M
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reading date / Lake Average 2017
Dec 27 – 74.71 M
Dec 08 – 74.795
Nov 24 – 74.89
Nov 09 – 74.929
Oct 27 – 74.83
Oct 10 – 74.95
Sept 29 – 74.99
Sept 15 – 75.12
Sept 01 – 75.28
Aug 18 - 75.47
Aug 04 - 75.6
July 22 - 75.71

And courtesy of the IJC,, their numbers

International Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River Board
With colder weather returning briefly, ice is expected to continue forming in the Beauharnois Canal and this will require Lake Ontario outflows to be temporarily reduced. As ice conditions stabilize and with milder temperatures expected to return, this may allow outflows to be increased again. Outflows continue to be maintained as high as possible and will be adjusted as necessary, according to conditions in the St. Lawrence River.

Week Ending: Average this time
Wed, 12 Feb 2020 of the year (c)

Lake Ontario
Actual end of week level: 75.13 (246.49) 74.61 (244.78)
Computed Plan 2014 Level (a): 75.26 (246.92)
Computed Preproject Level (b): 75.98 (249.28)
Weekly Mean Outflow: 8860 (312900) 6880 (243000)
Weekly Total Supply: 9000 (317800) 6910 (244000)
Lake St. Lawrence at Long Sault Dam 72.92 (239.24) 72.52 (237.93)
Weekly Mean Level:
Lake St. Louis at Pointe-Claire Weekly 21.73 (71.29) 21.37 (70.11)
Mean Level:
Montreal Harbour at Jetty #1 Weekly Mean 7.26 (23.82) 6.83 (22.41)
Level:
Ottawa River at Carillon Weekly Mean 2180 (77000) 1870 (66000)
Outflow:
Preliminary Lake Ontario Outflow for Week 8400 (296600) 7050 (249000)
Ending Fri, 21 Feb 2020:
Levels are in metres (feet) IGLD 1985. Supply and flows are in cubic metres (feet) per second m³/s (ft³/s).
(a) Levels that would have occurred with strict adherence to Plan 2014.
(b) Levels that would have occurred had there been no Lake Ontario regulation.
(c) For comparison purposes, Lake Ontario water level data since 1918 are used to be consistent with those published in the US and Canadian Great Lakes bulletins (http://www.waterlevels.gc.ca/C&A/bulletin-eng.html). Other averages are for the periods as follows: Lake Ontario outflows and levels at Long Sault and Pointe-Claire since 1960; Montreal since 1967; and Ottawa River outflow at Carillon since 1963.
The regulation plan for Lake Ontario specifies a weekly average outflow from Saturday through the following Friday, inclusive. To provide timely information for the coming week to the hydropower and Seaway operators, and our readers, we complete the regulation plan calculations each Thursday. Our calculations use the data available at the time, which are from the previous seven days (Thursday through Wednesday). Since the two time periods do not exactly coincide, their data are usually slightly different.
The table shows the actual flow for the week ending Wednesday. It also gives the preliminary flow for the coming week ending Friday. We emphasize that this is the preliminary flow, since unforeseen flow changes may occur after we have issued our notice. When these flow changes occur, they are reflected in the subsequent week's notice.
Information in this report is compiled from provisional data provided by: Environment & Climate Change Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Hydro Quebec, Ontario Power Generation Inc, the New York Power Authority, and the U.S. National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration.
Visit the Board's website at https://ijc.org/en/loslrb to find out more. For all recent outflow changes: https://ijc.org/en/loslrb/watershed/outflow-changes
 
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